Rose Hip C question

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Ann Mary, Oct 1, 2006.

  1. Ann Mary

    Ann Mary Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Is there a way to use rose hips as a Vitamin C source other than making tea from them? :shrug: I have an ABUNDANT suppy of them and I would really like to take advantage of their C properties....but in a way other than tea. Any any idea on how much "C' they will average per hip??? Any ideas??? Thanks so much! :)
     
  2. culpeper

    culpeper Well-Known Member

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    This site has a comparison chart of fruits and their vitamin C content. Rosehips vary according to cultivar.

    Generally speaking, for medicinal and culinary purposes, the old-fashioned roses are the best - the deepest red, the most highly perfumed.

    http://www.naturalhub.com/natural_food_guide_fruit_vitamin_c.htm

    How to use them? Plenty of ideas! Here's just a few.

    Rosehip and Apple Cheese (butter, curd)
    2kg apples
    60g red rosehips
    300ml fresh orange juice
    150ml water
    1kg raw sugar

    Wash and chop up the unpeeled and uncored apples. Slice the rosehips and tie them in a muslin bag. Put the apples and rose hips into a preserving pan with the orange juice and water and cook over low heat with the lid on until the apples are soft and pulpy. Remove the bag of rose hips and discard. Press the apples through a sieve and measure the purée. For every 500g allow 500g of sugar. Put the pulp and the sugar into the pan, and cook over medium heat, uncovered, until very thick, about 1 hour. Stir frequently to prevent burning or sticking. Spoon into jars while hot. Serve this preserve with all kinds of meat, or on warm new bread, fresh scones or hot buttered toast.

    Rosehip Candy
    1 cup rosehips, washed and seeds removed
    1 cup sugar
    2 1/2 tablespoons water
    extra sugar

    Dissolve the sugar in the water. Add rosehips and cook over medium heat. Be sure all hips are coated on the inside by tilting the pan and spooning the syrup over and around them. Shake pan occasionally. Cook until rosehips are just about to burn, about 5-10 minutes. Remove hips as quickly as possible from pan, individually if possible, and drop them onto a sheet of waxed paper that is covered with granulated sugar. Separate any nested hips. Sprinkle sugar over them, then roll in the sugar until the hips are well coated on all sides. While they are drying, break off any hard bits of sugar. Add more sugar and toss the hips gently with two forks. Store in a glass jar.

    Rosehip Crumble Pie
    23cm unbaked pie shell
    1 cup dried rosehips
    1/4 cup milk
    1 1/2 cups sifted flour
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    pinch salt
    1/2 cup butter or margarine
    1 3/4 cups brown sugar
    2 eggs
    pecan halves (optional)

    Soften rosehips in milk. Sift together flour, baking powder and salt. Beat in butter and sugar. The mixture will be crumbly. Set aside 1 cup of the mixture for topping. To the remainder, add beaten egg yolks, milk and rosehips. Beat the egg whites until peaks hold form. Fold into the rosehip mixture. Spoon into pastry case, sprinkle with reserved topping. Garnish with pecan halves if desired. Bake at 180°C for 35-45 minutes.

    Rosehip Cookies
    1/2 cup butter
    1/2 cup sugar
    1 egg, beaten
    pinch salt
    2 teaspoons rose water
    pinch nutmeg
    1 teaspoon rosehips
    1 1/3 cups flour
    icing sugar

    Cream the butter and sugar together until fluffy, then add the egg, salt, rose water and nutmeg. Put the rosehips in a food processor or blender and process for one minute. Mix the rosehips and flour into the egg mixture. Add more flour if needed until the batter is firm enough to hold its shape. Drop teaspoons onto a greased oven tray, and bake at 180°C for 10-15 minutes until the edges are nicely browned. Transfer to cooling racks and sprinkle cookies lightly with icing sugar.

    Rosehip Jam
    2 cups rosehips
    2 cups water
    sugar

    Cook hips in water until tender. Push pulp through a sieve. Add 1 cup of sugar to each cup of pulp. Cook until pulp thickens like jam consistency. Pour into sterilised jars and seal.

