Redneck Remodeling

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by moopups, Dec 14, 2004.

  1. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

    Messages:
    7,102
    Joined:
    May 12, 2002
    Location:
    In beautiful downtown Sticks, near Belleview, Fl.
    Ayep, I did it; this old shack I live in is so airy that it is impossible to get warn, the reason? The house was built before there was insulation, the plumbing came in after it was built, the drain pipes are on the outside of the walls. It is a low maintaince building, basically no one ever maintained it! There are floor holes in the bathroom, wind rushes around the window frames, enought to blow out a candle. I sleep in the living room, the bedrooms are just too cold.

    A bit ago I noticed a big draft comming in from the north end of the house, this will not do. So I went dumpster diving and got two big pieces of cardboard, bought a roll of duct tape,the rest is history. Ayep, I got me abrand new cardboard and duct tape door for between the LR and the rest of the house! Now to attach the rubber band latch and its keeper nail! Ain't cold no more... ;)
     
  2. insanity

    insanity Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    890
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2004
    Location:
    Clarksville TN.
    Blankets nailed up work well also! ;)
    Lived in an old farm house once.If you can see day light threw the board cracks you got problems! :D That foam insulation spray in a can is awsum.
     

  3. Corgitails

    Corgitails Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    960
    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2003
    I would go buy bales of straw and stack them around the outside of the house. I did that around the garage so I could keep working on projects out there and it's amazing how much difference it makes!
     
  4. chickflick

    chickflick Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    575
    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2003
    Location:
    Texas
    Yes, COrgi.. This might interest you... My Chihuahuas have their 'winter home' made of hay bales inside their big fenced nite nite enclosure!! (They love it!) Year #5 now!! :):)
     
  5. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

    Messages:
    19,568
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2003
    I thought maybe you pulled one of my stunts.Put up a piece of Metal to run my Stove Pipe through.Then put a Tarp over the rest.

    big rockpile
     
  6. cloverfarm

    cloverfarm Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    717
    Joined:
    May 31, 2004
    Location:
    Michiana
    Reading this makes me thankful for what I have ...

    Ann
     
  7. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    7,154
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    You're kidding us ain't you Mitch. We all know it don't get cold in Florry D. My neighbor was just down there, and he said it was 86.
     
  8. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

    Messages:
    7,102
    Joined:
    May 12, 2002
    Location:
    In beautiful downtown Sticks, near Belleview, Fl.
    No teazing here Will, its between 28 to 32 here tonight, was 80's last week. Very cold by our standards.
     
  9. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

    Messages:
    6,844
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    Sometimes the easiest way to insulate an older house like that is to remove the outside wall siding, put insulation in the studs and then put the old wall siding back on again (with vapor barrier plastic first). While the outside wall siding is off, you can also get at plumbing and electric.

    Saw one house in OH done this wall. They just took it one wall at a time, weather permitting.

    Ken Scharabok
     
  10. Grandmotherbear

    Grandmotherbear Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    8,908
    Joined:
    May 14, 2002
    Location:
    Fl Zones 11
    Mitch is absolutely right- cardboard makes a GREAT insulator! One time a church put up my Boy Scout troop overnight- all the floors were concrete and we were freezing- until I found a stash of cardboeard boxes we could flatten out and lay the sleeping bags upon.
     
  11. Ardie/WI

    Ardie/WI Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    15,516
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Here in Wisconsin, we wear insulated long underwear a lot!

    This old place is far less drafty since we replaced the windows. We used to watch the curtains wave on windy days.
     
  12. jack_c-ville

    jack_c-ville Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    144
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Location:
    Virginia
    Have you ever used that insulation-in-a-can called 'Great Stuff'? You should try it. You can get in most any big hardware store. It's a liquid that you spray into little crevices through a tube (like with WD-40) and it turns into an expanding foam that hardens up and sets. It only costs maybe $5 a can and works great for stopping drafts under window frames and spots like that. Much better than the cardboard and about the same cost as the duct tape.

    We don't have any insulation either (except in the attic). To keep the living room warmer when we're heating with the fireplace my wife made a sort of quilted curtain that hangs over the doorway. It work very well.

    -Jack



     
  13. Jan Doling

    Jan Doling Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,898
    Joined:
    May 21, 2004
    Location:
    Zone 9b
    Doesn't get cold in Flory D? Tell that to my geese that keep knocking on the front door when the temp drops below 40! When I lived in the old mobile home, I used an electric blanket at night and a kerosene heater in the living area, which I shut off from the other half of the trailer with a quilt. Getting ready for work in the mornings, I never had time to wait for the kerosene heater so I only used a small electric heater in the bathroom & drank my coffee in there while dressing. My more civilized relatives thought it was a very red-neck thing to do, but I never had to worry about shocking utility bills.
     
  14. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

    Messages:
    6,844
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    My father lived in the Ozarks for a couple of years in his early teens. One of those board and batten houses where they put the boards up and down and then nail a strip over the gap. Green wood so it was drafty. Said if you left a glass of water on the nightstand it would be frozen solid in the morning. Only warm place in the house was behind the kitchen stove. They wore nightgowns and would run from the bed to there and dress under the gown.

    Ken Scharabok