Raising exotics???

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by ninny, May 26, 2006.

  1. ninny

    ninny Well-Known Member

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    Anyone know anything about raising exotics? I didn't see anything on the livestock forum, thought I would post here. Interested in Red deer, Fallow deer and Aoudad sheep. Any help appreciated.
     
  2. Clifford

    Clifford Love it, or leave it...

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    Raising Exotics? Why would you want to do that? I think those kind of dancers start out in trailer parks.........
     

  3. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have read up some on them, You can get some Free info. fromThe USDA and then Theres North Star Ranch in N Y state they sell books and breeding stock both. Plus you might want to look up A T T R A online they have booklets on this too.
     
  4. 65284

    65284 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I am familiar with the species you mentioned. I hate to sound a discouraging note but here is my opinion. There a lot of state and federal regulations, relating to most exotics. Complying with them is time consuming and expensive, and dealing with the various inspectors can be extremely frustrating. Start up costs for fencing and the necessary pens, chutes, and special equipment you must have is for handling them also very expensive. Also, CWD (chronic wasting disease) has made the rearing of almost any cervid species impractical. I have been around a lot of exotics and Aoudad are among the most dangerous hoof stock in existence, they can and will kill you. They come equipped with huge horns that they aren't the least bit reluctant to use. They are large, unbelievably strong, flighty, and if confined or crowded usually very aggressive. It doesn't take much to set them off, and the most common result is an escaped, dead, or injured animal, or person. They are among the most difficult of all animals to contain. They wreak havoc on ordinary fencing and I have seen them jump over 8' fences. Aoudad are best left to someone with proper facilities and a LOT of experience.
     
  5. Okie-Dokie

    Okie-Dokie Well-Known Member

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    The two most important things to know are when to get in and when to get out. To make the exotic animal thing work right you have to be right on the starting edge of the fad and have a feel for when interest in your particular animal type is begining to loose it's appeal and bail out quick.
     
  6. thedonkeyman

    thedonkeyman Well-Known Member

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    There are hundreds, and MORE of animals that were turned free to just be put on RESCUE Farms as NO ONE wanted them. Sure a few get adopted out. The owner of one of these RESCUE places was up set with us when I wanted to promote Donkey Showing. I wanted to get a list of all the adopted NEW Owners from her place in CO and she thought that promoting them would increase the number. Instead if people don't have a reason to have them they just wind up back at her RESCUE Farm. Well we have not received a list, just a nasty letter. Forming Donkey groups is a good idea to help people with their animals. Do you have a DONKEY ? ADA CEO