Rose trimming and propagation

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by short farmer, Oct 29, 2006.

  1. short farmer

    short farmer Well-Known Member

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    I live in Norther Ca. nights are getting down to 30's is it safe to trim my roses now or should i wait till spring they are still throwing a bloom every once n awhile. Also read somewhere on this site about starting roses from cuttings could you share again. thanks ahead of time for the help.
     
  2. Show-Me-Stater

    Show-Me-Stater Well-Known Member

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    here's an excellent site that covers propagating rose cuttings outdoors. Very inspirational, I have had great results copying this method.

    Make More Roses website

    I usually wait until spring when the forsythias bloom to prune my roses, I just whack 'em all back to about 12" and watch them do their thing again.
     

  3. amwitched

    amwitched Well-Known Member

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    Here in Texas we prune back the rose bushes on Feb 14th.
    The climbing roses are pruned after their bloom period.

    I root my rose cuttings in plastic baggies. I place some moist potting soil in the bottom of the bag, dip my 6"-8" cutting in rooting hormone, stick it in the soil, zip the bag shut and wait for the roots to show.

    My MIL has an old aquarium on her porch 1/2 full of soil, she just sticks her cuttings in there and they root.
     
  4. Miz Mary

    Miz Mary Well-Known Member Supporter

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  5. Show-Me-Stater

    Show-Me-Stater Well-Known Member

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    I take cuttings in the spring after the first blooms have dropped their petals. Be sure and take cuttings from where a bloom was, rather than a non-blooming stem, and be sure and wait until after the petals drop to ensure that the stem is mature enough to root rather than rot away. This allows the cutting to get some roots going before the dreadful hot weather sets in, and they are well-rooted enough to survive the winter. I started several dozen rose cuttings this past spring, and as soon as we get a hard freeze I'll cover them with straw for the winter and then transplant them next spring. It really is an enjoyable hobby, some of my cuttings even bloomed in the rooting bed this summer. :dance:
     
  6. Txsteader

    Txsteader Well-Known Member

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    Well, you can take cuttings or 'trim' bushes (cleaning out dead wood, deadheading old blooms) most any time of year. If you're talking about pruning, then I'd wait until closer to Spring. Pruning is more drastic; you cut the entire plant back. If done too early, it could generate new growth that could be damaged by frost/freeze.

    Here's the American Rose Society's page for propagating roses:
    http://www.ars.org/About_Roses/propagating-young1.htm

    Have fun, but be forewarned, it's addicting :)