Raising Sheeps and Goats?

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by beginnerfarmer, Oct 5, 2005.

  1. beginnerfarmer

    beginnerfarmer Well-Known Member

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    I am wondering how many sheeps and goats u can have on 5 acres of pasture? and also what would make a good meat or dual breed of sheep. I am also wondering what do u think of boar goat as a meat or dual breed?
     
  2. jimahall

    jimahall jimahall

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    The Icelandic sheep is a great dual (or triple) purpose breed. Look at the Icelandic threadfs on this foruma nd the info at http://www.isbona.com/

    In Alabama I would overseed with annual rye grass ASAP. Wal-Mart has it for about $13 per 25#. Also your feed store. This will get about 2-4' tall and they can graze it till June. Then this spring you can discuss with your county extension office about overseeding a permanant pasture mix. Not sure about the quanity of head on acreage. But with great pasture you can have more. You may want to make two paddocks and allow a rest for the grass between grazing. We have 10 acres and have it seperated into 5 paddocks. All but two are overseeded. One is our "yard" and the other is about to be a pond. Anyway, hope I helped some.
     

  3. beginnerfarmer

    beginnerfarmer Well-Known Member

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    A friend told me I can have 8 sheeps and goats to 1 acres in Alabama.
     
  4. Goat Freak

    Goat Freak Slave To Many Animals

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    Hi, just wanted to say that Boer goats are breed as meat goats, so they would be a very good idea for the goats. By the way, I heard that goats need copper and sheep can't have a lot, so you might want to make some special precaustions if you are going to keep them in the same area, as far as being fenced in together.
     
  5. jimahall

    jimahall jimahall

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    It really depends on the pasture. If you have no pasture then you run less head. If you have 4' of grass then you run more. If you do not mind feeding hay then you can have almost an unlimited amount. If you have no stock yet, then you best develope your pasture. With a lush, thick pasture you can run more head. You may also want to install irrigation lines. On a small acreage waterhoses will work with sprinklers from Wal-Mart. water once a week and your grass will grow.

    Get a soil sample done at your county extension office. Apply whatever they suggest. Poultry litter makes great pasture fertiliser. Once you have a well nourished and watered pasture then you can better determine the amount of head to run. With us, we do not irrigate. So in the hot, dry summer we have less pasture than in spring and fall. On about 7 acres we overseeded this fall with annual rye grass. we have now started getting some rain. We should be overgrown with pasture. We currently are down to about a dozen head of sheep after selling some. Even with over 20 head this summer and a dry summer, we still have pasture that is overgrown.

    Start small with the best registered breeding stock you can find and build your flock/herd slowly. Try to purchase pregnant ewes/does. No males. Then you can keep all your young females and add a ram/buck in the fall and have your flock a bit larger. If you see that you have to many head for your pasture then just sale some off. If you can handle more then keep more lambs/kids the next season. It really is trial and error. Only you can tell exactly how many you will have space for on your pasture. This year I could have handled 50+ head. With the annual rye grass up and expecting fair winter rains, we could handle 100+ head this winter. If we get no rain then a dozen head may be to many.

    Hope you are not confused. Hang in there. By this time next year you will be helping others. 40 years ago I knew nothing. Some would say I still don't :). You will make some MISTAKES. But learn from them and don't repeat the same mistakes. And post any stupid questions you have on this forum. The only stupid question is one you havew not asked. We will all try to help.
     
  6. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    Like most have said, there are a lot of variables, also significant food requirements depending upon what breed, (woolies vs hair vs primitive) also the size of breed, (obviously a Suffolk will eat more than a Babydoll) as well as your own pasture/feeding plans. Yes you can feed an unlimited number if you bring them food, but as your crowding goes up so does disease. By dual purpose I assume you mean wool / meat and not milk / meat. Have you ever sheared a sheep? Do you handspin or have a market for wool? Because if you buy a wool breed and dont shear it, it has a significant risk of getting sick and or dieing, unless you live in the arctic of course, or maybe a very high altitude that is cold all the time. You might start with a hair breed or a primitive breed that roos (sheds) what they are saying about icelandics also goes for Soay, but Soay will roo, if you forget about shearing them.
     
  7. beginnerfarmer

    beginnerfarmer Well-Known Member

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    I have never shear any sheep. but I do agree with u GeorgeK in this hot weather in Alabama I need a meat/milk breed. but in Northern Alabama it dont get so hot.
     
  8. jimahall

    jimahall jimahall

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    If you would rather not shear then look for a hair breed.