re-fencing ???'s

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by marvella, Apr 3, 2006.

  1. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    i've got two questions...

    1. can i replace my existing 4 strands (on wooden and t-posts) with high tensile? i want a heavier gauge (ie. hopefully less breakage and maintenence) than the 15 and 17 in use now. i mean, can high tensile also be electric??

    2. i know there is a way to put wire around the goats neck and dangling in front so they get a harder shock, but cannot remember the details. anyone??

    it's spring. seems like they are worse about getting out in spring and fall.

    so, thanks! :D
     
  2. Rowdy

    Rowdy Well-Known Member

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    Maybe, It really depends on how stong your corners are built. I've not done alot with high tensile, but we once replaced some old woven wire with high tensile, but the corners were pretty stout. If your posts were set just for normal electric fence, then it will probably not be strong enough.
    Yes, high tensile can be electric.
    Personally, I do not like using T posts on electric fence. I do not care for the plastic insulators, but that being said, I am using T posts on my fence right now. :)

    Actually, if you are new to high tensile fencing, Tractor Supply has a free 20-30min VHS about it in their electric fencing row that you can take home and watch. It's isn't the end-all of high tensile fencing, but gives a decent overview. If your local TSC does not have it, let me know, I think I have one lying around here.
     

  3. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    thanks for the heads up. i'll look for the tape.

    yes, now that you mention it, the corners would need some bracing, in 4 or 5 places.

    i don't like those plastic insulators either. they break way too easy! i've used ceramic where i can, but it's pretty rough land. that's why i need the goats.:)

    have you ever tried the wire on the neck trick? someone told me about it, but now that i want to do it, i can't remember. as usual. :monkey:
     
  4. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    golly all y'all... anybody ever heard of that? maybe i should cross post in goats.
     
  5. MERRYMEDIC

    MERRYMEDIC LIVE YOUR LIFE...

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    Wake up GOAT PEOPLE and help this woman :bouncy:

    Plus I am curious too... :eek:
     
  6. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Never heard of the wire on the neck deal. Not so familiar with goats tho either.

    Getting a 12.5 gauge or even a 12g cable (2 wires like barbed wire, but no barbs on it) will make a _big_ diff for you. It doesn't have to be high-tensile wire, doesn't sound like you are going to go that high-tension route. A bigger wire, with a better charger perhaps (doesn't pay to buy anything less than a 50 mile fencer in my opinion, those fencers are rated at when they become inneffective, _not_ when they are really working for you!) and make sure your grounds are very good. The critters need to _respect_ the electric, not just be annoyed by it.

    Locally everybody uses barbed wire for the electric starnds, but that does not seem common in other parts of the world so I won't beat that horse any more. :)

    --->Paul
     
  7. pigeonracer2k

    pigeonracer2k Well-Known Member

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    I have just put up about 2000 ft. of fencing and decided to use high tensile wire strung between steel T posts.
    1 Its heavy
    2 If you kink it and put it under good tension it snapped
    3 When you come to wrap it you need muscles the size of Superman and 4 hands.
    I wished after that I had not bothered but had bought a thinner guage wire which would have been easier to work with.
    I guess it could also have been that maybe there is a knack to using it which I didnt know about.
     
  8. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    There are some techniques that are beneficial when installing the high tensile wire. Most of these methods are a monkey see monkey do approach. I learned the few I know from farm expos where the various vendors had manned displays. The biggest aid in putting up high tensile fence is having the proper tools. It is absolutely necessary to have a payout device (spinning ginny), the proper pliers, good tensioners, a crimp tool and sleeves, a decent test instrument and a good charger. The installer needs to learn how to make quality corners that can handle a lot of stress. It is not necessary to have the wire banjo string tight but it does look good. I am able to space the posts on large spacings and I use predrilled PVC/fiberglass line posts. This enables the fence to go up rather fast and makes the task a single person effort. Todate, I have single handedly used approximately 120,000 feet of the 12 1/2 gauge grade 3 galvanized wire. I have lots of paddocks that only have a single strand of wire but the perimeter fence is all 4 wire enclosure. My biggest gripe with the high tensile system is the cost to maintain the chargers that fail from lightning or mains surges. I buy rather high end chargers and I figure my cost of ownership is the purchase price divided by the warranty period. I look for units that have a 2 year guaranty.
     
  9. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    thank you all!!

    i do have a good charger, good for 50 miles. i also have one that is solar, only good for 25 miles. i've hesitated to change it over (even tho i'd like to) just because of the loss of power. so, as it stand i have a new solar charger in the shed, so maybe i'll use it one day i'm trying to fence anything but goats.

    okay then. thanks for al the answers. hopefully someone in goats will know about wiring up the goats too!
     
  10. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    Can't help about the wire around the necks, but aside from something else to touch the fence I don't see the benefit.
    Cances are if you need something like this you have a bad ground. The best most powerful fence charger will not work without proper grounding. They recommend 3 ground rods for your charger and in dry soil you might still have ground problems.
     
  11. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Are you possibly referring to a yoke for a device around the animal's neck? I have seen animals that tend to go thru the fence have a Y shaped wooden device around their neck to work as an obstruction should they decide to crawl between the wires. To make such a yoke all one needs to do is to cut a forked tree and then place a wire over the top two forks and pull the forks inward to form somewhat of a U at the top. Once the wood has cured it will retain the shape. This device is then placed around the goats neck and is secured at the top with a crossover rope or leather. the animal wears this as it goes about its activities. When the animal attempts to go thru the fence the yoke obstructs the passage and the animal is delayed to where the fence charger is able to deliver a couple of shocks which in turn change the animals direction. The yoke does work.
     
  12. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    ag- that is what i was looking for- thank you very much!!!

    bee- i can personally guarantee that the fence is plenty hot enough. hot enough to shock and still be numb a few hours later. fencing goats is all. apparently they are willing to put up with short term pain just go get to that last piece of honoeysuckle, just on the other side of the fence.

    the pasture is set up that the paddock area is fenced with field fence with a hot wire at top and bottom. they have never gotten out of this. the problem comes up when i let them out into the new rough place, that crosses a small creek a time or two, and is fenced with only 4 strands of electric.

    they don't even get out of that every day, just once in a while. they did manage to strip most of the bark off my pear trees recently. :grit: :grit: :grit:
     
  13. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ..............marvella , you will have to wrap each tree and bush trunk if you want to insulate them from your goats as they are equal opportunity eaters as you now know . fordy... :cowboy:
     
  14. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    ooooh, you know they always go straight for my favorite stuff. :eek: at the old place i was never able to get blueberries started because of them. got new ones planted here, and so far, so good. pear trees have put out a few blooms and setting leaves, so they may survive. too soon to tell. they were planted by the previous owner so they've been bearing fruit too! nice small sweet bosc pears.