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Rocky Mountain Deserts
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Discussion Starter #1
A few years ago, my husband was permanently disabled in his job leaving us without adequate income for several months (14 months) while his government employer "figured things out". It is a long story, but that is the short of it. During this time, we went without a lot of things, and wished we had more on hand and in our savings accounts to get through this very rough time in our lives. This lead us to wanting to be more prepared and eventually we discovered that we were quickly becoming "preppers". I accepted this about the time I joined HST (Dec 2012), and have been working toward being more self reliant and prepared. Almost two years later, I am comfortable that we can handle a situation resulting in absolute seclusion of our family for 3-6 months, and we can survive a loss of one income for approximately 2 years. I'm pretty comfortable with that, but I am not satisfied with it. If the zombies come (what we call a shtf situation) I'd like to be ready to survive for way more than 3-6 months.

In the research I have been able to do, at this point, I think it is very important to identify the most likely risks to my area. Trouble is, I can't find any information from my local, county, or state government about their risk assessments. Where does one find that info? How do you decide what is most likely, and what risks are not limited to one geographical area?
 

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"Prudent Places" by Stan and Hollye Deyo is an excellent resource. It not only lists the 'normal' things you'd look for (mosques, nuclear facilities, missle silos), but the not-thought-of ones like train tracks (for hauling nuclear waste), mines, chemical plants, etc. Very well-written.
 

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The people in control have made great strides in making sure that every place in America is at risk for SOMETHING. Notice how in the sparse population areas that aren't prone to natural disaster they decided to put their nuclear power plants and radioactive waste sites.
 

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Rocky Mountain Deserts
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Discussion Starter #4
LMAO, this further illustrates why I think we need to be aware of the risks specific to our areas. You consider things like mosques and missile silos to be fairly normal, where I was thinking severe weather, earthquakes, flooding, rioting, and fires would be more on the normal list. I live in a rural area with two nearby nuclear reactors - so that would be on my not so normal/ high priority list. Our low population of non-christian faiths makes me worry very little about terrorists in the common sense - crazy ass ******** with to much beer and a death wish would be higher on my list of concerns.

Ernie ... have you been tracking me with some secret GPS tech? j/k I live in just such a place!
 

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I guess Im lost but are you talking about moving relocation just incase something bad happens? I bought this place 30 or more years ago because it was on a hill in case baltimore flooded.
 

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Rocky Mountain Deserts
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Discussion Starter #6
No, not relocating. I have been here for 30 years. Would be a shame to have to learn all new geography unless it was critical to survival post event. I am just wondering where to find info about what events are most likely to take place in the area where I am located.
 

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Your talk about reactors makes me think we are near-ish neighbors--the only place with reactors in Idaho being the INEL as far as I know. And, if you're too close, improperly stored nuke waste. So, bearing in mind that region, you've got Yellowstone as exhibit A of bad things, wildfires as exhibit B. Things that are nasty move by freeway and rail around here. Fertilizer plants and other chemical plants. Disruption to food supplies by potato blight or similar. Drought or excessive rainfall--the county's been scraping my neighbors' driveways off the road this year. A driveway washout's not a big deal, but we had five inches of rain in August (you coastal folks shush--that's half our annual average), how's your basement/well house/whatever going to cope with that, if it didn't get you this year? Will your supplies be okay? On the bright side, the dominant regional religion mandates food storage, so we're likely to see much less disruption by starving people than other regions. Growing up here, I know even my friends whose families were hopelessly behind in their storage could've fed themselves on something (jello and canned chicken, at least) for a month or so.
 

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Personally, I think even if you are in a bad area, if you are from there or have been there a long while you are probably better off staying. Most places do not just invite outsiders in. I know people who have been around here for 10 or 15 years and if you ask someone else, they will still tell you they are from "OFF". Community relationships can become very important in some situations. I think in some cases your community relationship will out weight some regional risks.
 

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Rocky Mountain Deserts
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Discussion Starter #9
Sunbee, you have really described most of what I have thought of based on historical events and knowing the general area. Maybe you can help me establish some kind of most likely to least likely threat assessment?

My list so far
Severe weather (winter) - closed/impassible roads, freezing temperatures, no plows for days
Loss of electricity/gas - caused by everything from weather to drunk driver, to scheduled maintnence
Flooding - problematic in spring and fall
Wildfire - Idaho has on average 1433 wildfires per year
Earthquake - Idaho has on average 33 earthquakes per year
Viral Outbreak - Ebola anyone? and let's face it, our health structure here especially is not sound.
Nuclear disaster - it could happen
Crazy Drunk ******* - Those who fail to prepare are prepared to fail
major crop failure
economic collapse
 

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I would believe, after living in one place for 30 years, that you can look at what has happened in the past around you in your area and identify/prioritize the risks or as you call it, threat assessments.
 

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Rocky Mountain Deserts
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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
You are probably right wolfmom - I could make these assessments on my own. Based on my own experience and knowledge, not taking into account what others may have remembered that I had forgotten or am to young to remember. I think that others have valid view points that should be considered, and others have a great knowledge about things I do not understand or do not consider. I often have days when I "just didn't think of that".
 

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Regarding the weather, remember that while most areas are fairly good at dealing with their normal weather challenges, it is the unusual ones that really cause problems. An extreme heat wave in Minnesota or a severe cold snap in Alabama, for example. Or perhaps tons of rain in a desert environment or a prolonged drought in a normally verdant area. Few people are ready for that kind of situation and have major difficulties knowing how to deal with it. However, I do feel that your general preparedness will go a very long way toward helping in any weather situation.

