Ringing Pigs

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by Old John, Jun 23, 2005.

  1. Old John

    Old John Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hi Y'all,

    Just a curious question DSW Sharon & I were talking about, last night.
    Do folks still "Ring Pigs' noses" to keep them from rooting under fences
    or digging holes?
    I can remember when I was a kid my Uncles would put a couple rings
    in each pig's nose when we were cutting & vaccinating them. They'd
    squeeeze the rings with a special pliers.
    I just got to wondering if that's still done.

    I know Folks still put Rings in Bull-noses, for control.
    Thanks.
     
  2. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    With so many nerve endings in a pig's nose (imagine getting a ring in yours and not understanding what it was) I think it is inhumane.
     

  3. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    I agree Marcia. Hogs are created to root. Run an electric wire around the bottom or stake it down where they can't get under it.
     
  4. emke

    emke Well-Known Member

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    We use rings in our pigs noses. After the initial squealing and learning what it is for the pigs no longer root. They get plenty of good food from us without having to dig for it.

    It may sound inhuman, but we have also been known to cut the rooters off a hog's nose if it is notorious for ripping out the rings, which some do. Not many, but enough to know to cut the rooter off.

    Do you not think they can feel the castration either? Or do you leave yours boars???
     
  5. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Hi John, and yes - and for the same reasons that your uncles did it. It is winter here and five of my seven sows have lost their rings. You want to see the mess the paddock is in (or perhaps you don't want to :D ) As soon as we get a dry day, the lot will be brought into the yards and rung.

    The pigs snout is actually a floating disc of cartilage tied to muscle and doesn't have too much in the way of nerve endings at all which is why a lot of pigs continue to shallow root even after they have been rung.

    For persistant diggers, they have the main ring and a series of smaller ones across the top of the snout. That puts paid to their antics. I don't castrate my boars as anything destined for the freezer is in it by 5 months.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  6. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Why get defensive? It is my opinion. You stated yours. BTW, no I don't castrate. I don't cut teeth, dock tails, wean prematurely or do anything else that I consider inhumane (imo). I allow the animals that will be giving their life for my family, to have as natural a life, including fresh species appropriate feed, natural diversions, and their own family, as I am able to give.
     
  7. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    Yes they can feel it, and no I do not castrate the boars, If I dont want them breeding I put them in the freezer. I realize they are livestock and some people may not have the space to pasture pigs and may give them good food, but rooting is a more primal instinct for pigs than sex, and man do they have an instict for that! They root before they have sex, and they root when they are old enough they no longer are interested in sex. To claim they cant feel it or dont care about it (whether you are talking about rings or castration) is just being ignorant. They are a biologic organism with a central nervous system. Smell is their main sensory organ, an analogy to humans would be to be poked in the eye every time you looked at something your preacher (not you) found offensive



     
  8. emke

    emke Well-Known Member

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    I was always told the meat was "strong" if you didn't castrate. Is this not true? We now castrate males as soon as they are weaned, because we had a tiny uncastrated boar get 4 sows PG. Unless he stood on a stump, or they stood in a hole, I don't know how he "caught" them. Since we hate feeding more pigs than what we will eat, is the main reason we castrate.

    I didn't mean to sound defensive. It just gets to me when someone thinks something I do is inhuman. To each their own I guess. I'm sorry if I misunderstood your message. We will just do things our way and I will just state our reasons without any rude comments next time.

    I'm REALLY interested in the answer to the strong meat. DH once castrated a 450 pound boar because we were told the meat would be strong if he wasn't castrated. It was a major hassle that I would rather not do again if the meat would taste the same. Also about bulls vs. steer also. Any particular reason to castrate, besides the fact that a bull is harder to handle??
     
  9. trappmountain

    trappmountain Well-Known Member

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    I at this point have any problem with destructive rooting. We have a pet pot belly pig. He is only 10 weeks old and only roots a little at this point. If it got destructive and I didn't have any luck giving him a special rooting area he was aloud to have at it in I would have no problem putting rings in his nose. But I have pelnty of space to give him a good rooting area and we will see how it goes. I would hate to inhibit his natural behavior but don't we do that with dogs all of the time? We teach them to behave in a manner that is acceptable to us. Curb many of their their natural habits.