Raised Bed Gardening

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by ceresone, Nov 15, 2005.

  1. ceresone

    ceresone Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Lets hear how you do your raised bed. framed? with what? how did you fill it? or, do you not used framed sides?

    Mine is cement block, 2 high, with a flat block on top. i plan, eventually, having 14 like the 3 i now have--13'long by 48" wide. and one bed, for strawberries 48"by 100' gradually filling with rotted hay, chopped leaves, chicken litter, horse manure, and sifted dirt. anyone else?
     
  2. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    I have used different stuff in the past, but found I prefer to just mound the materials up without sides.
     

  3. dlangland

    dlangland dlangland

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    My dad is a wonderful source of free, used wood. He gave some 2 x whatevers, and even makes me bent iron corners so all I have to do is drill the holes to fasten them together with bolts once I get the wood sawed. Then I just layer them up with whatever I have around. Some leaves, some dirt, some clippings. I have always managed to create some very good soil for free. Deb
     
  4. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    I've tried it all kinds of different ways. I have one bed that's one qyarter cement blocks, the other three wood, and it's worked fine. I'm working on one which is a very high cement block one --- I hope to have it finished by spring, but it's filled with chrysanthemums I've overwintering right now. Next spring, I'm planning on putting elderberries and something else ... I forgot ... into it.

    The mounding on the ground is the only one which hasn't worked for me. But that's because I have a German Shepherd girl who thinks I put that stuff on the ground for her to take a nap in :mad: and a lab mix who thinks I put it on the ground for him to divebomb into and flail about wildly. :grit: YMMV.

    I highly recommend the cardboard thing talked about in one of the other threads. Cardboard is the raised bed's friend.
     
  5. pickapeppa

    pickapeppa Well-Known Member

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    We used 16 foot oak planks that were bought cheap ($5 each) from our neighbor who wanted his horse fencing taken down. All the beds are 16 ft. long and vary in width from 3 ft to 2.5 ft. We dug down into the garden to make pathways and set the boards for the beds, and the dirt that was removed was put into the beds. Then we layed cardboard and mulched with cedar mulch down the pathways. Except for a thistle or dandelion coming up through here and there, it's lovely. We even added irrigation this year. What a time saver.
     
  6. hollym

    hollym Well-Known Member

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    Some of mine are landscape timbers with board ends that I nailed on with barn spikes. Some are make of rocks from my place. Some I built from 2X6 decking remnants from the Home Depot cull bin.

    I have to truck in dirt, just don't have any. I live on a limestone bluff. But I am saving materials to lasagna garden, so may not have to do all of that hauling. It's not that expensive to buy good rose soil here, but it's very tiring to shovel out the pickup and move it where I want it.

    hollym
     
  7. woodspirit

    woodspirit Well-Known Member

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    You should check into that fabric roller to unload your truck. What are they called? I've had one for years $79.99 and they work better than advertised. My twins used to unload the truck when they were 4 years old with 2000 pounds of gravel on the truck. I unload about 100 facecords of firewood with it every year. Real hi tech gadget. The fabric is held on with two pieces of duct tape. The customer service is outstanding from the 800 number too.taking it off the truck tailgate takes about ten seconds. maybe less.
     
  8. SquashNut

    SquashNut Well-Known Member

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    The soil in my pathes went up on the beds, no sides. permanant beds.
     
  9. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    El cheapo way. Take a length of old chain link fence and lay on the bed of the truck. You can put an old piece of carpet on the bed first to protect it. Get your load put on the fencing. Back the truck up to where you want to unload. Tie a hefty rope to each corner of the fencing (in the middle too if you like) and tie it to something like a stout tree and pull forward. the load will stay behind while you move the truck.
     
  10. woodspirit

    woodspirit Well-Known Member

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    I like to use the inside of the cinder blocks that make up some of the walls to grow things like flowers, marigolds but also mints that can spread out if not contained. Herbs too.