reverse osmosis-> any opinions?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by fmkjr, Jul 17, 2005.

  1. fmkjr

    fmkjr Member

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    My wife and I are considering a reverse osmosis system for our home. We have a filter on the well that (filters nearly everything or so the box says) plus a water softner. Between the two all the sulfer smell is gone and any issues with iron deposits in the sink etc...

    We are considering purchasing a reverse osmosis system that would we would hook to the fridge. Any thoughts, opinions on brands, etc.

    Our water has been tested and no issues with it... I am attempting to rid the water of the salt from the softner and get as pure a water as possible.

    For the most part we only drink water or green tea. No soda. Thus, this is our main source of fluids.
    thanks
    frank
     
  2. westbrook

    westbrook In Remembrance

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    Frank,

    We are on our second system from Costco. The first system lasted 15 years and I am sure the only reason we needed another system (new) is because my husband couldn't figure out what was wrong ... He can change the filter with no problem.

    Ours is hooked to both our refrigerator as well as kitchen sink. We have been very pleased with the system.
     

  3. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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    A reverse osmosis system still has to use something to draw the impurities out. Don't they use salt, too?
     
  4. TimandPatti

    TimandPatti Texas

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    The reverse osmosis method of drinking water treatment has long been regarded as one of the most efficient ways to reduce impurities.
    Water passes through an efficient pre-filter that removes the larger particles of dirt and debris. Then, the water is squeezed through microscopic pores in the reverse osmosis membrane eliminating up to 99% of the impurities. Finally, the carbon post filter removes objectionable tastes and odors to enhance the quality of your drinking water.

    The principal uses of reverse osmosis in Minnesota and the Dakotas are for the reduction of high levels of nitrate, sulfate, sodium and total dissolved solids.
     
  5. fmkjr

    fmkjr Member

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    Did you buy yours online? I have seen one in the store (and I shop their too often...) Was it fairly simple to hook up?
     
  6. WanderingOak

    WanderingOak Well-Known Member

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    When I was in the Navy, we had a RO plant. It was able to filter seawater into potable water. The only problem was that we couldn't use it in coastal waters because even small amounts of petrolium would damage the filter membrane. If I remember correctly, there was a saline 'slurry' of everything that was filtered that had to be discharged overboard. Again, this could not be done in coastal waters due to environmental regulations. I believe the home-based systems have to do something similar, discharging into your septic or sewer. I have no idea about what volume this discharge would be.
     
  7. fmkjr

    fmkjr Member

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    I found this one on costco's web site:
    http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?prodid=10034720&whse=&topnav=&cat=&s=1
    It has zero water waste... not sure how it would work but it seems interesting...

    The others state they have 4-5 gal of waste per day...

    I talked to the folks that service our well and they were explaining the difference between the ones bought at "home depot" and some online stores compared to theirs... they charge $600 for their unit installed. $425 for the unit without installation... they claim their system produces a better water... ? They are having literature sent to me...

    Home depot, costco's (cheaper model) and such range from $150-200...
    I do not know if the difference is worth the price...
     
  8. kmaproperties

    kmaproperties Well-Known Member

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    I don't know how the new osmosis units work but the ones we looked into 10 years ago used 10 gallons of rinse water to make one gallon of filtered water.
    so 10 gallons of water down the septic system to produce one drinking gallon.
    thats not very good water conservation. and if you are on city water you are paying water and sewer charges for the 10 gallons.
     
  9. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If that Costco unit really doesn't have any waste water, I will be thinking of getting one for my house. The drawback to me has always been the amount of waste water dumped down the drain, and the waste water contains all of the contaminants that were taken from the "good" water that is the product of the system, the water that is purified for use. I wonder where the contaminants go if the Costco unit isn't dumping any water??

    Jim
     
  10. fmkjr

    fmkjr Member

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    I have the same question... what happens to the water?
    We have a well and recently "tapped" into city sewage... or shall I say they tapped into my back pocket...
     
  11. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well, I did a little searching on the internet, and what they do is pump the waste water into the water heater, so that the concentrated waste water is added to the water that you bathe and wash in.

    I would call that deceptive advertising.

    Jim
     
  12. WanderingOak

    WanderingOak Well-Known Member

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    Right. If you were using it to remove the water softener salts, then you will essentially be showering in a concentrated solution of chemicals. What you might want to do (if you are a creative plumber), is have a large enough holding tank for the waste water and use that to flush your toilets.
     
  13. fmkjr

    fmkjr Member

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    wow... that is deceptive...
    There is alot of salt that is pulled out... by mistake (I had to bypass the discharge of my softner while working on a direct connect to the sewage in the basement) I discharged the water into my sump pump which discharged to the grass next to the porch... My wife started asking what happened to the grass... I thought it must have been from the box from the new tub in the basement bath... and maybe I left it on the grass too long and caused it to "yellow"... it continued to get worse and finally I figured it out... the salt from the softner is "burning" the grass... duh!

    I finished my direct connection before completely destroying the side yard... :bash: