road frontage doesn't mean you can drive there!

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by cc-rider, Aug 17, 2004.

  1. cc-rider

    cc-rider Baroness of TisaWee Farm Supporter

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    I just called about a place on United Country that says "road frontage" and "good access". It's in WV, if that means anything.

    Anyway... it turns out that easy access means parking "down the hollar" in a place you don't own ("that's ok, sweetie, just ask the owners if its ok for you to park there"), hiking across a small creek, up the bend to the first row of electric poles and take a sharp right. That's where your property starts.

    I thought "good access" meant you could drive to it. No clue how they get "road frontage".

    Is this NORMAL???? I asked if the creek had a bridge and she said "heaven's no! If it did, everyone would be traipsing up there!" How do people get to their property normally??? I'm sure that a neighbor, no matter how nice he is, isn't going to want me parking my car there.... and I sure don't intend on walking miles to my property with a load of groceries, etc.

    Also, they have a small amount of timber reserved until the contract expires. Is this normal?

    I'm from the flat lands. When you buy a piece of property, it is perfectly square with a road going in front of it. And a driveway if you are lucky. I'm spoiled. :)
     
  2. BCR

    BCR Well-Known Member

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    It isn't unusual for their to be county road right-of-ways. Find out if there is one. They do not have to maintain it as a paved road, but no-one can keep you from using it, so neighbors can't lock out neighbors.

    Go back and ask more questions-check the assessors, courthouse records, etc. if it is worth researching.

    It isn't unusual for mineral rights to be owned by someone other than the property owner. Check that out too.

    That timber contract would annoy me. How are they getting in and out?
     

  3. cc-rider

    cc-rider Baroness of TisaWee Farm Supporter

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    Supposedly they haven't exercised that right yet. They are reserving the rights to a small portion (the realtor is guessing an acre?? It is a 57 acre parcel) up until a certain date. After that date, they don't have rights anymore. I need to find out HOW much land/trees and WHAT the date is.

    The realtor said it would be a good thing if they DO exercise the rights because then they have to put in a road to get to the property and the trees.

    I'm just not sure I want someone putting a road any place they want on MY property. :no:

    Chris
     
  4. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

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    In most states, it is illegal to sell land without access or some type of easement leading to the property's boundary. Talk to the owner/broker of the co. and find out if it's just a mistake or the agent didn't do his homework. If you are really P.O.'d about it, you could file a complaint with the state real estate commission for misrepresentation or deceptive advertising.
     
  5. SRSLADE

    SRSLADE Well-Known Member

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  6. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Road frontage means the parcel touches the road at some point. Usually means touches the road enough 'minimum' for a driveway. This property does NOT have road frontage.

    Access in this day and age usually means there is a way to drive into the property for at least a portion of the year. Good access should mean you can drive into the property anytime of year. Deeded access means that the property between you and the road has a portion that has a legal easement for you to reach your property. It doesn't look like this property has 'access'.

    Does the price of the property reflect the lack of frontage and access?
     
  7. Hoop

    Hoop Well-Known Member

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    Run from this property as quick as you can.

    The loggers can leave you with a road that looks like this:
    [​IMG]

    and your property will look like this:
    [​IMG]


    Selling property without any access happens all the time. Selling the property without the timber rights for a certain period of time is also common.

    BEWARE!
     
  8. Irish Pixie

    Irish Pixie Limp Bisket LOL

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    Hoop-we have our timber under contract right now. That land is horrible, but the owner has the right to put specific wording in the contract. Our contract reads that the timber company must clean up, and bring out the tops right up to the road where it's easy for us to get to it for firewood. We also wrote in that they must clean up after themselves, it basically has to look like when they started including leveling all ruts. We took pictures to prove what it looked like prior to logging. Hopefully, it will dry out enough for them to get the timber this year.

    It's really up to the owner to make sure that this can't happen. Selective timber harvesting is a great money maker. We paid off the land contract on 108 acres of land with selective timbering. We'll be able to pay off the farm in 10 years (15 years early) with the timber on that acreage.

    Stacy in NY
     
  9. RAC

    RAC Guest

    "Frontage" can also mean "can be seen from the road (freeway, whatever)". How you get there, though, can be be a real pain. A lot of businesses buy alongside the road or freeway, thinking of it as free 7/24 advertising, but most people can't be bothered to find you unless the exit is obvious, and if they can't find you, you don't get any business.