Red Fox with Mange

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Jennifer L., Aug 2, 2006.

  1. Jennifer L.

    Jennifer L. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've been watching a fox all haying from the tractor. I saw him about twice a week, and he seemed a bit ratty but acting normally. The other day he was up at the barn around the chickens, and had taken shelter from the dogs behind some unused rabbit cages. I was able to get him into a cage. He has mange, and quite honestly my reason for working him into the cage was so I would have time to go get the gun and finish him off. However, once I had him in there I started to think maybe he could be treated for the mange and recover. His case is not so advanced that he couldn't be treated, I'm sure.

    I gave him a squirt of Ivomec injectible for cattle in the mouth and some on the skin--figured if it didn't kill him it woud be the way to go. Three days later he's still doing ok, so the ivomectrin isn't going to kill him.

    I can't give him an injection because even though I'm 99% sure he's not rabid, I don't want to handle him just the same. I called a recent retired game warden to check for animal rescue people and he said they'd probably just shoot it themselves and it would cost me to boot. So I'm going to treat him if I can and see if I can cure him.

    Does anyone have any advice for me on treating it?

    Jennifer
     
  2. ladycat

    ladycat Chicken Mafioso Staff Member

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    I gave a lot of garlic to a mangy dog once and it cleared right up. Try mixing LOTS of garlic with his food and see what happens. Doesn't hurt to try, anyhow.
     

  3. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    Make a paste of baby oil and sulpher, but it has to be applied to his body.
     
  4. VALENT

    VALENT Well-Known Member

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    My first suggestion would be to leave the fox alone. But since you're involved anyhow, I would use some of the pour on ivermectin and treat twice about two weeks apart.
     
  5. suburbanite

    suburbanite Well-Known Member

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    Did you try using a search engine like google on 'mange treatment'? It looks like there are a lot of options.

    If you are willing to pay for a vet visit you could get your fox treated for mange, dewormed, and vaccinated against all the things that he's likely to get or give to your dogs. If he's not otherwise causing problems for you this would be better than killing him because he'll claim your place as his turf and other foxes will be deterred from coming in.

    There are people who keep foxes as pets. I doubt you could do that with an adult wild fox. But you can probably train/condition your fox to avoid certain behaviors (like, going near the henhouse)--when domestic they are trainable. Then you'd have a fox 'guarding' the henhouse against other foxes every time he marks his turf. I'm thinking an electric wire and judicious use of a paintball gun or some other annoying but non-damaging projectile weapon could be used to 'train' your fox without taming him. A steady food supply would probably help too.

    I'm glad you're considering ways to not kill him, even if you don't get elaborate about it. If you kill him you'll just have some other fox come take his place.
     
  6. Jennifer L.

    Jennifer L. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I did Google some things, but most seems to be for the UK and I don't believe they have rabies there. Believe me, I don't want to have to touch this fox for any reason. If it was a case of just getting bitten, that would be one thing, but rabies is something else. So I think the stuff that has to be rubbed on is out. Thanks for the suggestion anyway, Moopups.

    Yes, Suburbanite, I could take him to a vet, but legally I'm not supposed to be messing with him and if the DEC got him, they'd be doing him in. I'm not sure that the vet wouldn't turn me in on it. I'm only doing this because I've been watching him for a few weeks and his behaviour is pretty normal. Runs when he sees cars and tractors, etc. He's been out and about in the daytime getting dead fish off of the shore because he's not been eating good. Hunting has probably becoming harder for him and the dead fish have been easy to get (there's been a recent fish kill in Lake Ontario, lots of dead fish on the shore.) As for territory, he was born out here in my hay barn, although he's been living about half a mile away. I normally have a pair out here and they keep my chickens and setting turkey hens thinned down. I like foxes and don't worry too much about the birds. I don't want to tame him down, though. Rabies again. Don't want a fox that acts like a pet. If he survives, I'll rehome him at a vacant barn I own about a mile away, which he probably knows all about.

    Ladycat, does that have to be fresh garlic or could it be dehydrated? So far he's gotten dead rabbit kits (darn the heat wave!) two pheasant chicks that were close to two months old and were smothered by chickens and I'm at the point I'll have to be doing in a cockerel for him, or else dog food, for tomorrow. I could dose either one with dehydrated garlic.

    Valent, I'll go for the pour on if I get to tractor supply this week. I've only ever used the injectible so don't have any on hand. I did read that it has to be retreated in three weeks in order to get the newly hatched ones.

    Thanks, everyone!

    Jennifer
     
  7. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Feed the animal some of the invermectin. Do a search and you can find the appropiate amount. I would not want to touch the animal regardless.
     
