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“Homeowners use plastic to cover their crawl spaces to control moisture and create a barrier against vapor. Without such a barrier, condensation can infiltrate your home's walls and insulation, creating a substantial risk of mold and mildew. Plastic sheeting can also help turn a crawl space into a usable storage area.”
 

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We also use it under slab on grade for the same reason. It's a southern thing I guess.
 

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“Why is there a plastic ground cover under the house?”
You’re supposed to have a moisture barrier in your crawl space. Problem is it’s supposed to trap water beneath it, not on top. We use them here in the north too.
 

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“Why is there a plastic ground cover under the house?”
You’re supposed to have a moisture barrier in your crawl space. Problem is it’s supposed to trap water beneath it, not on top. We use them here in the north too.
I thought so but wasn't sure.
 

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I finally got back to looking at the problem.

The cover for the crawl space was made about 1 1/2" too short in length. Instead of fixing it, which would have meant almost starting over, he cut a 1x8 to the width and just laid it across the opening along the house side. Then put the cover on and pushed it against the 1x8, Since the crawl space is right at an inside corner of the house, that presented 3 places water can leak in.

I think the right thing to do is to build it correctly so it fits, and then put flashing right above the cover on both sides of the corner, pushing any water away from the house onto the cover.

I have the floor mat from my van which I replaced with gym tiles. It feels like rubber, but I assume it is plastic. It is large enough I could use it to cover the new cover and save me a bunch of money. I'm planning on doing it unless someone gives me a really good reason not to.

I'm going to have a very short time period to get this done and as it is, I have all kinds of lumber except what I need.
I think that is one of the right directionsto go.

looking at the photo again, as others mention, your gutter is slanted down, not level across. That just looks all wrong. Need to fix the gutters for this all to work out right. Unless we are seeing an optical illusion.

Paul
 

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Hard to tell from the picture, but it looks like your gutter is a lot lower than the roof edge. Gutter also looks tilted away from the house, like it’s loose.
If that gutter were raised and leveled it would work a lot better. They also make wider gutters.
Is all the water coming in through that cover? Are you getting it through the wall too? Ground outside of the house should pitch away from the house.
This is the problem , it looks like the roof on the right is a couple inches taller , so the water shoots over the gutter , the roof is not very big 4” gutter should work .
It looks like they did not Match the soft facia hight so the gutter on the left looks high the gutter on the right look low .
You could get a 6” gutter
 

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I bought a used mobile home to put on our acreage back in 2007 or 2008. Got a good deal, but the kid I bought it from had used plastic vapour barrier to staple to the floor joists to hold the floor insulation in place. I spent about a week on my back, tearing out that vapour barrier and replacing it with a breathable belly-fabric. You could see where condensation had pooled on the warm side of the barrier, and I had to replace a number of insulation batts as a result.

Once I had the belly fabric installed, I laid the vapour barrier on the ground (as described by others here) to keep the moisture out of the crawl space. When you do that, you make sure that you aren't getting rainwater running off and underneath. However, in winter, some snow would inevitably blow in through the skirting edges, and in spring would melt. That would evaporate pretty easily once the vents were opened though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
I think that is one of the right directionsto go.

looking at the photo again, as others mention, your gutter is slanted down, not level across. That just looks all wrong. Need to fix the gutters for this all to work out right. Unless we are seeing an optical illusion.

Paul
I was looking at it tonight and this is how I see it. I can take a picture tomorrow.

The drip edge extends down about 2" and the gutter is installed just below the drip edge. I'm calling it a drip edge but all it really does is protect the edge of the roof from water damage.

It might be the drip edge needs to be replaced and the gutter raised about 2".
 
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