Quick help on field fence, please...

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by DayBird, Feb 24, 2005.

  1. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    We're having a roll of field fiencing delivered in the morning, along with a telephone pole to mount the power box for the new mobile home. We've got to get something up very quickly so we can bring Sam, our beloved Great Pyrenees. I've sited out the area I want to fence in, and if it's feasible, there are enough trees in just the right places that I can nail the field fence to them with very few metal posts in between. Is this a good idea, even for a temporary fix or is there some unseen problem I'll encounter later? My PawPaw said to go ahead and do it and quit worrying about it. What do y'all think? How can I stretch it without a tractor, atv or something similar?
     
  2. crashy

    crashy chickaholic goddess

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    We just pulled ours tight and fastened it. We have 2 rotties and a shepard kept them in till we built the wooden fence...watch out for digging tho we did have an escape one time glad we were home. I think for temporary it will be fine just keep and eye out.
     

  3. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    .........................Trying to juryrig field fence around tree(s) is a bad idea in my opinion . My idea would be to get some either 6x6 or 8x8 treated posts . dig a 4 foot deep by 12 inch diameter hole and TAMP them into the ground . You need something with a round head about 4 inches in diameter . Also , see if H.Depot or Lowes has those Big , round , 16 foot long poles as You can cut them in Half and have 2 8 foot posts to tamp into the ground and they are easy to staple TOO . I am emphasizing Tamping here because it is infinitely Faster than cement as Cement needs to cure for atleast 5 days BEFORE you stretch any wire on the posts . Really , you should be Building a corner for each turn which should have 3 posts . They Don't all 3 have to be big posts , just the Corner one and use a 4x4 or so for the smaller ones .
    .........................A roll of Field fence is 330 feet long which means you could have a square pen of about 75 feet on 4 sides , OR build a rectangle type of pen with each end being 40 feet wide , then you could make the sides about 110 feet long , which is 40 + 40 + 110 +110 =300 feet . I'm using 300 instead of 330 to leave you with 30 extra feet for insurance .
    ......................... Stretching Wire ...... first...get a 10 foot 2x6 , then cut it in half . Now get some 1\2 inch lag bolts about 4 inches long with fender washers for the Nut side . Put both boards together and drill about 6 holes all the way thru with a drill motor . Also , you will need some steel cable to hook around the Top and Botton Lag bolt TOO which you will attach a Come along to stretch the wire . The wire will be Squeezed BETWEEN the 2x6(s) ....When You tighten Down on those Lag bolts so it will NOT slide along the Wire when you start cranking on your comealong . Very simple actually . Hook the comealong to a Pickup bumper on the 2 inch ball IF you have one . The wire will be 47 inches high so the Comealong should be centered around , no higher than 30 inches off the ground . Otherwise , it will have a tendency to Raise the wire off the ground ......I probably didn't explain very well but It's FREE so don't be too hard on my grammer . I spent 4 years in the 3rd. grade doing post graduate study so I'm fully educated and Rounded out in my Dottage , have fun , fordy.. :eek: :)
     
  4. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    You would have a better temporary fence if you were to nail a plank vertically to each tree then secure the fence to the board. That way the tree will not grow into the wire. Additionally, you can take 2 planks and sandwich the wire between them with a couple of bolts through holes drilled in the boards and use a comealong to tighten the wire by pulling on the boards. Using the same 2 boards with them located near a tree you can use a pry bar to apply pressure on the boards leveraging off the tree.
     
  5. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    I know it's a "bad idea" as it's not the proper way to do it. Assuming that I had both time and money, this would be the way to go. I really have neither. We're trying to move out of this place this weekend. I only have tomorrow to get the power pole set and the wires hooked up AND put up some sort of temporary fence. I was planning on using a minimum amount of staples going into the trees so that the fence would be easier to take down later and put back up properly. My plan is ot fence in an area approximately 75 X 75. Once we're moved and settled a bit, I'll have plenty of time to do it correctly.

    I guess I was just looking for reassurance here. I'm pretty much gonna have to do it this way, whether I like it or not. I cannot see any other practical solutions. I've got to get a fence around the shed and cat cage before we move any other animals so Sam can do what he does best and keep people and other dogs away from our menagerie.

    Now for a question:
    How do you dig a 4 feet hole straight down with post hole diggers? Do they make sets with especially long handles? I'm 6'2" and the post hole diggers are only 5' tall. I started about 1pm digging the hole for the power pole. Alabama Power said it needs to be 4 feet in the ground, put in two bags of QuickCrete around the bottom of the pole and finish filling the hole with chunks of broken concrete block and packed Earth. I've got the hole about 3'4" deep before I gave up. I was literally throwing the digger straight down into the hole, bending over and pulling up scoops full of red clay. One hole and I'm very tired tonight.
     
