Recipe-All Flesh is Grass

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by minnikin1, May 18, 2005.

  1. minnikin1

    minnikin1 Shepherd

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    This book had a recipe for making feed out of regular lawn clippings in a plastic trash bag.

    Does anyone have the recipe they could share? Have you tried it?
     
  2. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    The recipe? No. HEard of it? Yes.

    I was told that some farmers would take a trench with a heavy plastic liner, and fill it with chopped corn or hay. They would then tamp it down with the tractor if they thought it was needed, and put a heaavy plastic liner on top. The idea is to keep the air out so it does not mold.

    Basically, the forage would pickle. Mind, I don't think it is salted, but I DO know that silage has a pronounced vinegar odor.

    When it is time to feed it, the stuff is opened and the top couple of inches of moldy stuff is taken off. The cattle then help themselves as they please.
     

  3. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Just silage, or haylage in this case.

    You simpley put the grass up in an _airtight_ container. If there is any oxygen in it or allowed in, the moisture & O2 produce mold. Without O2, the good bacteria go to work & produce vinigar, pickling the grass clippings.

    You need to pack it tight, so no air is in it. You need to seal it tight. And no air space on the top. Just no oxygen at all.....

    The clippings can be slightly wilted. Should be about 50-60% noisture, _just_ cut will be 75% or so, and if you let it dry too much them not enough water to keep the bacteria fermenting.

    Corn is easier to do with more sugars, but grass & alfalfa has also been ensiled for a long, long time by farmers.

    Do not feed anything that turns into mold, obviously. The pickled stuff will have a pleasant odor, and look green (or a bit brown) and fresh.

    I'm familiar with the old vertical silos, the bunker (trench in the ground) silos, and the new baggers. Not familiar with such small-scale jobs as lawn clippings.

    You need to seal it right away, can't fill a barrel 1/2 full, wait to get more in a few days... When feeding out a big silo, you need to remove 3-6 inches per day from the surface, to keep ahead of spoilage. Once O2 hits it, it starts to slowly spoil. The key on the farm-sized silos is to pack the stuff tight, keep air out of it. How that relates to a can sized operation... ??? ...

    --->Paul
     
  4. minnikin1

    minnikin1 Shepherd

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    Thanks for the good info -

    the only thing that was different about the one published in this book is that it had molasses, or some kind of sugar added, I think.

    I thought that would be a safeguard against some bad bacteria...
     
  5. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Nope, both the good & bad bacteria eat the same sugar. Oxygen (lack of) is the very important part.

    The trouble with grass hay is that there is not much sugar available, so adding some in that way probably will help provide more vinigar when all is said & done.

    --->Paul