Results of feeding kudzu hay

Discussion in 'Goats' started by farmmom, Sep 14, 2010.

  1. farmmom

    farmmom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,090
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2009
    Location:
    South Carolina
    I recently picked up 40 bales of kudzu hay. My 4 does share 2 flakes a day while my buck is separated during feeding time. (For those who don't know, kudzu in high in protein and calcium, very similar to alfalfa.) I have noticed, starting the day after the first taste of kudzu, that milk production went up and the amount of cream really increased to the point that it takes much longer to strain the milk. The taste of the milk is great!

    I paid $4/bale in comparison to the $15-20/bale that alfalfa sells for around here, with better results. From what the man I buy feed from tells me, the large amount of vines in the hay, which of course provides a lot of roughage, is what is increasing the cream production.
     
  2. Cannon_Farms

    Cannon_Farms Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    4,639
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2008
    Location:
    Monroe Ga
    my husband brought home some kudzu from work, the goat ran over like OMGOSH, got to it sniffed and turned away, friggin pains in the you know whats
     

  3. farmmom

    farmmom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,090
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2009
    Location:
    South Carolina
    My goats LOVE it!!!
     
  4. Cannon_Farms

    Cannon_Farms Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    4,639
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2008
    Location:
    Monroe Ga
    my goats are on my poop list, i thought goats just might not like kudzu
     
  5. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

    Messages:
    6,244
    Joined:
    May 11, 2003
    Location:
    Arkansas
    I brought some home before and my goats made it disappear in three seconds flat. They LOVED it! I am dying to try and grow some for my goats.

    Farmmom, I can't believe you have kudzu hay there, so jealous. Do you know anything about how to bale it? I remember reading it's hard to cut and stuff because it's a vine.
     
  6. farmmom

    farmmom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,090
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2009
    Location:
    South Carolina
    Copied from backyardnature.net

    For example, when you're baling Kudzu hay, "Set your header 'low' and cut vines low. Then when you go back to bale, set the header 'high.' If a round baler is available, the kudzu twines itself and does not require baling twine."


    The man I bought it from has 15 acres dedicated to growing kudzu. His mom goes out and picks the blossoms for honey, uses young leaves in quishe (sp?) and in place of spinach in any recipe.
     
  7. Missy M

    Missy M Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    500
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2007
    Location:
    Kentucky
    Here in KY kudzu is everywhere. It is distructive and the folks would probably pay you to get rid of it. If you plant it make sure you are prepared to manage it, it grows like crazy and will kill any plant or tree it grows over. It's good to know how goats do on it, I'm thinking of goats and this would be an easy food source.
     
  8. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm This Space For Rent Supporter

    Messages:
    47,698
    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2006
    Location:
    Eastern North Carolina
  9. saanengirl

    saanengirl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,359
    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2009
    Location:
    Southern Indiana
    Goats tend to be very hesitant about trying new foods. If you let them get used to the kudzu they would probably eat it (particularly if they didn't have a lot of other choices). Most people don't realize how picky goats can be.
     
  10. Heritagefarm

    Heritagefarm Liberal Basket Brain Supporter

    Messages:
    13,572
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Location:
    Southern MO
    There's park around here, one time I went on a picnic, and there was roughly an acre of the stuff. A week later, I went on a campout at that same place, and it'd spread another couple yards, easy.
     
  11. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm This Space For Rent Supporter

    Messages:
    47,698
    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2006
    Location:
    Eastern North Carolina
    http://www.lib.niu.edu/2000/oi000208.html
     
  12. Kazahleenah

    Kazahleenah Disgruntled citizen

    Messages:
    4,458
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2004
    Location:
    Northeast Michigan zone 4b
  13. jbowyer01

    jbowyer01 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    644
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2008
    Location:
    Georgia
    I need to post pics of my drive home lol. Thats what about 65 miles of my drive looks like.
     
  14. mrs.H

    mrs.H Romans 8:28

    Messages:
    1,098
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2003
    Location:
    N. GA
    We have places like that around here too!
     
  15. mamajohnson

    mamajohnson Knitting Rocks! Supporter

    Messages:
    5,783
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2002
    Location:
    North East Texas
    When my son graduated from Army boot camp in Georgia several years ago we were amazed and appalled at all the Kudzu.

    Now, in a town not 6 miles from us, and along railroad tracks about half that distance, there is Kudzu everywhere. I am thinking my goats will become self defense when that stuff gets here. I am sure it will get here, just not sure when. It scares me. But, when it is closer I will be proactive, and make lemonade out of those lemons!
    Sounds like the milk will even benefit. But I would never ever try to grow it on purpose.
     
  16. SteelRose

    SteelRose Member

    Messages:
    11
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2010
    Location:
    AL
    I live in Alabama... The stuff is EVERYWHERE here... it reminds me of living up in the pacific nw only there its black berries...good to know that goats will eat kudzu though...

    Is there anything else you can do with kudzu?
     
  17. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

    Messages:
    8,818
    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2006
    Location:
    S.E.Alabama
    in places that already have Kudzu it is worth utilizeing, its a great feed for Goats, Cattle, Sheep, Rabbits, even chickens will eat the leaves, but if you dont already have it DO NOT INTRODUCE it to someplace that its not already, it has alot of uses yes but it also will take over and your neahbors wont like you much for it
     
  18. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

    Messages:
    8,818
    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2006
    Location:
    S.E.Alabama
    its also used in crafts, you can make baskets and all sorts of other things out of the vine if your of a mind too..
     
  19. farmmom

    farmmom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,090
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2009
    Location:
    South Carolina
     
  20. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

    Messages:
    6,244
    Joined:
    May 11, 2003
    Location:
    Arkansas
    My plan was to build cattle panel fence row, like 6-8 ft by however long and plant the kudzu inside it. This would keep the goats from killing it, they could eat it as it tries to escape.

    My granpa planted it a long time ago for his goats and they ate it to the ground and then pawed roots up and ate that too and killed it.