  6. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ..............Don't WORRY about that last few inches!!! Clean out the hole that you have , get your pole as plumb as possible , mix your cement , pour in the hole . You might want to get one more sack of Sackcrete as I'm thinking you probably purchased 60 pound sacks . Leave the Top 4 inches of the whole clear and just fill in with dirt . If it was me , I would get an 8 foot ground rod from Hd or Lowes and drive it in next to the pole since the first 3 foot is already dug so it should be easy . Then you can run a ground from your main breaker panel on the pole to the ground rod . Leave about a foot sticking UP above ground level . In fact , I would ASK the power company to run a Piece of #6 solid copper from the main breaker panel over to the ground rod. Call them up and ask them IF THEY PLAN on putting IN a ground round next to your Power pole then maybe you won't have TOO . Either way I would want it there as it might prevent a lightening strike from traveling past the main breaker panel as voltage will be looking for the shortest path to ground . fordy... :eek: :)
     
  7. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My dad had several sawmill owners in the family, & we cut up all our own firewood.

    I was taught when I was 6 or 7 to not ever, ever, put metal into a tree. Not ever.

    I have not ever done so since.

    Many people do, but I really don't care for the isea.

    --->Paul
     
  8. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    I thought I'd give it another shot in the morning, just so I can say I did it correctly. The pole is 10 inches in diameter at the bottom and the hole is almost exactly 12 inches.

    I have to supply the ground rod. I bought the box already put together and mounted on the board. It has the entrance wire coming out of the top and the copper ground wire from the bottom. It came with all the necessary mounting bolts, clamps and even the ground rod. It's 8 feet long, 1/2 diameter, solid, and galvanized...just like Alabama Power specified. Apart from the box/kit, all I had to buy was the pole and the 200 amp, 4 wire to go into the house. I've never wired anything other than chandeliers and ceiling fans before so I have an Uncle coming to help me in the morning. If we can get it all done early enough, Alabama Power will come and hook it up before dark tomorrow. If not, we'll have to wait until Monday.

    I hope to eventually learn more, reduce our usage, and one day be at least mostly solar powered.



    I think nailing the fencing to the trees will make a decent, temporary dog pen. I can understand about the hazards of a tree growing into a fence though, especially for a saw mill operator.
     
  9. Valmai

    Valmai Well-Known Member

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    How about 2 posts 'however' far apart you like with a single strand of wire between them, properly secured, and attach the dog on a leash to the wire. A quick easy temporary solution.
     
  10. Cindy in KY

    Cindy in KY Well-Known Member

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    When I dug the hole for a power pole with the post hole digger, I dug out a step about a foot down right off to the side of the hole. The step was only big enough for my 2 feet to stand on. I sat on the ground with my feet in the step and just worked the hole deeper and deeper till it was 3 ft lower than the step. I put some large rocks in the step as it was being filled in. You can do it!
     
  11. Topaz Farm

    Topaz Farm Well-Known Member

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    Can't help you with your fence question.

    I have a question. Why do you need to do the power company's job by digging the hole for the pole? Our power company came with all the equipment needed to dig the hole and put the pole in the ground.
     
  12. Cornhusker

    Cornhusker Unapologetically me Supporter

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    We had a new pole put in, and the power company brought the pole, meter, yard light, ground rod, the whole works, came out, dug the hole, put everything up and never charged us a dime.
    And I agree about the fence, t-posts aren't that high around here, I think 3.29 apiece. It's so much easier to do it right the first time.
    I would use good wood posts for the corners and gates tho, and box the corners or they'll give you fits later.
     
  13. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    I guess the only answer I can give is "because it's Alabama Power." They're the ones that estimated our usage for three months without telling us because they were afraid of Sam, our beloved Great Pyrenees. The only reason I questioned it was because they were raising our "budget billing" each month. That mess is a total sham.

    We did get everything we were responsible for hooked up. It really wasn't that big of a deal. The pole wasn't nearly as heavy as I thought. The wire wasn't nearly as difficult to cut as I had been told. It was very simple and straighforward and I think I could do it again if I'm ever crazy enough to move in the future. The co-op was almost 2 hours late delivering the pole so we didn't make the deadline to have it hooked up today so we have to wait until Monday.
     
  14. Rowdy

    Rowdy Well-Known Member

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    As for the half serious question about long post hole diggers... Yes, they make them. When I was working for a pole line company down in houston I got the fun task of using them when we could not get the truck in. Seven and 1/2 feet deep holes with a pair of post hole diggers.
    We also set alot of fairly large transformers by hand too, but that is another story....

    Rowdy
     
  15. Topaz Farm

    Topaz Farm Well-Known Member

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    Daybird hope you get moved soon, I know you are excited. I sure was.

    I think I'll just stay here with our co-op, they come do it all. Plus if they have a used pole on the truck and you want it, they will unload it.