Roaches in the hive

Discussion in 'Beekeeping' started by Kathy-momof9, Sep 8, 2004.

  1. Kathy-momof9

    Kathy-momof9 Member

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    This is one of Kathy's kids :) I just got into the hobby of beekeeping this year, and started a colony of Italians in July. They are still week, and have about 6-7 frames pretty well drawn out in the lower deep. Two weeks ago while inspecting I noticed one or two roaches crawling around in the hive, I did away with them and didn't think much more about it. Then while inspecting the hive today I found a LOT more, also, there were large grubs and cocoons on some of the unoccupied (by bees) frames, which I assumed are from the roaches? I believe I got out all of the cocoons and grubs, but the roaches were very fast and a lot got away. What can I do to get rid of them and prevent them from coming back? I'm guessing once the hive gets stronger the bees will keep them out themselves? I'm also worried that the colony will not be strong enough to make it through the winter, is there something I can do (other than feeding) to help build them up? Thanks
     
  2. dla

    dla Well-Known Member

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    I don't know a thing about bees, except that we owe it to beekeepers now that there are any more honeybees.
    But I wanted to say it sounds like you are a careful beekeeper and I'm sure you'll do well.
    Good luck with the hive!
     

  3. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Yeah, that is an awful late start for a new colony. They certainly wouldn't make it here in the north.

    We don't have roaches in our area, but I've dealt with mice and ant problems in hives. You'll probably have to go through the hive carefully to kill all you can. Once roaches have already infiltrated the hive, they take on the odor of the hive and are considered part of the colony and are left alone. Then use an entrance reducer to restrict the opening to an area that the bees can defend. It will take careful monitoring to make sure that there is enough access for your growing colony.
     
  4. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Roaches do not make grubs and cocoons. They put out oblong brown egg sacks, and the little roaches hatch out of them already looking like roaches. If there were non-bee grubs there, they were something else.
     
  5. kosh

    kosh Well-Known Member

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    perhaps they are wax moth grubs. They will eat the wax and form webbing and cocoons.

    It sounds like you have a very weak hive. Are you feeding them? If not, i would think that feeding them may help them build up faster and increase their numbers enough so they will be able to remove the grubs and the roaches. If you have another hive that is strong, take a couple of frames of brood and eggs and putting them in the weak hive to give them a boost.

    Also, try to hand pick the grubs and cockroaches out of the hive. If you see the tan or brown roach egg sacks, remove those too. That should help a bit too.

    Good luck,

    Jason
     
  6. Oregonsparkie

    Oregonsparkie Well-Known Member

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    You might try and raise the hive up in a stand and put the feet of the stand in buckets of water to keep out unwanted pest.
     
  7. justgojumpit

    justgojumpit Well-Known Member

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    Yes, this would work. I am also wondering if roaches can fly or not, as this would only work if the roaches can't fly.
     
  8. Kathy-momof9

    Kathy-momof9 Member

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    Ok, yes, the bees are being fed. And the grubs were in oblong sacks, had more of a green/white color to them, about the size of, if not bigger than the bees themselves. I did think it could be wax moths, except for the size, I thought they were smaller? The hive is up on cement blocks, I'm going to try making a stand with 'feet' so I can put them in water (I also heard motor oil works well?), and hopefully that will work. I know wood roaches can fly, whether or not these are wood roaches I don't know. Thanks for all the advice! :)
     
  9. beeman97

    beeman97 Well-Known Member

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    Kathy's kid,
    you probably need to thicken up the sugar mixture your feeding to encourage the queen to lay ,, this will help build the hive during the fall now ,,,, also ,, a menthol pack in the top of the hive will help greatly with the wax moth larva that are invading ,, that is what they are by the way ,,, the larva can become quite large when given unlimited food & little resistance from the bee's ,,, if not taken under conrtol quickly you will lose the hive with in jsut acouple weeks. The roaches unless in large #'s are not a threat to the hive & are actually helpfull in ridding the hive of things the bee's don't clean up themselves, sooooo ,,, don't spend time worrying about the roaches & concentrate on the wax moths heavily. Good Luck
    Rick

     
  10. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Terri is correct on her description of roaches. Baby roaches look similar to adults, except adults are bigger and have wings, even if they don't fly. Generally, flying roaches are quite large and are unskilled flyers, kind of like beetles. Tell me the size of the largest roaches you are finding. It is quite possible that you could use a bait that the bees would not be interested in or put in a bait station. Although, if Rick is correct about the roaches not being a problem, then its not worth the effort. Still the idea of a lot of roaches being in the hive is gross. I have a lot of exterminator friends that keep bees and if you help me identify the type of roach I will ask them some questions. We don't have woods roaches here, but I may be able to help identify them.