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I garden in raised beds, have had this garden in the same spot for 10 years, no way to move it. I rotate my tomatos but have had to plant in the same spot often enough that I had the worst blight this year, cut way into my harvest. I usually add mushroom compost to each bed every year and put in new potting mix but I guess my luck has run out. How can I get rid of the blight in the soil and give my tomatos a new start?
 

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you can't. you can remove all of your soil, but that still might not work. you will probably have to start a new garden spot. at the first sign of blight get that plant out of the garden. try not to touch your tomatoes, you just spread the disease. use black plastic as mulch so as to keep the rain from splashing infected soil on your plants, don't stake them. too much handling.
 

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You could try solarizing the soil. Also.. if you put a hoophouse up over your tomato area, you can keep it closed up in the middle of the day for 3-4 hours, getting the temps up to 100F. This will slow blight immensely. Just make sure to open it back up !!
 

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"Blight" is a generic term that could indicate one or more of any number of diseases. Some diseases overwinter on plant debris, others are killed by freezing. Others will live on green "leftovers"--living tomato tissue. . Others are seed borne, and if you save seeds you will get the disease the next year. So, without knowing what disease it was, you can only undertake the most drastic of measures. Take out all the soil and dispose of it, then dismantle the bed if it is lumber, and burn it.... Or, abandon the site for five or more years....And don't use the old seed.

geo
 

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I will second the poster who said to mulch the bed. Blight lives in the soil, so if you can keep it from splashing up on the plants, you will reduce the occurrences. I personally don't like black plastic -- I use grass clippings and such -- but it is a personal choice.

And that's only one of the things that mulch is good for!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I did have a black weed barrier type of cover down over one of the beds and planted tomatoes in it, but still the leaves just started dying out and shrivling up, got about half of what I normally harvest. I can't move the garden, and I sure can't stop growing for 5 years, so I'll remove the mix, cover with black plastic to sterilize, and try starting the beds over, thank you for all the good answers.
 

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Everything I've ever read about solarizing the soil, claims that using clear plastic will get the soil hotter than black plastic will.
 

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Use Google or Bing or whatever, and look up nematodes. Treat the soil that has had tomatoes or peppers or eggplants or potatoes or nightshade relatives or anything else that seemed blighted (REAL HOT to a great depth will do, methyl bromide fumigation worked 100% but may no longer be legal as it was deadly to the poor little nematodes and the Greens thought that was a bad thing).

Do crop rotation after that. None of the plants listed above for two years after a crop of any of them. Yes, I know it's inconvenient, but so is losing a crop because the gardener couldn't be bothered to do the standard recommended crop rotation.

French marigolds (Tagetes spp.) are generally a good plant to repel nematodes. Don't work 100%, but they do help. RESEARCH IT WELL - most French marigolds work well, some breeds just feed them. Companion planting, and crop rotation.
 
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