Raising Angoras, profitable?

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by yuvgotmel, Oct 10, 2006.

  1. yuvgotmel

    yuvgotmel Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    160
    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2005
    Hi,

    I am considering getting a couple angoras and possibly selling them. Are they very profitable? I live in Missouri so I don't know if that is a hotspot for them or not.

    Are there any breeders in missouri?

    Thanks
     
  2. CountryDreams

    CountryDreams Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    246
    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2005
    Location:
    Southern Missouri
    I've been raising them for about six months now. I live in Missouri and I do know that there aren't a whole lot of angora breeders in this state.
    I find that I'm having to sell them for a lot less than they are really worth just to sell them.
    I'm not going to be breeding mine for quite a while due to that fact.
    Good luck on it if you decide to get into it. I don't want to keep you from doing it, just research your market for them.
     

  3. Somerhill

    Somerhill Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,085
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2005
    Location:
    SE Ohio
    Here are two suggestions to boost your sales in MO. Attend rabbit shows and build up a group of people interested in showing, and work to build your own reputation as someone who breeds quality show rabbits and is reputable.
    Second, attend fiber shows and have a demo on how to groom, clip, etc., and have angora fiber and yarns to sell. It helps to have FAQ sheets made up on caring for angoras for newbies. They will sell from $25-40 at fiber festivals. Take empty boxes for people to take them home in, and know where they can find cages reasonably priced locally. Take baggies of pellets to send home too. (shoots down all the excuses why they can't buy the rabbit today - hehe)
    An up to the minute website with good pictures helps a lot.

    I have shipped rabbits to MO, so I know there are people there who are interested. :rolleyes:

    Best
    Lisa at Somerhill
    www.somerhillfarm.com
     
  4. holleegee

    holleegee Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,040
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2005
    I am also in MO (near Kansas City) There is a market for angoras in Missouri you just have to attend shows and get your name out there. You will meet other angora breeders at the rabbit shows and they are usually very willing to help out a newcomer. I am just starting out (1 year) with english angoras but I have people contacting me about rabbits pretty often. You should join the National Angora Rabbit Breeders Club (www.narbc.org) for more information.

    Good luck!! Angoras are lots of fun!
     
  5. rabbitgal

    rabbitgal Ex-homesteader

    Messages:
    1,508
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Location:
    Virginia
    LOL, that remains to be seen...I recently got a trio. We'll see how it goes!
     
  6. rabbitgal

    rabbitgal Ex-homesteader

    Messages:
    1,508
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Location:
    Virginia
    Hey, I've been researching Angoras lately. You might want to look into German Angoras. They purportedly produce 3-4 times the amount of wool as other breeds of the same size.
     
  7. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

    Messages:
    8,818
    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2006
    Location:
    S.E.Alabama
    like any breed you need to use ALL of them, if you want to sell live animals for a high price, they you have to get out there and do the Shows and get known, you need to market wool products and you need to butcher all extras and only keep the best,

    even if selling live animals is not working out i would NOT stop breeding them due to the fact that when you let does rest too long between litters you can run into trouble when you try to breed them again, some will stop breeding all to geather.
    i would keep breeding as usual and just put them in the freezer. you can use the pelts and the meat that way and your breeders dont quit on you so that when the market for live animals DOES perk back up you are set to supply the market right away rather than haveing to restart and possibly loose out to someone quicker on the draw than you were
     
  8. rabbitgal

    rabbitgal Ex-homesteader

    Messages:
    1,508
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Location:
    Virginia
    I'm sitting on a lot of Cal youngsters at the moment, but if need be, I can hang on to them until spring...the market REALLY picks up for breeding stock then. Plan ahead, and you can have livestock available when there's a demand and few others can fulfill it.

    You also have to advertise, advertise, advertise...yeah, run ads in all the usual places, but think outside the box too. Who might possibly be interested in your breed? For Angoras, one of the answers is hand spinners and fiber artists...this niche is being targeted, but whom else might want Angora wool?

