Repairing sheet rock before painting?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by connie in WV, Oct 5, 2005.

  1. connie in WV

    connie in WV Site Admin's Boss

    Messages:
    481
    Joined:
    May 13, 2002
    Location:
    West Virginia!
    I just stripped off some wall paper in our bathroom. In several spots the thin top layer of the sheet rock came off as well and has slightly rough edges.

    What can I do to the sheet rock so that it's smooth enough for paint? I don't want these spots showing through. Is this what primer is for?
     
  2. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,274
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2003
    Location:
    Colorado
    If the texture is significantly different, primer will not improve the appearance. You could put on the primer and let it dry. If it doesn't look right, put a thin coat spackle over the area with a large overlap onto the good drywall surface. Feather it with sandpaper and prime again. Spackle will cover even large blemishes.
     

  3. Old Jack

    Old Jack Truth Seeker

    Messages:
    232
    Joined:
    May 21, 2004
    Location:
    West Virginia
    You could probably use drywall mud as well.
     
  4. Chuck

    Chuck Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    3,286
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2003
    Location:
    WV
    Ugh! I was afraid of that! Dry wall mud is not my specialty. Usually I have ended up just texturing the wall to cover my handy work. I will try extra hard to keep it thin. Hopefully that will help. Thanks!
     
  5. connie in WV

    connie in WV Site Admin's Boss

    Messages:
    481
    Joined:
    May 13, 2002
    Location:
    West Virginia!
    Oops! That last post was mine! Not Chuck's. :rolleyes:
     
  6. Old Jack

    Old Jack Truth Seeker

    Messages:
    232
    Joined:
    May 21, 2004
    Location:
    West Virginia
    Just take your time and remember, less is more, build it up with thin coats.
     
  7. tallpines

    tallpines Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,283
    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2003
    Location:
    A woods in Wisconsin
    And---if it gets too thick---have extra sandpaper on hand.
     
  8. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,274
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2003
    Location:
    Colorado
    Drywall mud = spackle.

    Ready mixed may be a little more difficult to get a thin layer. Powdered can be mixed thin. I suppose you could add a little water to a bucket of ready mixed, but you would have to do that in a different container. Be carefull, it doesn't take much water to make a big difference in the consistency. I like the powdered stuff, because it stores indefinitely, is fairly easy to mix to a consistency you like, and easy to adjust by adding more mix or water. Ready mixed stores well closed, but after you open it, it eventually isn't good. It may be difficult to estimate how much you need.

    Get a large spackle blade - 8-10 inches, instead of a putty knife. Sand paper makes a lot of dust, but you can also use a damp sponge. With a little practice you can almost duplicate textures. A sponge will remove a lot if it is too damp or if you stay in one area too long. Let it dry completely before you sponge it.
     
  9. connie in WV

    connie in WV Site Admin's Boss

    Messages:
    481
    Joined:
    May 13, 2002
    Location:
    West Virginia!
    I've always used ready made so making it thin sounds good. Now that you mention the sponge trick, I remember hearing that before. Ok...I feel confident!
     
  10. texican

    texican Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,327
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2003
    Location:
    Carthage, Texas
    if it's a small area, you might try the vinyl spackle...comes in little containers...great for touch up jobs...no mixing...cures without shrinkage, so you don't have to do multiple layers...just daub some on, and smooth it out...sand later if it needs it...and paint over... quickest and cheapest, and works great for clients who don't want to pay me to come back several times for a five minute remud/sand job...
     
  11. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    7,154
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    If all else fails you can hang pictures and calenders over the spots that you flubbed up. Maybe that picture of your mother-in-law.
     
  12. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    833
    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2003
    Location:
    Vancouver, and Moberly Lake, BC, Canada
    Apply three THIN coats of mud -- feathering each futher out as needed, then you lightly sand, prime and paint.

    Do NOT put too much mud on. The professional drywallers, of which I am not one, hardly sand at all, but they come back three times to barely touch the wall with mud. They are amazing.

    The rest of us seem to think, "The more mud the better, smear it on." Of course then we spend weeks sanding it off, in a cloud of toxic lung-plugging dust.

    Good Luck,

    Alex
     
  13. MaryNY

    MaryNY Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    915
    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2004
    Location:
    New York
    Around here it's called "joint compound" and that ain't spackle! Works really really well, too. You can even fill in the cracks in plywood paneling so you can't tell they are there! Good luck!
     
  14. BlueRidge

    BlueRidge Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    202
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Location:
    Virginia
    I hate working with drywall, so I've watched the pros to try to learn how to get it over with.

    Lesson #1 for me: Don't try to make it perfect with the taping knife. If you leave little ridges, that's fine. Don't spend 4 days and 3 nights trying to get rid of them. They'll sand off in about 30 seconds once they are dry.