  8. Farmer Willy

    Farmer Willy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My first thought was he had passed away a few years back, gone to see Elizabeth, so why care if he has mange now or not. I guess I'm dated.
     
  9. Vere My Sone

    Vere My Sone Well-Known Member

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    A friend of mine adopted 2 dogs with mange, that were thrown out at her house.

    This is the kind of mange that comes from the mother and is very hard to treat.

    The vet gave her injectable ivermec for swine
    it's the same as the kind TSC sells

    her directions were for 1 cc for the larger dog, and 3/4 cc for the smaller dog
    by mouth, not injected

    so, going by how large they were, looked to be part pit, but they were still pretty skinny, I'd say reduce the dosage down for a fox

    but, now, here is the part you might seriously think about

    the vet said to continue to give it for 30 days after the dog tests clean
    the larger of the 2 is now at the clean stage, but it took a month of ivermec to get there
     
  10. Jennifer L.

    Jennifer L. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Wind, I've never heard of this autoimmune problem. I'll have to check into it. This has all of the appearance of mange, though.

    Looks like even if I get somewhere with this fox it will be long term. As if I don't have enough to do I have to come up with something else! Oh, well.

    Thanks, everyone!

    Jennifer
     
  11. Iddee

    Iddee Well-Known Member

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    When I was growing up, there were no epa rules, or ivermec. Dogs were treated for mange by dipping them completely under in used motor oil.
    New motor oil was said to burn, but used oil would not. They were dipped completely, including the head, then turned loose in the yard. The fox could be dipped, cage and all, but would need to be released where he could rub it out of his eyes, nose, and ears.
     
  12. Michael W. Smith

    Michael W. Smith Well-Known Member

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    I'm curious how you got it in a cage. Is it not afraid of you? I have to commend you for trying to help it. As for not wanting to touch it, I agree. However, is the cage big enough that you could have a rag on the end of something dipped in something to rub on the fox to help speed recovery?

    I must say though, that with you taking care of it (it sounds like for a month or more), you should be able to get it to bulk up by feeding dog food with broth or like a gravy train type food. If it hasn't been able to eat properly, I'm sure the stress of that helped bring on the mange.

    Let us know how things go!
     
  13. Jennifer L.

    Jennifer L. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Gosh, Iddee! The poor dogs! LOL! I can imagine oil all over everything from where the dogs rubbed against it for the next few weeks! I'll remember your idea but not sure it's something I'd want to do to an animal (translation: I'd hate trying to clean up after doing it! :) )

    Michael, the dogs found the fox first and it was holed up behind a pile of 8' sections of empty rabbit cages on the ground next to the barn. Piled, they were 5' high and a barrier the fox couldn't get through. I opened another cage at the end of the sections and jammed it up against the piled cages and the wall of the barn, then forced him into the open door, so it was actually quite easy. Any other place and I wouldn't have been able to capture it at all. As for fear, it's hard to say with a fox. I had another one with very bad mange last winter in the poultry barn and I did pop that one off. The two act very much the same. When cornered and they realize they can't get away they just seem to give up and accept the situation. It's probably because they don't have that much fight left in them, but being foxes they are clever about things and I'm sure that if it saw the opportunity to get out, it would. When I bring food (a smothered young turkey this morning) it will flatten down some and look daggers at me, but movements are very slow and careful. It appears to freeze in a position, even an awkward position, and not want to move while I'm there. Yesterday when it was hotter than you-know-where and I was watering it, I turned the house on it to soak the fur down. Fox did NOT like that, but it must have been cooler for the rest of the afternoon, anyway.

    Hadn't thought of rubbing it with rag from a distance. I'll keep that in mind. It gets about a week to be showing some improvement, or I'll probably put it down, anyway. I'm hoping the Ivomec it's already had will be having some effect that will show soon.

    Jennifer
     
  14. RACCOON

    RACCOON Well-Known Member

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    I had a dog that had mange,took him to 5 vets ,they couldnt cure it.
    A old sheep herder told me to mix ,used car oil,turpintine,fuel oil,and grease together
    and apply on the bald spots daily.
    It worked
     
  15. Farmer Willy

    Farmer Willy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Just curious. Have you ever drank Mt. Dew, and if so did it make you sick?
     
  16. insanity

    insanity Well-Known Member

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    Ive read (unconfirmed) reports that Front Line has cured mild cases of the dermal-what ever type mange.Its the one that is past from mother to pups.
    Its worth a try i guess.If nothing else put it after its been treated with something else,before releasing it.