    Rosehip Syrup
    Crush 1kg rosehips and put into 1500ml boiling water. Bring back to boil, remove from heat and let stand for 10 minutes. Strain through muslin and when it ceases to drip, return to pan with another 750ml boiling water. Re-boil and allow to stand as before, strain. Mix both extracts, pour into a clean pan, reduce by boiling until juice measures about 750ml. Add 500g sugar. Stir over gentle heat until sugar dissolves, boil for 5 minutes. Pour into hot bottles, seal.

    Rosehip Leather
    Use soft ripe rose hips. It takes about 4 cups of rose hips to make 2 cups of puree. Remove stalks and blossom ends. Rinse in cold water. Put them into a pan and add enough water to almost cover. Bring to the boil and simmer 10 to 15 minutes. Press through a sieve or strainer. All that does not go through the sieve is placed in the pan again. Add a little water, enough to almost cover, if you want a thicker puree, add slightly less. This time heat but do not boil so vigorously. Press through a sieve again and then repeat the process one more time. Discard the seeds and skin. Line a cookie sheet with plastic wrap. Spread puree evenly over the plastic but do not push it completely to the sides. Leave in the hot sun to dry for about 6 8 hours.
     

  3. kenuchelover

    kenuchelover Well-Known Member

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    Nice recipes!

    I've plenty of wild (not feral) roses on my place, the hips of which are just about the size of early peas. I wonder how they match up, vitamin C wise.

    Oh.... common everyday GRASS (the lawn type) has a significant vitamin C content, it's comparable to Orange juice. Pine needles (eh, I think spruce also) has a largish vitamin C content, as do some mosses.

    Indians used teas variously made from pine needles, spruce needles, or reindeer moss, to prevent and/or cure scurvy. (Inuit ate the stomach & intestinal contents of caribou they killed, for the same purpose). British sailors were called "limeys" by sailors of other nations, after a British doctor read an old (half century or better?) account of Canadian Indians curing a party of French explorers by giving them such a tea. After a bit of research, he deduced that it was the vitamin C content in those plants that did the trick..... and convinced the British Admiralty to mandate lemons & limes (or the bottled juice thereof, when the fresh fruit ran out) to prevent scurvy on board ship. Previously, it had been a significant cause of mortality.
     
  4. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    i am new to rosehips and was looking at some on the wild brambles in the foeld the other day. they seem to be nothing more than a skin over some seeds. are other varieties more fleshy? are the seeds edible?
     
  5. whodunit

    whodunit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Does all that heat deplete the vitamin C? Also, seem to remmber hearing not to use metal utensils because of the same reason.

    Just asking...
     
  6. Ann Mary

    Ann Mary Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The rose hips I want to use are the wild variety plus what my rugosa tame roses bear. Those rugosas have 'huge hips'! :) Great recipes! thanks! I will try some with the 2 gallons of hips I picked just today in about 15 minutes....those lingonberry pickers work great for picking the hips, by the way! (around here they are called huckelberry pickers) but I was really wondering this: instead of taking a vitamin C pill is there a way to 'take a rose hip' instead??? My son at age 14 ate one just to prove he could...but I'm NOT 14 and to me, those hairy seeds just won't go down! And I wonder if the stomach can digest the raw hips anyways, especially dried ones. Anyone know this??
     
  7. Tabitha

    Tabitha greenheart

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    I wish I had rose hips here. have not found a source of rugose roses that are not outrageously priced. we had them en masse at home. now don't tell your son, but as kids we used the seeds as itching powder, putteng them down somebody's neck. for snacking pretend you are a squirrel, just kind of nibble the meat off the fruit around the seeds and then throw the seeds away. In my estimation they taste better after frost when the fruit is not hard anymore. then I just kind of suck it like candy. you can make fantastic jam that is the traditional do-nut filling at home. the Nearings kind of simmered their rosehips and put up the juice in bottles for their winter vit.C source.
    some of it is lost due to heat but there should be plenty left.
     
  8. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

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    I would think you could dry them in a dehydrator until they are totally dry and then pulverize them in a coffee bean grinder then add the powder to other foods/drinks to increase the V-C level.

    donsgal
     
  9. Shepherd

    Shepherd Well-Known Member

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    I have no experience with Rose Hips yet but just found some from wild roses on our land. Problem is they're very tiny and I've heard you have to remove the seeds. Why?

