Raising pigeons for profit

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by blufford, Sep 8, 2007.

  1. blufford

    blufford Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Did anyone read the article about raising pigeons for profit in the latest issue of Countryside Magazine. Any observations about the subject is appreciated.

    It may have been another magazine that this was in.
     
  2. GrannyG

    GrannyG Well-Known Member

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    I raised them at one time, then sold the entire batch of 72 birds. I prefer to raise ring neck doves. I don't advertise, everyone knows I have them, so they are easy to sell to friends and others, I let them choose the one they want, $5 a bird, and I always give kids just starting an extra bird or two. I love to hear them cooing.
     

  3. tnokie

    tnokie Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I raise two breeds of pigeons. Not for sure you could sat its for "profit".Lol But I really enjoy themJust love watching the babys develope. They do it so fast its always interesting to see the colors develope.They do sell good at the swaps and auctions around here. The big National Young Bird show is in Louisville Ky. the last of Oct. If close you really ought to go its amasing at all the breeds and you can get starts there also.
     
  4. bob clark

    bob clark A man's man

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    there is a guy in canada that has a piramid sceme going involving these birds. he is making the rounds of all the magazines buying ads in exchange for a story on raising them. the Amish community is one of his biggest targets right now. they give him the cred he feels he needs to get more folks onboard
     
  5. Cornhusker

    Cornhusker Unapologetically me Supporter

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    Just curious, but what do you use pigeons for?
    We never had a pigeon around here until a friend started to raise them.
    Now, several years later, all the farmers are about to organize a lynch mob. Everybody has pigeons intheir barns and shops and they hate them.
    If they were good for something, maybe I could turn a profit?
     
  6. deb

    deb Well-Known Member

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    The Pigeon King. We even got a mass mailed post card from him a while back. I'm assuming he had them sent to everyone in this zip code because we have a large Amish community.

    Yup, it is a pyramid scheme and like all pyramid schemes...woe to the folks who join late!

    deb
    in wi
     
  7. DaleK

    DaleK Well-Known Member

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    There IS a decent market for pigeon meat, but this guy's definitely overselling it. There'll be a whole lot of people losing money on pigeons.

    We always used to have trouble with Italians coming out from Toronto and hunting pigeons around the barns. They used to like coming out Sunday morning when most of the farmers around were at church and there was no one here to see them. Shoot 25-30 pigeons, shoot the barn roof full of holes in the process, leave a bottle of homemade wine on the step as if that made up for a leaky roof, and go home to make pigeon pie.
     
  8. Beef11

    Beef11 Also known as ------

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    I'm not from Canada and i stay away from pyramid schemes but i turn decent money selling pigeons. I wish i had more. I always need more birds. I don't raise them i just catch them out of barns and sell them.
     
  9. rabbitgal

    rabbitgal Ex-homesteader

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    How about releasing white homing pigeons at weddings and fancy receptions?
     
  10. blufford

    blufford Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Maybe it was an ad and not a story. They made money selling them to people who used them for homing pigeons, racing and endurance contest.
     
  11. Kim_NC

    Kim_NC Always Thinking

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    The real money is in raising homing pigeons, enter them in racing contests, then selling winning birds for breeding stock. A winning bird can bring a price range from $2,000-$5,000 as a breeder - or much higher if a consistent winner. Young birds (under 30 days) also bring a tidy price if they're offspring of a consistent winner.

    A friend of ours (also a business partner on another venture) has a homing pigeon "hobby". Last year his hobby brought in well over $20G - enough money to make DH and I seriously think about getting into homing pigeons. We'll be considering it over fall/winter while learning more about the management and racing circuit.

    Kim
     
  12. deb

    deb Well-Known Member

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    The Pigeon King sells breeding pairs at $500 and buys back the offspring at $25. He requires you to breed from his own stock..at $500 a pair...so you can't breed your first pair, keep some eggs, raise your own replacements. These aren't homing pigeons and there is no known market for these pigeons except for the Pigeon King. He has acknowledged that he doesn't have an outside market for the birds, except for the folks who want to raise them.

