Question

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by gray mouse, Dec 24, 2004.

  1. gray mouse

    gray mouse Member

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    Would you drink the colostrum, or foremilk?
    Can you make yogourt out of it, or you must drink it fresh?
    Thanks.
     
  2. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    I suppose you could but I wouldn't. It's very yellow, rich and has a tendancy to curdle on top of which dairy supply factories don't collect it which would indicate that it is unuseable in terms of what they want milk for. Why do you ask as the cololstrum has usually gone within the week and the calf/calves should have had most of it
    When keeping milk for the house, I take it half way through the milking or towards the end - depending on how much cream I want.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     

  3. cloverfarm

    cloverfarm Well-Known Member

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    We saved colostrum for the newborn calves. It changes to regular milk in a few days after the cow calves, anyway. Colostrum from the older cows is best for the new calf because it has the most antibodies to boost the newborns immune system
     
  4. gray mouse

    gray mouse Member

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    I have never tasted colostrum, but now I have a chance to do so, and I was told that it is extremely healthy, and all that. It might give one a boost healthwise, don't you think so?
    Well, even if I will try it, I don't think I will die from it,--- lol.
     
  5. IMContrary

    IMContrary Well-Known Member

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    In many European countries it is considered a delicacy and used to make custards. I am sure if you did a search online you would find recipes for using it in cooking. I do know it has to be handled in cooking a lot like eggs, as it will curdle easily like they do.
     
  6. dosthouhavemilk

    dosthouhavemilk Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I would not drink colostrum...I prefer to feed it to the calves, kids(caprine), and cats.
    If we have an older, clean, animal who produces extra we store it away for emergencies.


    Nowadays, with Johne's such a big deal mixing colostrum and feeding colostrum from a mature animal to a calf other than her own is asking for trouble...unless the herd has been clean for as long as that animal has been alive.

    Really frustrating because we used to pool our colostrum to make sure the calves born to first calf heifers got that rich, bountiful colostrum from the older mature cow.

    My grandmother used to enjoy opening a container of colostrum and taking some off the top.

    Frankly, I'm not sure how it could help you much. You aren't a newborn calf and the calves absorb it through their stomach lining within the first twelve hours. It won't kill you though.


    It isn't shipped because the cow is usually dry treated, so there is antibiotic residue for the first 72 hours after birth...after that it is normal milk for the most part anyways.
     
  7. gray mouse

    gray mouse Member

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    Thanks to all of you.

    I must try it. I will have to make sure though that no antibiotic was given to the cow, and then, I will taste it,--- once in my life,---unless in the last minute my stomach will revolt, --- (which is quite possible....).

    I will see.
     
  8. jerzeygurl

    jerzeygurl woolgathering

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    yes you can i hear it is bitter, from book i read, says must be cooked to not be bitter, and like other poster said it makes a good custard, but we just save it ourselves