relocating nest box

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by Ddunk1026, May 11, 2005.

  1. Ddunk1026

    Ddunk1026 Active Member

    Messages:
    35
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2005
    Location:
    Central Illinois
    I have heard that in order to prevent the doe from smashing the babies, carrying them out on accident, and harsh weather conditions you should relocate the nest box outside of the cage. I would like to know if anyone has tried this and did it work well. Where is the best place to keep the nest box? Does temperature matter much? When should I put the box back in the cage with the mother? Is this going to bother the mother? Thanks for any input!
     
  2. dale anne

    dale anne Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    329
    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2004
    Location:
    arkansas
    howdy....i never heard that before...but interesting....i dont remove my nest box until the kits are getting out by themselves...when it is real hot if the kits have hair i will remove almost all the hay except for in one corner of the box so they have a choice to get under it....i have only had a mother crush her kits after they have got out of the box and i have 7 does that i keep bred to 6 months out of the year...i wont breed when to hot or in winter....i sure would like to hear if someone does this and what problems prompted them to do so.....dale anne
     

  3. Ddunk1026

    Ddunk1026 Active Member

    Messages:
    35
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2005
    Location:
    Central Illinois
    sorry, i guess i didnt make myself totally clear. I meant take the nest box out, babies and all and only putting them back in about once a day for the mother to nurse.
     
  4. Meg Z

    Meg Z winding down

    Messages:
    3,471
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2004
    Location:
    NC
    I doubt that any commercial meat breeders do that. It's fairly common among show breeders. Since a doe only nurses her young once or twice a day, the nest box is removed from the cage, kits and all, and returned twice a day for feeding. The kits are handled regularly by humans to make them more managable for showing. It also prevents any loss from kits being accidently pulled out of the nest after nursing mom, and any loss due to mom getting stressed and killing babies.

    The nest boxes are often brought into the house, to keep control of the temperature, which is important. Don't want either cooked or chilled babies!

    Lots of Angora breeders do this. I don't. One of the traits I want to instill in my rabbits is good mothering, and if I don't let them do it, how will I know? :confused:

    Meg
     
  5. Tucker

    Tucker Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    321
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2005
    Location:
    NC

    I raise NZ X's , Cal X's and ESX "s ,, We raise just for home use ,, but in the winter when its bad cold ,, especially during the nite ,, I bring in nestboxes
    from the day of birth ,, I'll go out at nite bring in any nestboxes ,, put in the bathroom or landry room ,, till the babies have fur ,, about a week or so ??

    by doing this ,, I save any that might have gotten pulled out of the nest on at tit or any that somehow 'hop' out too early ,, lol

    I take out first thing in the morning for the does to nurse ,, and if its good enough weather I'll leave all day but I'll bring in at nite ,, I'm out at the shed enough during the day to rescue in time,, any kit that has gotten out of the nest somehow ,,

    if you had a lot of does I don't think it would be easy to do all of them ,, I do know of breeders that will just put the nestbox into an empty cage ,, they don't bring them inside ,, if they have a doe that has a tendency to sit in the nest and stomp kits ??

    but I agree with Meg ,, how can you tell if a doe is a good mom if you don't let her mother ??
     
  6. Rosarybeads

    Rosarybeads Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    544
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2004
    Location:
    Kansas
    You can also set them on top of the cage, but unless you have a good reason to do all this hand work, it probably isn't worth it. You would save time by getting a drop box instead, and not having to worry about the babies getting out and dying. If it is cold, you could bring the box in, if the mother is clutzy, you could put it on top of her cage. Generally, wouldn't use it, unless you have some major show rabbits or something. :)