Replace front end loader seal?

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by Rockin'B, Oct 3, 2006.

  1. Rockin'B

    Rockin'B Well-Known Member

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    I have a Dunham Lear (sp?) front end loader on my Ford 4000.

    The right side hydraulic ram is leaking quite badly and needs a new seal.

    How difficult is this job? Better for the shop to do it, or not so bad?

    Thanks.

    '
     
  2. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

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    the seal on the end cap is fairly easy to replace if the cap will slide off the shaft. If you have to take the cylinder apart, and take the packing off the piston to slide the cap off that end it is quite a job. The seals on the cylinder piston are called packing. At least that is what we call them. They are quite a pain. The seals, or packing, are directional if you have a loader with down pressure. There are actually 2 sets of seals seperated by a heavy washer. One set is angeled one way for lifting the loader, and the other set is angeled the other way for down pressure. When you try to put the piston with the packing on it back in the cylinder one set of seals are angeled toward the opening of the cylinder. They dont want to go in. Its like trying to push a fish in a container tail first. so you have to be carefull when you tuck those ageled seals in the cylinder.
     

  3. Rockin'B

    Rockin'B Well-Known Member

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    My loader would have a two way seal. I think I'll make a call and see how much it would cost to have it done. I have too many things to do rather than fight with that seal.

    Thanks for the info.
     
  4. mohillbilly

    mohillbilly Well-Known Member

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    I have rebuilt many hydraulic cylinders...some are more of a pain than others...but all have worked well when completed, they are simple in operation and easy to repair IMO....the ones i have rebiult have been in continuous operation on production lines for years....Just take your time, pay attention to the way they come apart and put them back together the same. work in a fairly clean enviorment, and you will hace success............