Rabbit prices?

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by midkiffsjoy, Dec 27, 2005.

  1. midkiffsjoy

    midkiffsjoy Bedias, Texas

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    What do you charge???

    giggle. When dad died Mom got her chickens and I wanted to get some rabbits. To raise for me and the table. But prices are ranging wildly from the $6.00 I paid each for my Harliquins, to $10.00 at Easter for Californians at the feed store to $35.00 a piece for juviniles and on up further and further. DO people really do a brisk business with such high priced bunnies???

    Surrounded by californians, wondering where all the NZs went.....ponder
     
  2. rabbitgal

    rabbitgal Ex-homesteader

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    A lot of that depends on the quality of the rabbits. Rabbits from a breeder who's breeding to improve their bloodline, who has their rabbits objectively evaluated to keep high standards of quality (showing, or commercial production), and who operates their rabbitry on sound business principals are naturally going to cost more because the breeder has more invested. Some folks think they're making money selling grade rabbits for $5, but they've never run the numbers to find out if they actually are. In reality, they probably aren't!

    It's also an issue of charging what the market can bear. People who are looking for better-quality rabbits usually expect to pay more for them, and can, in fact, be suspicious of rabbits that are TOO cheap. $6.00-$10.00 ea. is basically what you could expect to get from a meat packer. (There's a huge difference in quality between rabbits you send to the processor and rabbits you keep or sell for breeding and showing.)

    Most show folks in my area charge around $25 and up for breeding stock. My *stated* price for Californians is $25-$40 each depending upon how old they are and how good of quality I think they are. My pet bunnies also sell for about $25 or so, because I feel that charging higher prices for pets will help discourage the kind of people who won't take care of their animals.

    I could probably sell more rabbits if I charged less, but I'm not necessarily selling show/breeding/pet rabbits to get rich. That's what the FRYERS are for. :D The show and breeding rabbits are excess from my breeding program.

    Sorry for the long post. :)
     

  3. midkiffsjoy

    midkiffsjoy Bedias, Texas

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    That's about what I'd expect to pay. I'm raising rabbits for my table. But to me $75.00 for a breeder seems a little silly (unless its ACTULLY REGISTERED, not just pedigreed). I guess its just cause its seems like the only rabbits being bred in my area are show rabbits. I can understand show quality rabbits being more expensive (though we're talking 4H's here.....I just couldnt charge a kid that kind of money for a D^&^% rabbit.....but then Ive been witness to some terrible victim-asation of 4H kids) but even show rabbits wind up in the pot sooner or later. giggle. shake head.
     
  4. rabbitgal

    rabbitgal Ex-homesteader

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    Yeah, $75 is a bit much for even a show rabbit, unless it was a top-winning registered grand champion or something. Back in the Belgian Hare boom in the early 1900's, some animals went for thousands of dollars. This was back in the 20s and 30s!

    You're right about even show bunnies usually ending up in the stewpot...I just butchered a registered show quality doe today because she didn't seem to want to conceive. After five tries, I figured, ENOUGH! :p
     
  5. Aintlifegrand

    Aintlifegrand Well-Known Member

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    What is a fair price to pay for a german angora?
     
  6. CountryGoalie

    CountryGoalie Well-Known Member

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    To me, if the rabbit is registered, it's not that big of a difference anyway - it's been a while since I've registered any of my stock, but if I remember right, it cost me about three dollars per head. Granted, yes, you are the one going through the effort to get it registered, but to drive the price up another fifteen dollars for your three-dollar cost... it doesn't make sense to me. Then again, if it was a grand champion - therefore, it is actually winning on the show table, and not just void of disqualifying conditions - that I would pay more for. There are some downright horrible animals out there that could pass to be registered, but that wouldn't do a thing on the show table. It's just how it is.

    What's frustrating for me is that there are quite a few Harlequin breeders in my state now - as opposed to the three of us that were around when I got started eight years ago - and there are some that are so desperate to get rid of their culls that they're selling them for five or ten dollars at the shows. With the markings in our breed, chance sometimes seems to play a good part - I've gotten a couple of gorgeous rabbits from a couple of mediocre-to-good parents, and I've bred BOB-winners together and gotten nothing near the quality of the parents - so when someone looks and says, "Well, I can get a couple of rabbits from them for just fifteen dollars total!" when you're trying to sell stock that you've invested a great deal in the bloodline of, for a decent price, it can get real frustrating real fast. I rarely take stock to be sold at shows, unless they're just the right age and I haven't culled yet - or if it's an outstanding litter and I just can't keep all the nice ones. Generally, the lesser-marked ones are culled for dog food (we feed them a raw diet) - and those that I sell as brood or show stock, generally email me and they end up reserving certain rabbits and I'll bring them to a show with me already spoken for.

    Needless to say, it's going to make things very interesting next spring when I downsize my herd. My mother has agreed to keep on twenty rabbits to maintain my bloodline while I'm at college, and everything else has to go. I've got some nice rabbits out there that I'm curious to see if I can even sell them for a decent price. Some of my brood does aren't the best-looking, but they produce nicely - and there's no way I'm selling a proven brood doe for less than twenty-five because I've seen what they can do. I'm getting a headache just thinking about it. :bash:
     
  7. midkiffsjoy

    midkiffsjoy Bedias, Texas

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    NOD NOD I understand completely (looking at it from a cattle point of view, cause its the only way I can look at it relitivly).