    It also doesn't hurt to become an "expert" in your breed...then people feel like you know what you're doing, and having information available can in itself be a way to advertise your animals. For example, if people are coming to your website for information on how to groom longhaired rabbits, they may also decide to look at your sales list. Maybe they don't buy right now, but what if someone they know wants a rabbit? You'll probably get a referral.

    Oh, it's not that hard to be an eckspert...experts are just former drips under pressure. :D
     
  9. backtotheland

    backtotheland Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    76
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2005
    Location:
    New York
    I would agree with getting the German angora wholeheartedly. I have a satin, a French and a German/English cross and by far the German/English cross produces at least 2 to 3 ounces every time I groom her which is about every other day. I tried to spin it the other day and gave up. I only have a drop spindle and got one that weighs less than an ounce but it is still too heavy. People I have talked to and are experienced spinners say it is best to blend it. I haven't had much luck selling the fiber so I also agree that it is best to get out to do fiber shows which I'm planning on doing next year with both my angora and my wool. Good luck. They are sweet and so easy to care for too.

    Donna
     
  10. Ann Mary

    Ann Mary Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,309
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2004
    Location:
    Idaho
    Can the wool of a Jersey Wooley blended with an angora's wool be a good spinning combination? I'm thinking about getting some bunnies so that I can spin and was wondering if the 'blend' had to be with lamb's wool or with ??? Hope I'm not side-tracking the thread too much.
     
  11. trublu

    trublu Member

    Messages:
    19
    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2004
    Keep in mind that Germans require much more grooming then French. All their furnishings on their face and feet can be a problem. However, I used to keep those problem places trimmed short regularly. Since they do not molt like the French it is hard if they ever matt. I also found them not to be as hardy as French.
    Just my opinion.
     
  12. trublu

    trublu Member

    Messages:
    19
    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2004
    I have excellent quality French Angoras for sale. Young adults. Some are registered and or come from registered dams/sires.
    I have some going to Texas that I have sold that are going to be in the Nationals. I am excited!
    Come see for yourself and you can decide.
    I will provide follow up help and information free with your rabbit. If I dont know the answer. I know plenty of people that do. I also have a vet that has them too.
    Please do plenty of research and asking lots of questions. I dont want a bunny to end up being unwanted. I will help in every way possible.

    Please email me at my private email trublu@mcmsys.com

    Thank you,

    Toni Avery
    Little Flower Farms
    Central Mo.
     
  13. holleegee

    holleegee Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,040
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2005
    You can blend it with jersey wooley if thats what you have on hand. I started with angroas a little over a year ago. I bought a drop spindle and had a hard time spinning 100% angora so I blended it with wool, it made it easier to spin. I now have a spinning wheel and taught myself to spin 100% angora.

    Blending it has different purposes. You can blend it with wool to make the garment more durable. 100% angora is also 7X warmer than wool, a 100% angora sweater would keep you VERY warm! Angora is also more expensive to buy so some people blend it with other things because of the cost. I don't blend it and spin 100% angora because thats the only wool I have.

    I would thing jersey wooley wool would be similar to angora wool but I'm not sure.

    I hope that helped.
    Holly

    (if you decide to get into angoras you might want to join the National Angora Rabbit Breeders Club www.narbc.org they send out a newsletter that has tips on spinning angora wool!)
     
  14. yuvgotmel

    yuvgotmel Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    160
    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2005
    Wow! I check back after a couple days and look at all the replies!!! Thanks a bunch. I will look into German Angoras and it sounds like I need to learn how to spin. I have always wanted to learn. Never shown rabbits before. Sounds like fun. My cat just hurt himself (again) and the vet bills are rising so I think I will hold off on the rabbit thing until I can get myself organized. And study!!! I have never been to a rabbit show either so I am thinking I might visit a couple. I also want to hold off because I tend to be a spur of the moment person. I want to make sure that I am really serious and dedicated before I get in too deep.

    Thanks so much!!!
     
  15. rabbitgal

    rabbitgal Ex-homesteader

    Messages:
    1,508
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Location:
    Virginia

    I should have English Angora babies available in late December... :dance: