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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have an area that is spring fed with a good flow and we want to have it dug out to create a pond so we can raise our own fish-type foods. The potential for a good-sized pond is there with a dam that would permit a waterfall that would then run on down the creek bed to the boundary line where it could be dammed up (with an overflow) to create some depth in the creek for maybe crawdads. (The boundary line would permit an overflow onto the neighbor's property following the "dry" creek bed already there and continuing on down to the back of that neighbor's acreage to an ever-flowing creek.)

I've already had this state's environmentalist come out and evaluate the situation and have been told it would NOT require any permits.

I'm wondering what "size" would be best for this pond for what "type" of fish. I am going to call the local agricultural department and hopefully speak with someone there about it prior to getting the pond dug.

I also need to know how best to treat such a pond as this is a "buyer beware" world; and I've read some type of product would be good to put on the floor of such a pond. (It has been awhile so don't recall all the information about this.)

Am posting here in hopes some of you who have actually created such a pond for "family" (not commercial) will be willing to share your experiences.
 

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You are thinking of bentonite clay pond sealer.


My grandpa had a pond dug on his place. Unfortunately he has been gone a number of years or I would ask what he did. I do know that you have to let a new pond set for a year or two before adding fish. He had the state bring out some fingerling fish, a mix of blue gill, crappie, sunfish and bass.
 

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We have an area that is spring fed with a good flow and we want to have it dug out to create a pond so we can raise our own fish-type foods. The potential for a good-sized pond is there with a dam that would permit a waterfall that would then run on down the creek bed to the boundary line where it could be dammed up (with an overflow) to create some depth in the creek for maybe crawdads. (The boundary line would permit an overflow onto the neighbor's property following the "dry" creek bed already there and continuing on down to the back of that neighbor's acreage to an ever-flowing creek.)

I've already had this state's environmentalist come out and evaluate the situation and have been told it would NOT require any permits.

I'm wondering what "size" would be best for this pond for what "type" of fish. I am going to call the local agricultural department and hopefully speak with someone there about it prior to getting the pond dug.

I also need to know how best to treat such a pond as this is a "buyer beware" world; and I've read some type of product would be good to put on the floor of such a pond. (It has been awhile so don't recall all the information about this.)

Am posting here in hopes some of you who have actually created such a pond for "family" (not commercial) will be willing to share your experiences.
There could be problems with using water from stream tor pond. I hve a pond 300ft circle and 10ft deep. Have a 300ft well that i pump water into it and also an outflow that feeds other smaller ponds. I have some nice Catfish , Bass, Trout, and small fish. Sunfish etc. First you need to drill down to see the soil for the bottom of the pond. It not clay you may have to have clay or something hauled in to put on the bottom of the pond to hold water.
 

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If you have clay soils and a water source, ponds are relatively simple to construct. Size should be 1/2 acre surface at minimum, a full acre or more would be better, and I'd want at least 10' depth. I've got five ponds on our farms and can pretty much catch a fish dinner anytime we want one. Fish that seem to do best are; hybrid bluegill, largemouth bass and catfish.

If you have otters in the area, they can be a real problem and clean out all of your fish in short order. Nearly every year there will also likely be some weed or algae control work needed, which requires expensive chemicals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for responding. To add some information:
Our soil has a lot of clay under the top soil.
The pond would be spring-fed not creek fed.
No otters here. :)
The neighbor is an elderly lady who never goes in that area of her 4 acres; and the bed where the water would be flowing has been a drainage ditch for years already. (Both her property and ours have a 5% slope all the way down from state road to the back property line which ends in a spring-fed and ever-flowing creek that could actually be dammed up to raise the water level....if we owned both sides of it. There are areas in that creek where the water could be 3-4' deep.)

Also I believe there are some fish that actually clean up the algae in ponds. :)
 

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Also I believe there are some fish that actually clean up the algae in ponds. :)
Tryploid (spelling?) Grass carp help somewhat with certain species of growth, but they don't get everything. Also, big grass carp are major oxygen users in a pond and I've seen cases during dry spells where the lack of oxygen and silt stirred up due to them has caused other species such as bass to die off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks Fishindude. I will keep that in my notes.
 

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Informative article about grass carp. They are not legal in all states and a permit is required to stock them where they are legal, according to the article.

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks Forcast. I will call the agricultural department and ask how to contact a local fish hatchery. I'm also remembering seeing signs of fish being sold for stocking ponds at our local Southern States; and will inquire there as well.
 
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Tryploid (spelling?) Grass carp help somewhat with certain species of growth, but they don't get everything. Also, big grass carp are major oxygen users in a pond and I've seen cases during dry spells where the lack of oxygen and silt stirred up due to them has caused other species such as bass to die off.
Grass carp and a couple other fish will clean out all the grass etc. Problem is no othre fish can live with them as all the food source is eaten by the Carp, etc.
 

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Our Son had a 5 acre pond. We stocked it with Catfish and Hybrid Bluegill, kept us in plenty fish.

Where we live now too close to rivers and Lakes to justify messing with a pond.

big rockpile
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Big rockpile how did your son keep the algae down in that 5-acre pond?
 

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We have about a 1/4 acre pond. It was totally ignored for about 10 years after my in-laws moved to assisted living and passed. We started going there on odd weekends before finally making it our primary residence. I had to pull a lot of dead trees out. But ... it had a bunch of Blue Gill and some bass. Also 3-4 carp. There were a couple snappers that the neighbor's grandson shot. There is an overflow pipe in the middle and one corner is designed for heavy overflow. There is a lot of drainage into the pond. When there is drought the water drops to the level of the overflow pipe but no further, so I'm assuming there is a little spring action going on there. Always plenty of fish I toss bread to from time to time.
 

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I had a great pond supplied with hybrid bluegills some grew to 4 lbs.
I loved it until I decided to add some bass. They destroyed all the blue gill population.
Bass wont eat fish food from the feed store so the eventually just ate each other,
 

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I had a great pond supplied with hybrid bluegills some grew to 4 lbs.
I loved it until I decided to add some bass. They destroyed all the blue gill population.
Bass wont eat fish food from the feed store so the eventually just ate each other,
When I had on pond built 20 years ago I stocked it with 250 hybrid bluegill, 75 redear and 75 channel cats.
The next summer, my dad caught (6) largemouth about a foot long and put them in the lake. That is all the bass we've ever stocked and have all we've ever wanted. Several times, I've even cleaned out a whole bunch of the small bass (fillet and ate them) to reduce their numbers. The channel cat fingerlings must have died or gotten eaten by the bass and bluegill, as we've never caught or seen one.

Doesn't take many bass to stock a pond, and they are prolific breeders.
 

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