    I hate it when kids go to collage and have to sell their animals. Ive seen some VERY nice horses go because of that, and I dont really understand that myself. To me going to collage is just that, not leaving forever....but then thats me. oh well.

    Now see....if what I WANTED was show stock and I was buying BREEDERS (not just breeding age...read 6 months old, NEVER ACTULLY BRED, have NO IDEA how'd she do.......for 75.00) or something that had been on the winners table than I could understand (though I'd shoot myself before I'd ever spend thousands on a rabbit.....But then I cant IMAGINE anyone NOT putting out the money for a good bull) I would totally be there. Sometimes it just seems that the whole "show" thing has pushed livestock out of the price range for eating. I feel like I am a target cause I dont know a thing about show and dont intend to ever get into that. I want to raise em cause my Gandfather raised them, for the table, and for the fun of rasing them. Sometimes it just seems that youre stuck getting show stock (or paying high prices cause they are CALLED show stock, wether they are or not) wether thats what you want or not because that's all there is. hummmmm Slap me if that was incoherient. giggle. Dont mean to come across as extremely stupid, but I feel sometimes like its just too easy to get taken advantage of.

    As for Angoras. ANY angoras are expensive down here because you just CANT get them....anywhere. Demand is BIG, but supply is ITTYBITTY!!!!
     
  8. dlwelch

    dlwelch Well-Known Member

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    My NZW are priced according to conformation, age, and sex.

    Show quality breeding stock will range from $35 to $75.00.
    I have a waiting list for these rabbits. Many of these sales are
    to 4H/FFA exhibitors who wish to raise their market pens OR
    producers who raise for that market.

    Having good quality rabbits can do a lot to jump start a beginning
    exhibitor's project who wishes to raise a winning market pen and
    make that livestock auction that will return thousands of $$$$
    for their market pens. Other sales are to commercial (for
    profit) breeders who wish to improve type, conformation and dressout
    percentages in their rabbits.

    *Commercial* and/or breeding stock for home production ranges
    from $15.00 to $40.00.

    The top end of the pricing is for a "proven" buck. The purchaser
    doesn't have to travel hundreds of miles, purchase a buck, and
    not know whether it is an aggressive fertile sire. As a business
    person, I can't see growing out a rabbit, obtaining production
    data while eliminating a portion of the gamble for another producer
    and not charge accordingly.

    Since we have a waiting list for breeding stock, I would say that
    business is pretty good.....maybe not *brisk*.....but still good.
    I have a profitable outlet for all the rabbits I raise from 100+ does.
    (I don't sell pets or "easter bunnies" )

    As with anything else, the buyer should be knowledgeable about what
    he/she wants to purchase. There are many breeders along the Texas
    I45 corridor who raise commercially for Pel-Freez as well as the
    reptile and raw feeding markets. Very few commercial breeders
    are into the hobby/exhibition aspect of rabbits.



    ************************************
    Linda Welch
    http://www.texasrabbitconnection.com
    http://www.texasrabbitconnection.com/forums/
     
  9. Denise K.

    Denise K. Well-Known Member

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    I agree with Linda on rabbit prices. Ours are pretty close even though she is in Texas and I am in Washington! I have a waiting list for all 4 breeds that I raise. black New Zealands, Californians, Havanas and Florida Whites. If your interested in raising rabbits research the different breeds, decide what you want to use them for ie: show, meat, or pets. Don't expect to buy a fryer rabbit and have it be a great producer. There are to many variables. If you want to raise your own brood does for fryers then let the breeder know. They know which does go on to produce good producing daughters! If you want to buy a proven brood doe be prepared to wait, its rare that I sell a proven brood doe unless you have made prior arrangements with me (but I'll plan on selling her daughters)
    Do you make money on the rabbits? Thats the goal, but remember there are many variables in that answer! From selling fryers, prepared rabbits, breeding stock and show stock that was my goal, but now after a dog attack :mad: on the maternity barn 3 weeks ago. I just want to get back on my feet as quick as possible.
    Denise
     
  10. dlwelch

    dlwelch Well-Known Member

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    The same goes for me regarding the "proven" does. Since rabbits
    are so sensitive to change, I am very hesitant to sell a "proven" doe.
    She might be an excellent producer for me and then fall to pieces
    in a new environment under different management. It would not
    serve my reputation well to be accused of selling a doe who
    should have been "culled" instead of sold as a breeder.

    Denise, on another forum, I read about your bad experience with the
    dogs. We had that happen several years ago except we suspect
    a large domestic cat or small bobcat. I lost several does and litters
    as a result. Hope things return to normal for you quickly!

    [​IMG]
     
  11. rabbitgal

    rabbitgal Ex-homesteader

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    Yeah, I think I'd have to agree with you on the "proven doe" issue. Still waiting for a litter from a "bred proven doe" I bought this spring, although in all fairness, I was able to save ONE of her kits after she kindled on the wire. :( I would rather buy youngsters (like everyone else) now.

    If you let the breeder know that you're just looking for BREEDING stock vs. show quality rabbits, they will probably charge you less. There's a lot of cosmetic faults in rabbits that render them unsuitable for showing, but in no way affect their potential as breeding animals. Off colored toenails or body smuts in Californians, for instance.
    You might also luck out and find a real deal on good quality animals just because the breeder is short on space or needs to downsize. But generally, if you want good stock, expect to pay for them!

    Hoppy New Year!