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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does any one know how to grow rice in kansas ? We would like to grow long grain or brown .
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
interesting paper you listed if their rice produces human proteins and humans consume it, doesn't that make them cannibals? Sounds like a codex alimentarius product to me. I doubt there are any farms producing anything but milo and wheat around us. Most farmers don't really think outside the welfare check here. Plus I wont be told what I can and cant grow for my family to eat. . but really, rant aside I only want enough to feed my family and it wouldn't affect them at all.
I just sprouted some seed indoors ,it was whole grain brown rice, next Ill try it in different soil in the greenhouse it seems like it likes lots of water and I have a marshy area in full sun that Id like to use. I'm taking soil from that location and trying a small plot 3'x3' in the greenhouse Ill see how it goes. In all it wouldn't be more than 1/2 an acre. Not ever seeing it being cultivated or harvested it might be interesting for us. I've seen on tv people putting plugs in the ground that was marshy but don't know if the water has to be moving or if it could be slightly stagnant and what ph is best
sorry for the rant.
 

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any farms producing anything but milo and wheat around us. Most farmers don't really think outside the welfare check here. .
Bet you are really popular with the neighbors.:flame:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
well my rants aside, I was just hoping someone knew more about growing rice in kansas, so I wouldn't have to make blunders the first year. Its just part of our program of not using walmart for all our needs. Alot of the farmers here have gotten into trouble with all the programs they offer including my neighbors and family. and my family will admit its the free hand outs that got them there. I have helped my neighbors time and time again and even though we farm different we still are close and we've gotten to the point were we joke about our short comings and decisions we make no big deal.
 

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if you learn good stuff, will you post back? My dh keeps asking me if we can grow 'eating' rice in our front swampy area. thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I surely will.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Heres a company that is in your state that sells the seed for wild rice. although I bought some from Bobs red mill that sprouted just fine.

Wildlife nurseries, inc.
P.O. Box 2724 Osh kosh ,
Wisconsin 54903-2724
phone 920-231-3780

20.00$ for 2 qts. or by the bushel
40$ for 100 plants.

This is a little less money than Bobs red mill.We have also sprouted Lundbergs- wehani whole grain rice its a little more money than Bobs red mill.
 

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I read where rice in Texas produced between 6000 and 7000 pounds per acre. That makes about 7 or 8 lbs per square foot if I did my math right. For your families own use, the container idea might just be a good one. You could plant just a few square feet and feed them all year! Now ya'll got me thinking! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
wow thats alot of rice per acre better rethink my plot.
did they say how much seed per acer and I wonder what type of rice wild or brown?
 

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I planted rice last spring, and it did not bloom until November. I have heard that some varieties are short season, but, this was the seed that I had!

I just started some on the windowsill last week. It might do better!
 

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I read where rice in Texas produced between 6000 and 7000 pounds per acre. That makes about 7 or 8 lbs per square foot if I did my math right. For your families own use, the container idea might just be a good one. You could plant just a few square feet and feed them all year! Now ya'll got me thinking! :)
In other words, assuming a 50 pound bushel (IAnd I know it is probably not!), that is abou 120 - 140 bushels per acre.

And, 6000 divided by 43,560 = about one tenth pound per square foot, yes?
 

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You're right, I did my math backwards. According to the Uncle Bens box in my pantry, a serving size is 1/3 cup dry per person. A package that feeds my family of five is 4 oz dry. So you would need just about two square feet per meal for a family of five or eight square feet per pound. I think that math is right.
 

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Heres a company that is in your state that sells the seed for wild rice. although I bought some from Bobs red mill that sprouted just fine.

Wildlife nurseries, inc.
P.O. Box 2724 Osh kosh ,
Wisconsin 54903-2724
phone 920-231-3780
yup, had already looked into them for seeding wild rice around our pond. Turns out that our spring-fed pond is too cold for wild rice to germinate there. If cress will grow then wild rice will not, according to the very nice people at wildlife nurseries.

The 'table rice' would be grown in an area that we'd have to intentionally create and flood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
what a bummer. is it too cool for all rices? are you zone 3-4? what temp is the spring water? we're zone 4 and our spring water is 55 all growing season our swampy area is probably 70 -80 in the summer.I might not be able to grow either need more info.

Terri do you know what kind you grew in kansas?
 

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For wild rice the water needs to get above 50degrees for the wild rice to germinate. Our only real waterway/seeding area at the moment is a spring-fed pond that runs 42 degrees year round.

We're zone 4b/5a - but for whatever reason the immediate area is known for super cold, crystal clear spring water and abundant high quality trout fishing in those super cold crystal clear streams. Water moves very fast.
 

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When we visited the Echo Farm demonstration garden in N Fort Myers last spring, they showed us rice being grown in a regu;ar garden. According to them, the flooding during the early stage is to keep weeds down. Of course, it has become a cycle- flooded paddy grows fish and feeds ducks, until the rice is almost ready to harvest and the water is allowed to drain or evaporate off.
 
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