Rose of Sharon

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by countrygrrrl, Jul 17, 2004.

  1. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    Has anyone ever made starts of Rose of Sharon from branches? I have a gorgeous one in the back and I'd like to get more of it, if possible. I'm assuming cutting some off for starts would work with a Rose of Sharon? If so ... anyone got any hints for me on doing it? :)
     
  2. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    If we are talking about the same plant, my Granny Pearl used to do it. She loved them so, every time she found one of a different color in someone's yard she would beg a 'start'. She had a whole row of them. Just put the twig in some damp sharp sand and water with willow water. Or you can buy rooting hormone, but the willow water is free and works better.
     

  3. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    :) :) :)

    I'm going to try it tomorrow morning. I don't have willow water (would love to know what it is!), but I do have rooting compound.

    :) :) :)
     
  4. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    To make willow water take some green tips from a willow tree and chop small let soak in warm water over nite. Use the water on anything you want to root. You can keep pouring the water off and adding more to the same branches for a few days.
     
  5. mary,tx

    mary,tx Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm also interested in doing this, but will need to wait, I think, til next year when the branches are young and tender again here. My dad has three Rose of Sharon bushes, and told me that he had started the smaller two from seed from the bigger one. I wouldn't have thought of that.
    mary
     
  6. katydidagain

    katydidagain Adventuress--Definition 2 Supporter

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    Please forgive a slight rant but...

    Why anyone would want RoS is beyond me. I pull out seedlings from neighbor's trees endlessly; a 2 year old start is tough to uproot. This are weeds IMHO; pretty but nasty.

    I'm fairly tolerant about "surprises" but RoS, pachysandra, myrtle and ivy are the scourge of the earth.

    katy *who likes balance in the garden*
     
  7. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    He. :haha:

    It's alright, Katy. I feel that way about Bradford Pears.

    :no:

    Enough with the Bradford Pear trees already!

    :no:
     
  8. katydidagain

    katydidagain Adventuress--Definition 2 Supporter

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    Golly, I was so upset I made grammatical errors! :waa: Down with Bradford Pears, too! Why not plant something that blooms and bears fruit? I'm into fruit...

    katy
     
  9. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    Well, as long as we're ranting ...

    WHY OH WHY OH WHY do people plant silver maples?

    :no:
     
  10. mary,tx

    mary,tx Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I like fruit trees, too, and plant more every year. But I don't get what you're saying about the Rose of Sharon or the maples. :confused: :confused:
     
  11. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    Mary, most maples are alright, AFAIC.

    But people around here plants silver maples because they grow so fast. And silver maples like nothing more than propagating themselves all over the place. :no:

    Which wouldn't be a problem if they were a hardier tree like, say, a good old fashioned hickory or even a nice poplar. :)

    But in this area, they aren't particularly hardy. They're notorious for falling over during thunderstorms when the least little breeze comes along. :rolleyes: And unlike the noble oak or cheery hickory :) , they suffer an infinite number of strange (and ugly maladies), as well.

    If people would just have more patience and plant real trees, everyone's lives would be easier. But, nooooooo! They want trees now! So they plant silver maples.

    :rolleyes:
     
  12. katydidagain

    katydidagain Adventuress--Definition 2 Supporter

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    Well, again I've been beat to the punch! :waa: Hah! I have more to add.

    Generally, "trash" trees seed easily, have short lives, are soft wood, etc. thus little value. What I consider "garbage" may not fit with your definition. (I've traded oodles of "ditch lilies"!) I have a Norway Maple (junk tree lower than a silver) in my front yard I purposely planted when DS was born. The seedling came from my parents' house from the tree I climbed as a child so I wanted to grow it; it has meaning for me. What you choose to love doesn't have to meet with my approval or anyone else's. I just happen to hate RoS! :D

    katy
     
  13. mary,tx

    mary,tx Well-Known Member Supporter

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    lol We just had to have a very big, very old cottonwood taken out. Guess I won't consider a silver maple as the replacement.
    mary
     
  14. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    GET A POPLAR!! :) :) The kind of poplar also called a tulip tree in some places!

    I have one and it is sooooo huge and soooooo beautiful and soooo hardy!

    In fact, I had to have about 50 feet of it chopped off (STG! it was like 100' tall or something --- just huge!) because it was growing into the electric lines. The tree dudes were just disgusted --- they just wanted to down the whole thing. BUT IT CAME BACK EVEN MORE BEAUTIFUL THAN BEFORE! :D Except now it's really a fat tree, very lush and just gorgeous.

    They're wonderful! :)
     
  15. MoBarger

    MoBarger Goat's Milk soap for sale

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    Depending on the althea you have, it may be sterile. Because of their incredible ability to propagate, modern species of Rose of Sharon are hybrids and cannot reproduce.
    Reproducing by cutting would work though.
     
  16. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    I don't think this Rose of Sharon is sterile, as it's sending out more and more shoots by the year. Which is fine --- I've been clearing the fences for two years now -- that entire fenceline was blocked with sumacs (the invasive variety), weed trees and bull briar.

    :no:

    Instead, I've been trying to get the passion flower vines :) going (they don't need a lot of encouragement) and letting the Rose of Sharon get as fat as possible. It was nice when I got here --- it's a perfectly wonderfully fat thing now.

    In any case, i took cuttings yesterday and they're resting comfortable under saran wrap in some jiffy pots I rigged together. :)
     
  17. stonefly71

    stonefly71 Well-Known Member

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    Asprin also works as a rooting compound. I was just reading an old country side last night with that info in it. As asprin is made from willows.
     
  18. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    What I absolutely despise, hate and will not tolerate are siberian elms aka chinese elms. In the spring you are inundated with seeds that scatter everywhere and pick the worst places to sprout. If you miss one it becomes near impossible to uproot. And all summer they are covered with elm bugs that love to drop off and crawl down my shirt! And if they have been allowed to grow near a house they can cost major money to remove. They are also ugly.

    There! I'm done.
     
  19. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    Cyngbaeld:

    :yeeha: You go, girl! :yeeha:
     
  20. cwgrl23

    cwgrl23 Chief Vegtable Grower :) Supporter

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    Russian Olive trees are just as bad as elm trees. Around here they lose their leaves after the snow is on the ground so you have a nice mess to rake in the spring. They are the last to get their leaves in the spring. The worst of it is, there are thorns all over the branches and they break off in the wind. Not very fun when I go barefoot all the time. Those thorns hurt and they go in deep! :waa: They are also prone to losing branches in the smallest storm and always have dead spots in them. We are in the process of removing one from our property. We have it cut down and are now chopping it up.