relocating honeybees......

Discussion in 'Beekeeping' started by cdrgrvfm, Jul 13, 2005.

  1. cdrgrvfm

    cdrgrvfm New Member

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    Va
    We are performing a remodel/renovation on a house built in the mid 1700's. There is what I assume to be a fairly large hive inside one of the exterior walls. This will have to come down at some point, but I would like to know if anyone is interested in relocating these honeybees to a better place. I am not a beekeeper, so I have no idea what's involved, but I really would like to save them. Especially before anyone gets an idea of using a large bottle of RAID.

    Stephanie
    In Virginia
     
  2. WayneH

    WayneH Active Member

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    Location:
    KY
    Someone will want them. Heck! I live in Kentucky and I'm tempted!

    Your local Extension Agent should be able to connect you with someone.
     

  3. indypartridge

    indypartridge Well-Known Member Supporter

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  4. cdrgrvfm

    cdrgrvfm New Member

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    Well, I emailed a couple of people who are part of associations close to us. I received a response back from one person (requesting money to do this) and now I am wondering whether I had made myself clear. What I was really wanting is someone with their own hive who was looking for some native bees to just come and take them, enjoy them, prosper, etc....

    Is it common practice for someone to charge for this type of removal? I understand if they were a nuisance to me and I would need to call an exterminator, but my husband is a contractor remodeling this home that noone has lived in for 20 years. I was just thinking someone would come and pick them up.

    Stephanie
     
  5. cdrgrvfm

    cdrgrvfm New Member

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    I received this response back from an extension agent in a neighboring county and quite frankly I am just at a loss.

    "Generally killing the colony is the most practical course to follow. The
    value of the colony in dollars is far less than the labor and risk of
    draining the bees into a colony which is supported near the entry
    hole. Once the bees are killed, some carpentry may need to occur to remove
    the wax and honey which will soon deteriorate, or you can hope that mice,
    wax moths, etc. do this task for you."

    Now unless my reading and research has been completely wrong, I was under the impression that native bee colonies were being destroyed by several factors. PLEASE, somebody correct me if I am wrong and blowing this out of proportion. I was hoping I was doing something good here, but turns out everyone thinks I am looking for an exterminator or looking to make money off the hive. I was just hoping someone knowledgable might be able to save this hive.

    Stephanie
     
  6. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Well-Known Member Supporter

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    From a beekeepers perspective, you can buy a new colony for about $70 or so. It comes with a queen and all, usually guaranteed. No fuss, no muss.

    Contrast that to the hours of work and the tremendous mess of pulling a hive from the walls of a house. And there's no guarantee you'll get the queen. Economically, it doesn't make sense.
     
  7. WayneH

    WayneH Active Member

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    Apr 29, 2005
    Location:
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    Is it possible to leave where they are? If nothing else it could be a conversation piece!

    Well, I'd still hate for the hive to be wiped out, they could be pest resistant strain. I've been hoping nature will balance out the mite problem by itself.

    You could try chasing them out of the hive with mothballs or something. It's getting late in the season, but they should still have time to establish a hive somewhere else.