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In Remembrance
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Discussion Starter #1
The soil here is really sandy. My mobile home ties have really loosened up. Is there anything (reasonable $ wise) that I can do after it is moved to keep the tie downs tight? Also I want it higher off the ground. How high can I expect to put it without running into a lot more expense? I'm only having it moved a few hundred feet to a higher spot. I don't want to get flooded out again!
 

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Big Bird
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My brother in law used really long handled post hole diggers and went down 6 feet and concreted a chain in the ground and welded the other end to the framework under his trailer.

He did that maybe 5 times down the length of each side.
 

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Put the home up on concrete block pilings which should set on concrete footers. When the footers are being formed, use some rebar and leave a portion looped above the concrete line. After the home is moved, the tie downs can be connected to the rebar loops and pulled tight.

Ken in Glassboro, NJ :)
 

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my uncle set up a trailor about 12 years ago and for the tie downs he had a trench dug about 4 or 5 feet deep( below the frost line) and attached the aircraft cables that he used for the tie downs to telephone poles that lay at the bottom of the trench, the trench was dug just outside the line of the support posts for the trailor. there may be a rot issue with using poles, although they were quite full of creosote. so maybe concrete with the tie downs set into it. you could use poles to set the trailor on and make it as high as you want, with in reason. and put skirting around the bottom, or concrete block, that might give you more storage as well. i know how space can be at a premium in a trailor.

dean

BTW i wouldn't make it so high that it becomes an issue for your daughter getting in and out.
 

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If your home is held with screw in anchors I wouldn't think new longer strapping would be too costly.

In some areas--at least with the older units---the strapping had to go OVER the entire trailer rather than over the frame.

I like the idea suggested about trenching to install anchors. Don't see why the anchors couldn't be fastened to something other than a wooden pole. Also why not use a narrow trench and just fill it with concrete mix? Do one side, install the straps or cable where they belong, then do the other to the proper tension and fill the trench with concrete mix.
 

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In Remembrance
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Discussion Starter #6
You guys have some good ideas. I was wondering about the tie down straps, doesn't look like they are long enough to go up much higher. I would like the house at least 6 ft up so I can walk underneath. Storage space would be great too. What I don't want is for the house to come crashing down in a storm. Not cool!
 

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Don't know what you want but you will have to have quite the step to get up that high makes me think you are looking at building a porch . If so have you considered a wrap around porch and if you put a roof on the whole structure it provides double the insulation and shade for your mobile home. I did this when I lived in Texas and it cut my electric bill. I also screened in the porch. God Bless ya In your efforts
 

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To get the mobile-home floor up to a 6 ft. high level, you will probably need to build ramps......or hire heavy equipment (expensive!). It can be done with jacks.....time-consuming, dangerous, and not a good idea.

Perhaps since it is higher ground to which you are moving it, you might consider a basement or 1/2 basement. (You still would have the excavation costs.)

Better think about it a bit more...You could probably get a shipping container (for storage) a lot cheaper.

Bruce
 

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The tie downs are adjustable and it is pretty common to have to re-tighten after a while. I think the house can be lifted without all that much additional expense. Of course, the higher you stack cinder blocks the less stable them become.
 

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I've seen mobile homes jacked up as much as 15 feet in the air.

One fellow down here has a business where he routinely lifts them...he drills holes on each side of the trailer, sets poles and supports, runs I-beam underneath, and lifts with electric hoists.
 

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Be sure to unhook your plumbing and any gas lines, A/C tubing, or electrical lines before jacking up your trailer. Or at least make sure that your gas lines, A/C tubing and electrical lines are long enough so they don't get yanked out while you are jacking the MH up to it's new height.
 
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