I learned of our most likely potential problems (ice storm followed by severe cold snap or chemical spill from area industry) through our local American Red Cross director. He was very willing to discuss with me our most likely problems and to brainstorm regarding how families out on my rural end of the county could prepare ourselves. You might want to check in with your ARC and see if they are willing to share information and plans with you also.

However, after doing this all these years, it seems to me that most of my preps are not "threat specific". For example, my needed response to a loss of power would be the same regardless of whether it was cause by an ice storm, an earthquake, or a pandemic which caused the local production facility to be shut down. The main variable would be the duration of time without power.

If the local community shuts down, it doesn't really matter as much whether the cause is severe weather and loss of power, pandemic or earthquake. The bottom line would be that the bank, gas station and pharmacy would be closed.

I think it is helpful to do research and make a few plans that are specific to various threats, but I think it is more prudent to spend time on studying your major living requirements and determine how you could meet them in a non-electric, non-available or non-safe world. Plan back ups for your back ups. Then, whenever you become aware of a new possible threat, you can hold that up against your basic plan and determine what if any minor modifications would be needed.

Of course, there are some possible events that in my mind, are inescapable. Not much I can do if a comet takes out my region, or if a volcano or nuke creates an artificial winter. If I survive the actual event, I could live for a few years on my stored supplies, but not forever. This is not why I have pursued a strong spiritual life, but my spiritual beliefs are a significant comfort when I ponder these types of situations. I am doing my very best to survive and thrive, but if I don't, I have no fear of where I'll be going. :)
 
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I started storing things for Y2K people thought I was nuts then and I guess still do. But I was not able to get extra medications from the doctor then or now, how do you all deal with that or dont you have a problem with your doctor?
 

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Are you planning on staying put, or living in an underground cell? If you don’t have to bury yourself for more than 3 − 6 months, think about what you have outdoors. You can plant a bigger garden, you can trade with neighbors. You might want a generator to keep your freezers going if you loose electricity. You might want a turbine to keep the freezers going if you loose electricity for a long time, but your winter is cold enough to use the outdoors as a freezer (we have).
 

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Forcast, I am not sure there is a good answer for medications, especially prescription medications. I know there are some illnesses that people have where they must have medications to live. I think realistically there will be a few scenarios. 1 a person stores as many of the needed medications as needed and hopes it is enough. At the same time a person should probably research what the alternatives are, as in replacements or natural remedies which may help. probably for someone serious about it not out of the realm of possibilities to use different doctors in order to get more than needed. Addicts have been using this trick for a long time to get high, not sure why a person could not do it for lifesaving purposes, but there is a risk, as in most cases it would be illegal.

I think a very real scenario with many people will be they may simply run out and die! But, I think just as many may find that all of those pills the doctors have been subscribing they can live just fine without! I also believe there are many natural alternative medicines will will work just as well as many of our modern medicines, unfortunately, much of this knowledge has been lost, carried to the grave by past generations who never had the opportunity or inclination to pass the knowledge on.
 

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Of course you know about food storage . . . . .But have you looked at what ever is needed for your disabled hubby to keep him comfortable for a very long time . . with out ever leaving your home........
I have gone to an concoction of errbs for pain for my banged up leg . . . .instead of the common --asprin-- . . . . . .works great.
Problem is I have to special order some of the things..
 

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I started storing things for Y2K people thought I was nuts then and I guess still do. But I was not able to get extra medications from the doctor then or now, how do you all deal with that or dont you have a problem with your doctor?
My insurance will let me fill prescriptions a week early, every month I call while I still have a weeks worth left and after a while those weeks add up. I just have allergy/asthma Meds that I can do without when my allergy aggravating pollens aren't out so I can get ahead there too.
 
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My insurance will let me fill prescriptions a week early, every month I call while I still have a weeks worth left and after a while those weeks add up. I just have allergy/asthma Meds that I can do without when my allergy aggravating pollens aren't out so I can get ahead there too.
Same with me. In a year I get three months extra. So far I have "saved" up almost a years worth that I rotate.
 

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Rocky Mountain Deserts
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Discussion Starter #20
ovsfarm - great thoughts! For the most part, I feel much the same about just dealing with whatever is thrown at us and being flexible where we have chosen a bug in solution. However, My "prepper group" aka extended family in the area want to have a breaking point or rules for when to expect company or to meet up at our pre-selected extra remote location - you know, back up plans for back up plans idea. For example, my property is located on the river front - if we have flooding conditions, my parents want to know when to expect me and the family to be moving in with them up on the hill. In the event of severe drought, if they are without water for their livestock and crops, I guess mama is coming to dinner. In the event that the whole valley is overrun with flesh eating zombies, I suppose that we would load our assigned and personal supplies and head out to the meeting spot before we make our way to our (for now) imaginary strong hold on a private island in a land locked state. But the question still remains, at what point do we execute these plans? Do we really need to plan for this private island and purchase it?

That is a great question about keeping my husband comfortable. He has 4 vertebrae in his spine fused and has lost 30% of his range of motion on top of moderate PTSD. For right now, we have found highly effective replacements for all the OTC and prescription medications in our entire home, even with his disability. Dor now, those replacements come in the form of essential oils (that we have stock piled and worked hard to preserve and extend the shelf life on). As I am on this learning curve, I am constantly trying to color my black thumb green so we can grow the plants and herbs for the oils we just can't live without. Slowly and over time as the oils run out, and can not be replaced, my kids and I will become more successful at cultivating them. Luckily for us, the tansy that is in his pain killer blend grows wild here.

ET1 SS - how do you get on these lists?
 
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