Ringworm??

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by Sarah J, Jun 21, 2004.

  1. Sarah J

    Sarah J Well-Known Member

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    Okay - I'm back from vacation...everyone did just fine and no one is any worse for the wear in their new pasture...had a branch fall but missed all four sheep and came down harmlessly in the one storm. No predator problems at all. Thanks for everyone's concern on the shelter issue. I got a couple of plywood pallets set up for them before we left - it seems to have done the trick!

    NOW I have a question: the youngst lamb, about 3 months old?, has a bald head now. I haven't been here to watch it develop, but my best guess is a flaming case of ringworm. My goats had it last month and we treated it with Lamisil (sp?). It doesn't appear to be affecting anything else and she seems awfully healthy otherwise - just has a very bald head...all around. No rings or new growth anywhere, though, so I'm not positive this is what it is.

    Any guesses? I suppose without a picture it's probably tricky to tell. It isn't a healthy head like it was shaved off with a razor - it looks like it has some kind of skin disease...which is why I thought of ringworm...and it's ONLY affecting her head, nowhere else. Just as bouncy and happy as normal otherwise...

    Help?

    Sarah
     
  2. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Kinda weird only one lamb getting it, still not a bad guess. You probably know all you can about ring worm, did the Lamisil help the goats? Is it a nursing lamb? Have you checked the ewes udder? Could be a number of things, but what is odd is it's just the one. The only off the wall thought are the Orf type diseases, that the rest may have an imunity against. Not much help sorry
     

  3. Sarah J

    Sarah J Well-Known Member

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    Brought the bottle babies home today, too. We had separated out Pearl into the older sheep pen a week or two previously, and weaned her - she is older and it was time. But they'd been together for a couple of months. NOW I am seeing small spots of missing hair on the tops of the other two lambs' heads, too. YEP - ringworm. Went to the vet and got a solution to use full-strength on Pearl and diluted on the other two (obviously their case isn't so bad). He confirmed the diagnosis since I had one of them with me at the time.

    But I'm also now concerned that the older sheep will pick it up, too...Pearl is kind of a loaner, being much younger and smaller than the others, but she's still been near them...I suppose we just watch and wait and see, right?

    Sarah
     
  4. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Ring Worm isn't really a worm it's a fungus (if I remember right) Your other beasts could be imune to it or may come down with it as well. Not much you can do unfortunantly. On the other hand its not usually a big problem either.
     
  5. Sarah J

    Sarah J Well-Known Member

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    Yes, you're right - it's a fungus and highly contagious to animals *and* people. I've never met an animal who was immune. There are several things that one can do to take care of it - all topical. Sunlight is really the best thing for it - keeping it exposed to sunlight will help. Any anti-fungal ointment, cream or spray usually works. I'll be using Lamisil on the two little lambs with just a couple of spots - that took care of the goats within a few days and their hair started growing back. The older lamb with the bald head will be getting a full-strength dose of Novasan (sp?) twice this week and again next week. After that, we'll cut it back to the recommended dilution for another week or two until we notice the hair growing back. At that point it's pretty much done.

    I was just as glad to find out what it was for sure, rather than treat for something that may or may not be helpful! :)

    -Sarah
     
  6. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    It is nice to know what you're dealing with too. Ring worm is an oddity though. We have once with the cattle never to see it again (so far) I once read you can treat with most any topical treatmetn and it will improve in 10-14 days or you can leave it and it will improve in 10-14 days. Rather cynical to me.
     
  7. Sarah J

    Sarah J Well-Known Member

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    Huh. So if I just leave it the heck alone and let it run it's course, it'll go away on it's own??? I suppose it'll also leave big bald patches of scalp in its wake...not necessarily a desireable thing in a lamb you intend to shear for it's wool, eh? :haha:

    I may do some more research on that - I'd never really considered just leaving it alone! But I'm one of those who believes in natural cures - if sunshine can help (which everything says it does!), then stick them in the sun! If leaving it alone cures it, then leave it alone...If a clove of garlic will take care of it, then get that garlic out. :)

    I'll see what else I can dig up on the subject of ringworm...we haven't had it here in four years, ever since the cat brought it home one night...treated everyone here (people and animals) and it dissappeared until now.

    Sarah
     
  8. havenberryfarm

    havenberryfarm Well-Known Member

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    Be careful about the amount of sunlight, tho. Some fungal medications can make the skin more sensitive to UV rays. Be sure to check the bottle.