Ram problems

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by Greg, Jul 5, 2005.

  1. Greg

    Greg Member

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    We have an pet American BlackBelly Ram. He is small : about 70 pounds.

    We also have two adult female llamas. Around 400 pounds. They have been together a month on one acre.

    Most of the time they get on OK but sometimes, the ram tries to butt or kick their legs. Then they spit at him + he backs off. This often seems to be when I go into the pasture or when they're fed. It looks like he's herding them away from me or their food.

    But sometimes he charges the llamas really fast. He bounds / bounces at them. It looks dangerous and they run. When this starts he gets put in a separate small corral for the night.

    Any suggestions, please on what to do? Why is he doing this? I am worried the llamas will get hurt. I don't want to keep him separate + also don't want more aminals.
     
  2. livestockmom

    livestockmom Well-Known Member

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    Rams will be rams and he can really hurt your llamas...and you.
    Can I ask you why you have an intact ram as a pet? Do you have ewes in another pasture and this is his pasture in his "off" season?
    In my opinion, you can't correct or modify his behavior by removing him overnight when he acts naughty and then return him to the llamas and expect him to behave differently. I wouldnt expose my llamas to this treatment to have a pet ram... I would fence in a pasture area for him if he is needed as a working ram and get him away from your llamas...that can't be very peaceful for those poor ladies.
     

  3. quailkeeper

    quailkeeper Well-Known Member

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    NEVER make a ram a pet. The first thing I would do is castrate him or band him if he's not too old. If he's too old sell him. He will eventually start doing that to you. Look for a ewe or a whether to make into a pet.
     
  4. MorrisonCorner

    MorrisonCorner Mansfield, VT for 200 yrs

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    I second what Quailkeeper says... rams are NOT pets. Not matter how docile they appear "most" of the time, a ram is unpredictable, and anyone who tells you otherwise is a fool. I love my boys, and they appear to be friendlier than my girls. They come when you call them, they stand to be petted, lovely boys. And they weigh in around 200 pounds. Which, if they decide they don't approve of what you're doing, or they decide you're between them and the object of their desire (be it food or female) turns into 200 pounds of moving bone and muscle. Occasionally airborne bone and muscle. With horns in more than one case. If your head is down and one of these animals smacks into it, it can kill you. If your knee is in the line of fire, you may never walk right again.

    Love my boys. Trust them? No. Always plan an exit route. Always be aware of where your rams are. Never turn your back on a ram.
     
  5. Greg

    Greg Member

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    Thanks for the advice. All very much welcomed. Livestockmom- In answer to your question - my ignorance about rams is why I have him as a pet.

    I will separate him + advertise him in the paper.
     
  6. livestockmom

    livestockmom Well-Known Member

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    Good for you Greg, rams are a no-no as pets, gets us all anxious when we read Ram and Pet in the same sentence is all. I know they can be sweet when they want to. My rams are in the different pastures working right now and I hate it, I have to think of every move I make. Can't wait til all the ewes are covered so I can put them back in their pasture and once again walk around peacefully amongst the ewes.
    Yes, a wether or ewe would make a wonderful pet... Bless you for tolerating a ram when most of us have a hard time tolerating them in our pastures when they are out there working...
     
  7. Greg

    Greg Member

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    Thanks for the advice.

    This ram wandered in one day. We advertised for his owner who contacted us but did not want to come + get him, so we got stuck with him. I didn't realize he would be a lot of trouble. I've always got to keep an eye on him.

    It sounds like keeping him by himself is not a good option.
     
  8. elgordo

    elgordo Well-Known Member

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    If you have an "ornery" ram and who doesn't from time to time - you've got to try the "ram blinder". It works REALLY well! My Katahdin ram got one and he had no problem with eating, drinking and breeding. You can get them from Mid-States Wool Growers or from Preimier Fencing.
     
  9. Siryet

    Siryet In Remembrance

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    Are you anywhere near Arkansas?​
     
  10. Greg

    Greg Member

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    No - I'm in the PRC (Peoples Republic of California)
     
  11. SmokedCow

    SmokedCow Well-Known Member

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    where is PCR????
    AJ