Qu's: predator hot wires and fence charger location

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Nancy_in_GA, Dec 26, 2006.

  1. Nancy_in_GA

    Nancy_in_GA Well-Known Member

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    We're thinking seriously about adding two (1-low and 1-high) hot wires to the outside of our existing fence for predators. It is 48" field fence with T & PT wood posts, and one strand of barbed wire about 4" above the field fence. So far all of the dogs that enter our property do so by going OVER the fence.

    Where is the best place to locate the top wire---above the barbed wire, or extending toward the outside? I assume the dog would have to touch two wires to get zapped, right?

    And is it possible to put the charger near the house rather than on the fence, so that you could check it without going out to the pasture (about 300 feet from the house)?
     
  2. enjoy the ride

    enjoy the ride Well-Known Member

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    I don't know about the predator part but I have my charger in the garage by the back door so I can remember easily to turn it off if I need it and to make sure it's charging. Having said that, it is still possible for a line to be down or touching somewhere, so you still have to check. I saw a product (I think in Jeffers??) that you can hang on a fence- it flashes if the fence is charging. That might help you if you have a lot of acreage.
     

  3. topside1

    topside1 Retired Coastie Supporter

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    Yes, dogs or whatever would have to make contact with your hot wire and any other portion of your fencing system. The metal T-Posts and field fencing will act as the ground rather than the animal’s paws and dirt. If the problem dogs amount to only a few I personally would come up with another solution to eliminate the predators or nuisance dogs. Adding the electric wires may solve your problem, sounds expensive and possibly more work than it's worth. If you don't know it, once the electric wire becomes tangled, or is touching any other piece of your metal fence system it's grounded and the shock factor for intruders is zero. First think outside the box and you may come up with some other interesting ideas....
     
  4. topside1

    topside1 Retired Coastie Supporter

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    Nancy why are the dogs climbing your fencing? What is their motive?
     
  5. lgslgs

    lgslgs Well-Known Member

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    Our charger is in our garage (which is not very far from the perimeter fence.)

    Nancy - have you seen the fence alarms you can get for electric fences? They are a bright red blinking light. You hang them on the fence and they only go on when the current is out or low.

    Nice for letting you know you've lost current somewhere out of sight.

    You can get them at Kencove (online fencing company) or Tractor Supply. Only a couple of bucks each, and the batteries last a long long time.

    Lynda
     
  6. pyrnad

    pyrnad Well-Known Member

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    Amimals, unlike us humans can smell the electricity in the fence, and will avoid it. they will go through it without any problem( they will not get zapped by it). Are you having a dog or coyotee problem? Is your livestock getting injured or killed?
     
  7. Nancy_in_GA

    Nancy_in_GA Well-Known Member

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    Well I've thought about this a long time, actually. I've counted 8 different dogs on our property in the last year. They aren't particularly interested in the goats, but the goats don't realize this. Christmas day was the last straw. We found the goats hovering in the corner of the pasture in the pouring rain, because three dogs were nosing around the barn.

    Actually I was hoping this would serve a dual purpose. The back side of our property is very hilly, requires going out on an ATV and then walking some where even the ATV won't go. So we are a bit lax about checking the fence regularly. I thought this might tell us when we need to go check. Maybe it will tell us more often than necessary?

    I found the fence alert gadget on the Kencove page and that is a great idea.

    I know nothing about electric fence but I'm trying to learn how it works, about the ground field, etc. Tempted to try to do it myself, but probably can't.

    Thanks for the advice.
     
  8. enjoy the ride

    enjoy the ride Well-Known Member

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    Had a thought - maybe if you put a hot wire across the top of the fence and put a grounding wire standing off the fence 6 inches out and about 4-6 inches down from it- then when dogs, who tend to jump something by using their feet to push off the top of a jump, might very well come into contact with both wires at the same time. I will say that if you can get this to work, dogs are hypersensative to being shocked and would probably not come around again. Of course if they go under.......
     
  9. Nancy_in_GA

    Nancy_in_GA Well-Known Member

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    That's what the lower wire would be for. But this brings up another question.... would it fry our barn cat if he touched it, or would he have to get caught in the fence before it hurt him?
     
