Raw Milk.. The need?

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by JeffNY, Jul 16, 2005.

  1. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    Well, its amazing, the need for raw milk is growing and the fact people are asking for it, is also amazing. One lady who buys hay from us for her horses, has a daughter who works at a store. Well her daughter is asked quite a bit if they know of anyone who sells raw milk. Now whats interesting about this, that is only those going to the store, this is not others who do not go. So my goal of (pending I did get a permit) selling 30 gal. a day could be realised. I forget the persons nickname on here that sells 70 gallons a day, and has a line outside of his barn. See the thing with selling raw milk, and the milk system I am using. I can select which cow to sell the milk from. So what if one had a higher SCC count, while the others were nice and low. I would use them, milk would taste better anyways. Interesting stuff and best of all, it allows me to get away from the prices of organic (main reason for seeking cert, well ONLY reason), and even organic itself. But I gotta start milking first, starting shipping, then go after the permit.


    Jeff
     
  2. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Hi Jeff,
    It's not so much the "need" for raw milk as the demand as people wake up to the fact the homogenised(sp), pastuerised, sanitised, sterilised rubbish sold in cardboard or plastic containers and passed off as milk actually has no bearing on the real thing at all - and it doesn't. The modern child has never had to scrap with his siblings as to whose turn it is to have the "top 'o the milk" on his cornflakes or porridge simply because it doesn't exist anymore.

    I would love to be able to sell my milk but the fight to do so, and the associated compliance costs would break the bank. I wish you all the luck in the world in getting it off the ground and allowing people to taste the real thing.

    Personally, I am getting rather tired of other people deciding what is good for me.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     

  3. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    I know that some folks are in or are planning to be in a dairy business of some sort. We could probably sell as much raw milk as we might want to but it isn't really our cup of tea. The folks who have come to us for raw milk are nice enough folks, but I had rather sell them a house cow than sell the milk from the cow.

    When we sold Dorsey we offered her to our customers first but they all said the lives they lead are too busy to be tied to a cow. Now they are all complaining because he amount of milk they had been buying has been reduced and that sometime this fall the well will be dry for a while.

    I suppose my view is different than some folks. We got into milk cows for Herself, me, our children, and or Grand-Darlings; the whole "milk customer" thing started as an accommodation to one family and before long we were running a mini-mart.

    I didn't understand why the goodfolk at Mullerslanefarm out in Illinois charged so much for their milk (well above double my price) but maybe I do now. I always asked $2.50 a gallon and used it for feed money so there was no profit/income involved, but once Lucy dries off and our remaining customers move on we're done with the milk business. We don't need or want the money, the headaches, or the problems associated with a dairy business; even one as small scale as ours is or was.

    I don't think I would too much mind pasturing and tending, for a fee, someone else's cow if they had no land. I could allow them milk room space as part of the deal, but I had rather they milked their own cow.

    All that being said, Daughter #3 called this morning to say that my Grand-Darling Angus wouldn't eat his breakfast without some of Mamaw and Papaw's "cow milk" with it, so Herself had to take them a gallon to calm the mood in Daughter's home.

    "The modern child has never had to scrap with his siblings as to whose turn it is to have the "top 'o the milk" on his cornflakes or porridge simply because it doesn't exist anymore." Ronney this is the exact reason we want our milk cows.

    A quote from Angus as said to his Mother, "You're not supposed to let us run out of cow's milk"
     
  4. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    My main goal is to sell 5-6 gallons a day, higher would be nice. The 30 gallons would be nice, but 5-6 would be easier. The main thing im trying to do is make up the difference with the organic milk prices, so I can ship to the regular milk trucks. Gets rid of a lot of headaches, and restrictions.



    But dairying it is tricky. However as far as problems go, and sickness goes. It seems to vary greatly farm to farm. Some farms have low SCC, less problems, and are doing well. While others have high SCC, and are having a hard time making it. I was looking through some papers I found at one of our farms from a past tennant. They had SCC levels ranging from 270,000 to (this blew me away), 1.4 million. A month before the $%## hit the fan (not because of money, some nosy neighbor), they lost their license for a time it seems to ship (too high of a SCC). When I read that, it was apparent some farms don't do well because it is dirty. They had a lot of problems, hoof, etc. The lady who owned the cows had to go work somewhere else I beleive. Their milk check $ was going to feed, and expenses. That operation was not smooth at all. But, it was their own fault. They didn't take care of equipment, or their cows as well as they should have. After they left, two barns were unuseable.

    But there is a inner will for those who dairy, atleast from my own will, to succeed. Funny, when I was younger I did not want to milk. But as I get older I see my hay sold, I kept thinking. I want to see my product, produce something. I want a challenge, haying it is challengeing. However I am at the point where it's no longer a challenge. So dairying it is! I guess what it comes down to, is the fact I was putting effort into storing hay for little return. Milking is 10x easier than feeding, and putting up crops (a lot of x dairy people, and current ones love milking over everything). I don't know, I rather being busting my @%@ doing this, than sitting for hours behind a desk pushing paper.


    Jeff