Rope end treatment to prevent unravelling?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by RAC, Jun 23, 2004.

  1. RAC

    RAC Guest

    What do people do with the nylon ropes with a core to keep the ends from fraying? I know with the old hemp ropes you do a special "wrap" with thinner cord, but that wouldn't look right.

    I bought it to go through the holes in one of those little square drawstring rucksacks with the grommets on the bottom. Tie knot to secure it, but the cut ends????

    Isn't there something to dip them in? Like a liquid plastic film? I know people used to burn the ends, but that doesn't look all that great on white cord. Maybe colored duct tape?

    Thanks for any help!
     
  2. john#4

    john#4 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    386
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2003
    Location:
    VT
    hay, just burn the end a little. It will melt and you won't have any more truble.
    john#4
     

  3. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

    Messages:
    28,248
    Joined:
    May 20, 2004
    Location:
    SE Missouri
    hot melt glue works pretty well if you want it to look nice. You might have to practice a few times to get it right. And be sure to keep a glass of ice water right by where you are working in case you get it on you. It can make a nasty burn because it sticks to the skin.
     
  4. Zuiko

    Zuiko Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    124
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2004
    Location:
    Minnesota
    I dont remember where I saw it, but I remember some 1" or so diameter ropes with like 4" of the end wrapped in electrical tape
     
  5. fin29

    fin29 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,622
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    Location:
    Maine
    That's what we use. It actually looks pretty nice if you're careful when doing it.
     
  6. adofus

    adofus Member

    Messages:
    21
    Joined:
    May 21, 2004
    Funny you should ask this now. This month's The Family Handyman covers this and just came in the mail today. Use a soldiering iron to cut it, thus cutting and sealing at the same time.
     
  7. RAC

    RAC Guest

    Adofus, that sounds like a winner--thank you (and for subscribing to Family Handyman)! And it will keep the unused end of the remainder neat as well as hide the inner "core" of the rope.

    I used to just light a match to the end, but that always blackened it, which is fine for normal use, but I wanted DD's new (from thrift store, but new to her) rucksack to look nice. The other thought I had was to use Fray-Chek (sp?), but that is expensive. Don't have a hot glue gun, although I read somewhere that you can melt the glue in a makeshift double-boiler.

    If I can't find the soldering iron I will use the electrical tape until I can :)

    Thanks again, everyone!
     
  8. Mike in Ohio

    Mike in Ohio Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,143
    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2002
    RAC,

    Soldering Iron is definately the way to go. The only thing is to make sure you get the end melted enough so that it is a solid blob. If you don't you will get it partially unravelling and then you will have to cut the end off.

    The other way to do it is to make an eye in the end. To do this you will need a fid, a knife (sailers knife with spike preferable) and a palm. Ahhh, this brings back memories <G>.

    Mike
     
  9. RAC

    RAC Guest

    Is "it'll ruin my soldering iron" an excuse for me to get one of those little woodburner tools and use it instead to melt the rope? The above is what DH said, when I asked to borrow it, LOL. I thought that the nylon would just peel off when it cooled, or am I incorrect?