  10. topside1

    topside1 Retired Coastie Supporter

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    Like I mentioned earlier the entire woven wire four foot fence acts as a ground wire, it's attached to metal t-post driven into the ground. I just see failure and frustration, but that's just me. I agree something needs to be done quickly, I would be devastated if one of my goats was killed by homeless dogs. How about adding more strands of barb wire above woven wire fencing??? Here in Tennessee shotgun blasts in the general vicinity works wonders. Not trying to kill the dog, but it scares them so bad they never return. Enough said..
     
  11. sunflower-n-ks

    sunflower-n-ks Well-Known Member Supporter

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  12. pourfolkes

    pourfolkes Well-Known Member

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    We were having a huge predator problem, so I got a LGD puppy. Now, as a puppy he, too was defenseless so we put an electric wire about 3" from the bottom and 6" from the top of the fence. With my fence, they only have to touch the wire to get zapped, they don't have to touch any part of the fence. Within 2 nights, I heard a pack of coyotes yelping as they tried to get into the goat pen. Needless to say, they went elsewhere in search of food. Now, between the fence and my full grown LGD, I have not lost even one chicken or goat to predators in almost a 18 months or so. The only chickens I have lost were 3 that the dog was "playing" with while he was in the training stage, which, thankfully, we are through with...lol.
     
  13. Dee

    Dee Well-Known Member

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    I have woven wire as fencing around my property. I have a strand of electric 6 inches off the ground on the inside to not only keep the goats in but the predators out.

    I also had coyotes howling two nights in a row in the same general area. When I checked, the rain has washed out a spot and the coyotes would touch the fence when trying to crawl under. I filled in the hole, then... ah hem... peed on the spot and didn't have problems again.

    I did have a neighbor's dog jump over the fence to get at my goats. He was big enough to clear the fence without footholds. If I didn't find the owners, I would have put extender holders up (these are 6 inches long) on the outside so the dog would not have an easy time jumping it. Saw this at a small zoo by me to keep the raccoons in their pens without a top.

    Another thing I did, when I first put it up, was put peanut butter on the hot wire. Once licked off, the dog didn't go near it again.

    My charger is in the barn. 300 feet would be a long distance to run from the house to your pasture.... unless you get a super strong charger. Solars weren't strong enough for me.

    If done right, the electric line will not hit the woven fence unless down (now, I didn't say I did it right, considering I put my fence up on trees and up and down hills and rocks...) I know the fence is down if the charger's meter is low and will fix the fence. Didn't need an additional light. I did invest in a meter to show me where the fence was down though. Sometimes sends me in the wrong direction but it helps alot.
     
  14. Nancy_in_GA

    Nancy_in_GA Well-Known Member

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    The only reason to have the controller so far from the fence is to be able to disconnect it during a thunderstorm from the house, without going out in the rain, or after dark.

    Do you think this would work?....

    Run a single underground electric line from the house down to the fence, install an outdoor receptacle near the fence, and plug the controller into this receptacle. Then just throw the breaker to disconnect this line?

    Then hang one of those battery operated strobe flasher gadgets on the fence where we can see it from the house, at least at night.

    What do you think?
     
  15. Dee

    Dee Well-Known Member

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    I will usually shut mine off if I know there is a storm coming BUT I also disconnect the wire from the controller because the lightening will travel through the wire and hit it even without the power being on. I had one blow the faceplate across the barn and dent a metal cabinet standing 10 feet away. Usually it's just replacing the fuses though.

    I do have lightening rests that I never installed. These are suppose to stop the lightening before it gets to the controller. (it's a curly wire and plastic stop) It was so confusing on my set-up that I just never did it.

    You would also have to make a shelter for the controller, it cannot be out in the elements. I never liked the Solar ones....didn't seem strong enough.

    (I thought about doing the breaker thing too until I found out about lightening traveling through the wire....the hard way)
     
  16. Nancy_in_GA

    Nancy_in_GA Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, Dee, that makes sense. I was thinking backwards.

    I'm going to go do some reading and planning. If we decide to do this, I'll post an update about how it worked out, and how much it costs, just in case someone wants to know.

    Thank you all for all the information. It helped a lot.

    Nancy