River irregation..pumps?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by jackie c, Dec 29, 2004.

  1. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    I have a small river that runs through my land, and want to use it for irregation for my vegetable plots. What is the best pump and horsepower to use. Should I use more than one? The plots are a total of about an acre, the largest being 200'x200'. It is a slow grade down to the river of about 200' and another 200-300 feet to the gardens. A sump pump dosen't seem to have enough power to get a good flow that distance. Yes I have water rights to use the river as an irrigation source.
     
  2. Darren

    Darren Still an :censored:

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    You need to know the difference in elevation (vertical distance) between the river and the highest point of your garden to determine what pump will work. The horizontal distance you gave is important only in figuring the friction losses and thus determining the pipe size. If you're going a long distance a large pipe will have less friction losses than a smaller pipe and you'll lose less pressure.

    One of the companies that makes hydraulic rams makes a current driven pump. If the vertical distance isn't too great, that would pump the water for you without needing electricity or gasoline to run a pump. Setting up a tank by the garden means you should be able to get a greater flow if needed.
     

  3. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    your take of 6,000 gals should be well under the need for a take permit.still powers that be are getting real picky! are you flood irragating or nozzel? soil type? probably a ten horse 2 inch line should get ya there. honda if you can afford it.for an acre don,t want to much tied up in capital.we use a similar set up to add water to manure pits
     
  4. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Northern Tool carries some good pumps. You want one that can handle trash. It is still a good idea to screen the intake. You can buy gas pumps or electric. The electric is easier to deal with IMHO. To get the drop calculated you can purchase a small sight level. They are not expensive. Your local hardware may carry them or you can find them online.
     
  5. Darren

    Darren Still an :censored:

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    This links to the water driven pump I mentioned. Once you anchor it in the stream it pumps continuously without electricty or gasoline. Supposedly there's no maintenance required.

    http://www.riferam.com/sling/index.htm
     
  6. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    jackie, Good thinking and plan!

    I Don't have much to add about the types of pumps you could use, and some very good info given already.
    In regards to your water temp and such, I am guessing it might run cold in the river so it might be worthy to have a spot dug close to your garden to fill and let the water warm there before irrigating to your garden. Around here they also use those large plastic containers. Let the sun do some of your heating.
    There is a large market gardner in this area doing just what you plan. The river runs below the hill from there that is quite a slope. They pump the river water to their gardens. The gardens they have are on heavy clay/sand, so they tile drained the field so the plant gain most benefit to growing by any amount of rain or supplemental irrigation when dry.

    One year the drought was bad here for about 3 weeks. You know how that can desicate transplants and ruin the garden plan. I took containers down to the pond and filled them leaving on the trailer to warm. I watered each plant at the roots of about a 1/2 acre garden. It saved the garden to flourish once rain did come. I was glad to have the source, but I too planned for pumping that water up if I ever got a pump. It's about a 1000 yd. distance and about a 50' lift.

    If you plan on having a pond dug, then maybe you'll want that extra 'hole in the ground' next to your garden for storing water. I'm assuming you have clay undersoil to hold the water if you do this. ;)

    Rich
     
  7. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all the great info and advice, I have something to work with now. Good point about water temps, never thought of that. The pond will work, I have heavy clay subsoil.