Question for the rose growers....

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Kazahleenah, Mar 15, 2005.

  1. Kazahleenah

    Kazahleenah Disgruntled citizen

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    My son wants me to plant roses. :| I know nothing about roses, and am constantly told they are a pain in the butt to grow. Well, I have been reading about the how-to's and such, and in conversation, a friend offered to mail me some "pieces" from some of their roses. (roots or cuttings?) What do I do with these when I get them? It's confusing enough to learn what to do with a full plant when I get it, not to mention try to root one from a piece of a plant!
    lol... it amazes me how good I did at farming and "food" gardening, yet seem like a fish in the desert with this flower thing. Are roses REALLY that hard to grow? I live on the border of zones 4 & 5... some zone 5 things do well here, but I do plan on taking a lil extra precautions for winter with the roses. (covering them etc.)
    Thank ya'll!!
    Kaza
     
  2. birdie_poo

    birdie_poo Well-Known Member

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    Well, if you want them to look pretty,give them rabbit poop. It does wonders for them. You will also have to cut them back in the winter and after summer. It helps stimulate flower growth.
     

  3. Ann Mary

    Ann Mary Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I live on the edge of a zone 4-5 , probably a bit warmer here in the winter.
    Own root roses are much hardier than grafted ones but you could try them...just plant the grafted part ( the bulge on the stem) 2-4 inches under the soil. Rabbit manure DOES do wonders for them as well as giving them 2-3 cups of rabbit food (alfalfa meal) in the late fall for mulch and early spring once they are good and growing. ( Just be careful to keep in watered because it does generate quite a bit of heat while it is decomposing) Epsom salts do amazing things for the root systems without promoting leaf growth. Make sure you prune to about waist high in the fall to prevent wind breakage and then down to about 12-18 " in the late spring(when the daffodils are blooming in your area--that's how you know when it's time to prune!) therea are books out there that explain the "hows" of rose pruning- you will get much larger blooms for your trouble. Mulch very heavily in the fall after it start frosting pretty good -around here it usually around Thanksgiving.- this will also help with the watering in the summer. Make sure you pull the mulch back away from the canes after the serious frosts are done in the spring.
    I think roses are worth the extra effort---must be why I have sooo many of them! :) That's because of the way they thank us in the summer! ;)
    Oh, in Dec. you need to dormant spray them and in the summer if you see powdery mildew or leaf spot take care of it right away or it can really ruin the pretty show! there is nothing quite like a room parfumed with the aroma of a vase of roses! (I try to get only the ones that say they are very fragrant such as fragrand cloud, perfume delight, Melody Parfume', etc. Best wishes fo you try this new venture!
     
  4. hollym

    hollym Well-Known Member

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    Kaza, I always thought that too, so I never did grow them. But then I had a moment of weakness and planted ONE and it wasn't so bad! Now I have a dozen if you count the minis.

    It's best if you find out which ones grow well in your area. Here in Texas we have specific ones that are more adapted to this climate. I just bought a Lady Banksia last night in fact! The ones that aren't grafted seem to be more trouble free? They like acid-ish soil. They like to be watered with manure tea and epsom salts with an occasional dose of iron sulfate. They need to be watered a lot!

    Minis are an easy nice way to start, if you are interested, and here you can buy them at the grocery store, Home Depot, and Wal-mart.

    Or you take the cuttings that your friends send and put rooting compound on a freshly cut end, put them in some very perlite dense potting soil, or some special seed starting soil, cap them with some loose plastic, keep them damp and wait for them to grow roots.

    hollym
     
  5. jdskidder

    jdskidder Well-Known Member

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    Roses aren't hard to grow. They love banana peels, used coffee grounds and ground up egg shells; stuff that is pretty numerous around my house. LOL

    Don't be shy in cutting them back in the Spring either, they will bounce right back and give you plenty of blooms.

    Dorian
     
  6. Kazahleenah

    Kazahleenah Disgruntled citizen

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    This is all such great advice!! thank you! (I've been copying/pasting to print it off to make my own lil "How-to"grow-roses" book) lol
    Do they need special care for winter? besides burlap? It gets a bit brisk here in the winter...(up to 30 below zero max, tho that's RARE usually is -10 or -15)

    Thanks a BUNCH!!!
    Kaza
     
  7. Ann Mary

    Ann Mary Well-Known Member Supporter

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    -30 burrr!!! Make sure you get own root roses...if the tops die of they will come back up from the root and true to the species. Grafted will die back to the graft and the rootstalk will come back. I would cut them back to between knee and wasit high in the fall and then pile on the mulch... at least 12 " or so. Better safe than sorry. Some catalogs specify their roses are for the zones 4-5 and that's the kind you will need. Some people make a circular cage out of chicken wire and place it around the plane and fill it with the leaves or whatever they are mulching with. the cage helps to keep it from blowing away in the storms.
     
  8. Miz Mary

    Miz Mary Well-Known Member Supporter

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    what do you use for black spot ?!?!?!? I stuck some cuttings in the ground , how long untill they root ? if they turn black did I kill 'em ? Thanks for the tip on bunnie poo - I have 4 !!
     
  9. hollym

    hollym Well-Known Member

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    I sprayed mine with epsom salt and baking soda in water, also watered with it. Seemed to work for blackspot. Also take off all of the affected leaves and burn them, so it doesn't spread.

    hollym