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I am surprised at the lack of useful information on the web about this disease.
Maybe somebody here can help.
How do you know if your chickens have it? How do you get rid of it? If my chickens have it then do their eggs have it?
I never worried about it but I have been eating a half dozen raw eggs a day from my chickens with no problems, then a friend mentioned the disease. And I started doing research......
 

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Well, what have you found out so far?

I have never worried about it, should I?

We have never been ill from eating my own home grown vegetables or from the meat I butcher or the eggs the poultry lays...I am sure my handling practices though far from perfect are far better then any strangers!
 
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Information about salmonella as I remember it. Back in the mid 1980’s (after several large public food poisoning outbreaks) researchers found that salmonella could be transmitted inside poultry eggs. If the hen has a high enough salmonella infection it is possible that this same hen could deposit the bacteria inside the egg (a literal bacterial time bomb). Contamination of eggs before this discovery was always assumed to be from the outside of the egg (through cracks, pores or improper egg cracking techniques).

About salmonella identification. Salmonella belong to a large group of bacteria species that are classified as gram-negative rods. Gram-negative is a simple staining technique (bacteria are either positive or negative) and rod is the shape that the bacteria look like under a microscope. All mammals (even you) have in the gut numerous types of gram-negative bacteria generically termed enterobacteria (ecoil shingella etc). Most look identical under a microscope to each other and to salmonella. To make matters worse, salmonella (and all gram negative bacteria) have different “species”. Some species of salmonella are harmless and live in the gut along with everybody else. Some are very pathogenic. To find pathogenic salmonella in this mess requires very specific scientific equipment and a lab that knows what to look for. Could you have you chickens tested? Probably, but the cost would be prohibitive to the homeowner.

What to do. Keep an eye on your chickens and keep their environment clean. If things going in and out of your birds look normal then the chances your birds have a high enough infection to transmit it to you are low. If the chickens are kept under filthy conditions, eat dirty food/water and appear unhealthy, you might want to look else ware for your poultry products.

Best method to avoid salmonella or any other enterobacteria is to wash you food, keep it hot or keep it cold and to cook your food. People most susceptible to salmonella (or any other enterobacteria) are the very young, the very old or people with a compromised immune system (HIV, flu, advanced cold etc). If you fall into this category, you might want to avoid raw eggs no matter where they came from. Switch to pasteurized eggs or cooked egg products.
 
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That is exactly the information I was looking for.I'm going to continue to eat my eggs and not worry about it. My chickens are healthy and happy.
Thank you so much.
 

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I read that the FDA study on salmonella in fresh uncracked eggs found that the tendency to have a heavy ovarian Salmonella load and transmit it into the eggs was an inherited trait strongly present in the major commercial layer breeding flocks.
It was just a lot easier and cheaper to tell the public to cook their eggs rather than replace all these high producing commercial layer strains. The Salmonella is literally bred in.
A very educational book is "Spoiled" by Nicols Fox. The whole book is a darn good reason to "grow your own"!
 

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Maybe this information will help.

Raw Eggs for Your Health
By J. Mercola, D.O.

Raw whole eggs are a phenomenally inexpensive and incredible source of high-quality nutrients that many of us are deficient in, especially high-quality protein and fat.
http://www.mercola.com/2002/nov/13/eggs.htm
 

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eat a can of jack mackerel for lunch you'll be safer and get more higher quality protiens and fats.

I'll cook my eggs, thanks for the info tho.. :p
 

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Quite honestly, to me, raw eggs and jack mackerel are both disgusting. :eek:

Have a blast guys. :haha:
 
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