    Right now the folks who bought 1 pair of his pigeons early probably can make enough money to pay off their initial investment and perhaps make some money...as long as he keeps paying $25 per pigeon.

    The problem with pyramid schemes is that at some point the market becomes saturated. Near the saturation point he will raise the cost of his breeding pairs while dropping the amount he pays for pigeons. The folks who buy breeding pairs when the market is becoming saturated will invest more money, but they will be making less money per offspring so paying off that initial investment will take longer and longer.

    At market saturation, the Pigeon King will no longer be able to sell his expensive breeding pairs and he won't be interested in buying more birds from his producers. The folks who "invested" in $500 breeding pairs will find those birds have little or no value and those breeding pairs will no longer produce offspring worth $25 dollars each.

    These folks have invested in a commodity (pigeons) that have had their market price influenced by their source & buyer. The only one who really makes money in the pyramid scheme is the person who creates & runs the schemes. Think about it! The Pigeon King sells his breeding pairs at $500, but buys them back at $25 each. He gets $450 in profit per breeding pair sold!

    No wonder he is looking for more suckers, err buyers.

    deb
    in wi
     
  13. CoonXpress

    CoonXpress Well-Known Member

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    They taste just like dove, except bigger.

    They're decent targets. Fairly straight and level flight while being shot at. I'd suggest using around #6 shot. Their feathers is just about dense enough to stop #7½ shot.

    Plus if a breeder is raising them, you can start collecting pigeon leg bands.

    CH, have you ever seen those hay wagon sized sparrow traps, they're great for pigeons also.

    Will
     
  14. Davymax

    Davymax Active Member

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    I am looking for some Giant Homers. (yes, that is a breed) We had them on my parents farm for years until Dad got tired of providing squab for rich folks that never paid that much to begin with. (he undercharged and never raised the price when the cost of feed went up)

    But as for me, if I could find those great tasting birds once again, they would be providing me with a great meal and some excellent pigeon gravy.

    PM me anybody if you can help me out.
     
  15. Macybaby

    Macybaby I love South Dakota Supporter

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    I saw thouse giant Homers at the SD state fair last weekend. I'd like to raise them for fun and meat. I'd never seen them before, they are quite large.

    I really like mourning dove, but they seem to have all headed south a few days before the season started.

    I love raising birds, but have agreed I'm only allowed cats in the house. Everything else has to survive outdoors. I plan on picking up an old round corncrib to use as an aviary. Some day . . .

    Cathy
     
  16. blue gecko

    blue gecko Well-Known Member

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  17. Sarah K.

    Sarah K. Well-Known Member

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    I am told there's good money in raising doves (in other words, white homing pigeons) for weddings or other events. Sounds like a good way to cover expenses for someone with show or racing pigeons or maybe bring in a little extra cash- not sure if there'd be enough of a market for it to be a major supplement to your income.
     
  18. palani

    palani Well-Known Member

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    St Paul uses them for root cause analysis on bridge collapses.

    Coincidentally, I have a friend whose son is in St Paul and raises racing homing pigeons.
     
  19. Ford8N

    Ford8N Well-Known Member

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    Pidgeons are rats with wings. I don't know why anyone would want them. They are filthy and carry disease. I had them in my barn when I bought my place and did everything I could to scare them away. That didn't work so I had to resort to a pellet gun and a big stick.

    Go to any big city and you can find plenty for free. No need to raise them.
     
  20. beowoulf90

    beowoulf90 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You are partially correct, but the difference between those you raise and those in the cities and barns is the ones you raise won't poison you.. The ones that live in the cities and barns eat a lot of paint chips from older homes. The paint on older homes may contain a lot of lead. So it you catch them and eat them you may be poisoning yourself.
    Now in defense of pigeons, we used to raise them when I was a kid. We had all kinds of fancy pigeons (Puffers, tumblers etc.) When we decided to get out of raising them we sold off all the fancy ones and ate the barn pideons(rock doves).
    Now if the animal rights orgs would stop hassling honest people we would have helped get rid of a lot of those in the big cities.. But we are no longer allowed to have pidgeon shoots to raise money for charity anymore...


    I haven't considered raising them again, but it might be a good idea..