    Is there no way I can use them without removing the seeds? If I had to remove them, I'd have a hard time convincing myself to go to all that work since they're so tiny.
     
  10. culpeper

    culpeper Well-Known Member

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    The colour of rose hips varies, but in general, orange hips are not quite ripe, and deep red hips are overripe. Overripe hips are sweet, but have lost much of their vitamin C.

    Older, more developed hips also have more unusable material inside the hips, and are therefore harder to clean after you remove them. The outer fleshy fruit is the edible section, but inside are hairy sections each enclosing a single seed. This part is not edible and some people get sick from ingesting it.

    As with other fruits, you'll get the most vitamins if ou use them while they are still fresh off the rose.

    To prepare rose hips for tea, cut off the bloom stem, cut the hip in half, and scrape out the seeds and hairy pith. This can be very tedious with tiny hips, so you may want to save the smallest hips for jellies. Rose hips used for jellies don't need to be seeded or scraped.

    You can use rose hips either fresh off the vine, dried, or preserved. To dry the fruit spread the hips out on a clean surface. Allow them to dry until the skin begins to feel dry and slightly shriveled. At this point, split the hips in half and take out all of the seeds and tiny hairs in the centre.

    After the seeds are removed you can let the hips dry completely. Don’t wait to remove the seeds until hips are completely dry or you will have trouble with de-seeding.

    Store the dried hips in sealed plastic bags. Freeze for long term use or put in the refrigerator if you plan on using over a two or three month period. Hips can be eaten as a semi-sweet snack at anytime.

    Note this warning: "Anyone using rose hips for cooking should remove all the seeds. They are covered with sliver-hairs that, when ingested, irritate the digestive system and cause what the aboriginal people call "itchy bottom disease." I have not been able to discover WHY the hairy bits are irritating, but I do know that their effect is very similar to those little hairs on stinging nettle!!

    Compare the nutritional content of oranges to rose hips and you will find that rose hips contain 25 percent more iron, 20 to 40 percent more Vitamin C (depending upon variety), 25 times the Vitamin A, and 28 percent more calcium.

    In addition, rose hips are a rich source of bioflavanoids, pectin, Vitamin E, selenium, manganese, and the B-complex vitamins. Rose hips also contain trace amounts of magnesium, potassium, sulphur and silicon.
     
  11. Rita

    Rita Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Another good source of vitamin C is the sumac (not the poison one) The large red clusters were used by the Indians and as I recall you just soak them in water and strain so no Vit C would be destroyed. I made sumac jelly one year also.
     
  12. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    I found a bush here in camp bondsteele Kosovo last week that has loads of hips that are the best I have seen they are red and about the size of a nickel they are juicy and taste just like the ascorbic acid vitamins that the spanish army puts in their MRE's.
     
  13. Shepherd

    Shepherd Well-Known Member

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    How do you tell the difference between them so you know which is poison?
     
  14. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    I eat them raw,they are tasty,I like em.Never bothered my stomach.The tea,I like that too.

    BooBoo
     
  15. culpeper

    culpeper Well-Known Member

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    Re Sumac:

    Several species of sumac (Rhus spp) which are native to North America are poisonous, including R. radicans (Poison Ivy) and R. diversiloba (Poison Oak). All of the poisonous varieties have white berries. All of the safe sumacs have red or orange-red berries. Poison sumac and poison ivy have flowers (and fruits) along the stems below many of the leaves. The non-poisonous sumacs have terminal flowers and fruits. Safe species include:

    Staghorn Sumach (Rhus typhina) up to 10 metres in height. Fruits in summer. This is the species most common in Europe. Spreads profusely via suckers to make massive colonies and individual plants are short lived.

    Smooth Sumac (Rhus glabra) grows 3-6 metres in height.

    Fragrant Sumac (Rhus aromatica) A mounding shrub up to 2 metres tall. A dwarf variety is available which grows only to 15-30cm tall. Foliage is dark green and glossy. Bright yellow flowers in spring. Berries are dark wine red in colour, globular and appear on female trees in summer.