questions about a jersey steer

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by GoldenWood Farm, Jul 31, 2004.

  1. GoldenWood Farm

    GoldenWood Farm Legally blonde! Supporter

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    May 31, 2003
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    Oregon
    Hi,
    I am looking into getting a jersey calf/steer to raise out for meat. Can a steer be able to live on a 1/2 acre of land if I supplemented his feed? Plus how long do they need to be on a lambar? I am totally new to cows. Any advise would be great!

    MotherClucker
     
  2. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you are buying the calf, a holstien would be most peoples choice of dairy calf because they grow faster, get bigger, and have white fat like beef cattle. The Jerseys have yellow fat. 1/2 acre would be enough room for the calf, but it wouldn't likely produce enough grass for the calf the second year. You would need hay and grain to supplement the grass, and that would be the entire ration through the winter. I don't know what you are referring to when you say lambar. The calf would be getting nearly 2 years old when it is ready to butcher by most standards, but that don't mean you can't butcher it much sooner if you wish to.
     

  3. I thought you could butcher at a year...hmm shows how wrong I am. A lambar is a way to bottle raise them. Since I would get it at like a day old and raise it my self on my goats milk. I truthfully prefer a jersey to a holstein and fat color doesn't matter much to me.

    MotherClucker
     
  4. OD

    OD Well-Known Member

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    We butcher all the steer calves out of my Jersey cow, I can't understand why people have such a problem with yellow fat. I think Jersey meat tastes great. We usually butcher ours at about 10 months old & they usually weigh about 950 pounds. They are only half Jersey though. A full blood Jersey would take longer to get ready to butcher. He would need to be fed milk for at least 2 months, or longer if you want him to grow faster.
     
  5. Night Owl

    Night Owl Active Member

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    Jul 20, 2004
    Location:
    California
    Hi,
    I've bottle raised a few calves. I bought mine at a livestock auction, not always the best place to start, but I've had good luck. Usually, they aren't "day old", they are 3 day old at least. The calf should stay with his mom for the first three days to get the colostrum. The dairy owner would not be using her milk during this time anyway. Our auction is only once a week, so if you're lucky, you can even get a 6 day old calf. That is one that will already be on the bottle. I go through the pen and see which calf will come up and suck on my fingers. Then I choose the strongest of the bunch. The better start you can give yourself will make a big difference. The calf should stay on bottle at least 2 months, but not more than 3 months. You will have to make sure he is accustomed to eating hay and grain as you start to wean him.
    I have goats and cows, too. They are so wonderful!
     
  6. Janene in TX

    Janene in TX Member

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    Jun 27, 2004
    Location:
    South Central Texas
    I brought my Jersey (now) steers home in November...one still had the dried umbilical chord. Weaned them off the bottle at 2 months. They are now around 500-550# & 47 inches tall (at the hip) at 8 months old. One will get butchured this fall & the other one next spring sometime. I feed them each 3/4 full of a big coffee can of regular calf creep feed 2 times a day & all the pasture & mineral/salt they want. The grass is getting brown now so at night I give them each a flake of grass hay. (I would prefer Alfalfa or an Alfalfa mix hay, but I am too cheap to pay $8 for one small square bale!! Got 130 bales hay for free [1st cutting] for a barter of stud fee for breeding my horse to a mare--not the best hay in the world, but better than nothing!!)
    It's not the most scientific method of doing things, but it works for me & I don't have a gigantic feed bill every month. They go thru 100 pounds of creep feed about every 10-11 days. ($5.50/bag for 50#/comes out to around $33/month total on creep feed-or a little over $1/day for BOTH calves) The calves are averaging each about 60 pounds of weight gain a month. If I did my figures correctly :rolleyes: for every 3-4 pounds of creep feed/pasture, etc they are eating I'm getting 1 pound gain 'on the hoof'. Don't know if this is average/low/high or not....anyone have suggestions/comments??????