Reloading....what exactly do I need??

Discussion in 'The Great Outdoors' started by oz in SC, Jan 9, 2007.

  1. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    I want to reload for my .308 rifle and .38/.357 pistol.

    What EXACTLY do I need?

    I went and looked at a few reloaders but hav eNO idea what I am looking at. :shrug:
     
  2. Steve L.

    Steve L. Well-Known Member

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    What aspect of shooting do you want to affect? Do you want to save money, improve performance, shoot more, or just waste time/money (like I do)?
     

  3. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    Save money...I am cheap.:D

    Milsurp .308 is through the roof and is not getting any cheaper.
     
  4. beowoulf90

    beowoulf90 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Here's a short list

    1. Lyman or Speers or one of the many other reloading manuals.
    2. Reloader (RCBS, Lyman, Dillion just to name a few)
    3. Dies for the caliber to be reloaded.
    4. Powder scale
    5. powder trickler
    6. either a micrometer or a gauge to check length of shell
    7. case/shell trimmer
    8. depending on the dies you may need case lube and pad.
    9. a good solid work bench to mount the reloader on.

    Like I said this is just a short list and I would start with the reloading manuals

    This is a list I posted sometime ago in another thread called "What reloading Equipment".
     
  5. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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  6. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    The first thing that you need Oz is some good reloading manuals.Or maybe videos...as they are now on DVDs.After that, the equipment will be fairly obvious. Unless you shoot an awful lot, I doubt that you'll be able to save much on.308 on cost/round. .38/.357 could be different. Aside from the manuals... expect to spend $250-$??? to get started. Good Luck & be Very Careful!
     
  7. Steve L.

    Steve L. Well-Known Member

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    Good list.

    1. Lyman or Speers or one of the many other reloading manuals.
    I like Hornaday, myself.
    2. Reloader (RCBS, Lyman, Dillion just to name a few)
    Check out Lee Precision, too. I’ve used quite a bit of their stuff. It’s inexpensive, but ok for the casual re-loader.
    http://www.leeprecision.com/cgi/catalog/browse.cgi?1168371386.3645=/html/index.html
    5. powder trickler
    You can get by without this, but they’re sure nice to have.

    Also,
    Primer flipper
    Powder funnel

    Yep.

    Yea, even if you can ‘roll your own’ for half the price of factory, you’ll have to shoot 600+ rounds to pay for $250 worth of equipment.
     
  8. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    Like Oz, I am trying to get by cheaper, so I been buying up the gear for reloading my little "Dollar a Pop" .25-20 wcf. Sometimes I can get cartridges for $.75 a piece, but figuring a fellow could reload them for $.10 each, reloading is a huge savings.

    Lee has a starter kit for well under $100, and it has nearly everything a person needs, except the dies.
     
  9. hunter63

    hunter63 Well-Known Member

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    You might want to look at the "Lee Loader", every thing done by hand, but you can reload real cheep as you don't need a press.

    Every thing you need is in a box about the size of a pack of smokes. Except the powder, bullets and primers.
    I was even able to get one for my .225 win,(odd cal.)

    Also a good thing to pack in your BOB bag.
    Look them up on the "Lee" site.
    http://www.leeprecision.com/cgi/catalog/browse.cgi?1168371386.3645=/html/catalog/cleeloader.html

    You can use this to get started then decide if you want to go into full presses, better equiptment etc.
     
  10. shadowwalker

    shadowwalker Well-Known Member

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    Oz what Hunter63 said is true. I got them in 300 mag, 30'06, 44mag,223,45acp. It is a slow process, but good enough to get game. And I find it relaxing. All do good for me. I also have a rcbs system for reloading for all my guns which I have used for over 35 years. It is the way to go if loading a few hundred to thousand rounds. but here in tennessee. That much ammo is hard to shoot off at one time with out people showing up. "Looking" around.
     
  11. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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  12. hunter63

    hunter63 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Haggis, I just ordered one of these kits.
    I have the 7mm mag, .225 win, .44mag lee loaders, case trimmer and several measuring spoons, and I just had found the regular loading die set for the .225.
    Still like these sets as they are only 26.00 bucks.

    I had been bidding on several presses, but they go fast, and in some cases for more used than you can get them new, but this was a heel of a deal.
     
  13. PyroDon

    PyroDon Well-Known Member

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    I use a lee turret press for y 44 ammo and an "orange crusher " for large bottle necked shells .
    Id say get the carbide dies nd a good powder scale
    the reloading manual is a must
     
  14. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    Haggis... I also reload for some of the older,hard to find calibers like .32/20,.38/40, .455, & .45/70, & you can really save some money on these calibers & provide yourself with a reliable,steady source for these fine old cartridges. I also like to reload them because my guns are getting older & I like to know exactly what I'm shooting in them. That little Lee hand loader is how I got started in reloading & it is handy for a BOB.
     
  15. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    .308 is running about $220/1000 for Wolf.

    Surplus is about $300/1000 for good stuff.

    Of course none is actually available from dealers,you are buying it off of an individual.
     
  16. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    Along that same line, I really don't shoot that much, I'm a meat hunter, not a sport shooter, so reloading for me is more an issue of being able to get a cheaper more steady supply of cartridges for my .25-20 wcf, my .45-70 govt., and even my .444 Marlin. As you say, some of these cartridges are hard to find or have seasonal runs, all of which makes them spendy to buy.
     
  17. beowoulf90

    beowoulf90 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I would go to the local gunshop to buy the reloading manuals, but for the actual equipment I would check out the auctions. I've bought many reloading presses from the local auction for pennies on the dollar. I presently have 2 RCBS single stage presses up and running and 3 MEC (2 single stage and 1 progressive) shotshell reloading presses up and running. Now i've been doing this for awhile and have had time to accumalate everything I've needed, but I've bought complete set-up's for $100 or so at auction. Just remember Safety is the first thing....if it seems unsafe don't do it!

    Now I'm looking for a MEC in .410 Ga (for my T/C Contender pistol)
     
  18. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    Okay I am already lost.

    What is single stage?

    What is progressive?
     
  19. beowoulf90

    beowoulf90 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A single stage press only does basicly one function at a time on one shell/case.
    A progressive press handles a few cases/shells (depends on the brand, normally about 4 to 6 cases/shells) and does multible functions at a time for example on a MEC 650 progressive shotshell reloader one pull of the handle does the following.;
    removes the old prime, resizes the shell this is for one shell
    primes another shell
    loads powder and wad on another shell
    adds shot
    crimps the end of another shell..

    Hope that helps.
     
  20. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    Look for those DVDs Oz. Reloading is complicated & can't be learned in a day or a week. Study! & Be Safe!