Question for all you Ebay users

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Nik, Mar 25, 2005.

  1. Nik

    Nik Well-Known Member

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    I've run into some trouble and figured I'd get some more experienced advice. I bought an OLD Cub Cadet garden tractor for my 5 and 10 year olds to restore as a summer project. The seller was in Florida and sent me 3 quotes which varied by several hundred dollars. I went with Roadway, which happened to be the cheapest, since their terminal was near my office. The seller emails me the day after he shipped it that he had to go to ABF becaue Roadway couldn't off load the pallet from his truck. He said since it was a higher rate he would split the difference with me since he didn't get my approval. I told him that was fine and thought it was nice that he offered to do that. Well, the tractor arrives and the guy hands me the bill. Instead of $280.00, it's $537.00. I told him to hold on cause something must be wrong with the bill since it was almost double the quoted rate. ABF said the difference in price was because of a weight adjustment. Instead of weighing 300lbs like the seller said, it weighed almost 525lbs. I emailed the seller with what was going on and he told me he contacted the local ABF and they told him since they accepted it without weighing it, the first quote should be honored. So I go back to ABF and tell them that and they inform me that they don't weigh everything at drop off, only if something looks heavier than it says do they weigh it. The tractor didn't get weighed until it was halfway here. I've emailed the seller again over the last two days and he won't reply and the contact number he has on file with ebay is no good. I'm kind of at a loss on which way to go. Do I bite the bullet and pay double the quoted shipping, or cut my losses by refusing the load??
    Thanks,
    Nik
     
  2. Darren

    Darren Still an :censored:

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    The seller will have to provide documentation to you to prove the initial ABF quote. Email the seller and tell him that you plan to leave negative feedback if you don't hear from him. My experience with freight companies is you need to get everything including the discounts up front in writing. Once the item is on their dock ready to be delivered, you have a problem. You might check with their cutomer service and see if they'll work with you. They don't want the tractor.

    For future reference, unless I'm dealing with a company that ships freight as a normal part of their business, I make the freight arrangements. I've had good luck arranging pickup via Yellow Freight all over the country. It gets shipped COD and I know in advance what I'll pay when I go to the terminal.
     

  3. pistolsmom

    pistolsmom Well-Known Member

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    Nik.......nice to meet you! First let me say that I sell on ebay for a living and have for the past 5 years......over 18,000 feedbacks and only 4 negative because this is my living and I run a tight ship!! :} Without reading the auction myself and not knowing what the sellers terms of sale stated I would hesitate to comment. However....I will tell you that if the sellers contact # is invalid then he is in direct violation of ebay rules and should be reported. I personally wouldn't want to deal with someone who cannot be contacted and who has suddenly cost me more than $250 than I originally intended to pay!! Let us know how it turns out and good luck!
     
  4. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    You didn't say how much you paid for the item or how you made payment.

    Were it me, I would refuse to accept the tractor and have it sent back to the seller. Your case is the seller misrepresented the shipping cost (however unintentional).

    If you paid with PayPal file a complaint against the seller indicating shipping costs were well in excess of what you were told to expect.

    You might just consider it a life lesson and not try to get your money back from the seller. If he leaves a negative you can counter with your reason.

    Personally I would not purchase an item with COD shipping. I want to know in advance of bidding what the shipping cost will be. I realize here it is an estimate, but the seller should be able to come very close. Once the first shipping cost are know I want to pay it to them. They then become responsible for getting it to me. In this case if I had paid for 300 pounds, buyer should have to eat the extra shipping costs as it was his mistake, not mine.

    With as many second-hand garden tractors as they are around I am curious as to why you bought one over eBay. Any place which sells them likely has a number of trade-ins which might be had cheaply for your intended purpose.
     
  5. Nik

    Nik Well-Known Member

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    Well, the seller finally called me a little while ago and said his computer has been down, and that was why I couldn't reach him. He was as miffed at the whole situation as I am. He was going to get in touch with the corporate office of the shipping company and try and reason with them. I told him that if it couldn't be resolved with ABF I was going to refuse the load and he said he understood why and he would do the same thing. He also said we would get it worked out one way or the other. So that puts my mind at ease a little bit.

    Ken, the reason I bought it off of ebay was because it's a 1961 Cub Cadet, what they call an "original" since it was the first model made. I looked for one around here with no luck so I had to broaden my search a little bit. It wasn't that I was just looking for an old mower, I actually wanted a specific model for the restoration lesson for my kids. Shipping stuff doesn't scare me as I've sent and received Cushman scooters and motorcycles thru various shipping methods. This deal just turned out to be a little on the complicated side.

    Mainly I was wondering if I was looking at it wrong by feeling that the seller should have been responsible to make sure there was a firm shipping price. I know stuff happens, but a doubling of shipping costs is a little tough to take.

    Thanks,
    Nik
     
  6. MsPacMan

    MsPacMan Well-Known Member

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    Nik,


    I sure hope you get this resolved, and quite honestly, I don't have any advice for you.


    But I did want to CONGRATULATE you on a Terrific Find!



    A 1961 Cub Cadet is a GREAT FIND !!!!!!!!


    I have a Cub Cadet 128, which I found locally in the back of a guy's barn and picked up for 50 bucks, and in running condition at that (though it has a steering problem that my husband says he'll work on when he gets some time off from work).


    Do you plan on getting it ready for garden tractor pulls? Those old Cubs were Born to pull weights, ya know.


    Any way, congratulations once again on a GREAT FIND!
     
  7. DraftFlavored

    DraftFlavored Well-Known Member

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    Number one, the freight companies are entirely within their right to do what they have done. That is standard proceedure. One should NEVER ship common carrier without knowing the weight of the item and what class the item is being shipped.

    If the seller MIS-STATED the shipping weight prior to the close of the auction,
    it's entirely the seller's fault.

    Your in a sticky position because you did not define the limits of the freight rate you were willing to accept.

    Contact E-Bay and see if you can get out of the whole deal or get the seller to pay atleast half the shipping costs and chaulk this one up to experience.

    Good Luck to You.....Pamela :)
     
  8. DraftFlavored

    DraftFlavored Well-Known Member

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    I also meant to say..... Many of the common carriers RELY on their dock workers and forklift drivers to catch understated weights. And this allows them to jack up your rate without your knowing. The cheapest rate you can get from a common carrier is to know someone who has an account with that carrier and use them if possible. It can reduce your rates by as much as two thirds

    But it is IMPERATIVE the weights be correct to avoid problems.
     
  9. sisterpine

    sisterpine Goshen Farm Supporter

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    pistolsmom just wondering what kind of stuff you sell on ebay? thanks
     
  10. Corgitails

    Corgitails Well-Known Member

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    I recently had this situation with a very nice lady in france- I goofed on the shipping, so I ate the mistake. (Luckily, the sale price of the items covered it and I still made my listing fee back, so it was okay, but STILL! From now on, I won't quote ANY shipping until I've weighd things WIHT packaging!
     
  11. Bob_W_in_NM

    Bob_W_in_NM Well-Known Member

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    If I were you I'd go with the "split the difference" with the shipper and consider it the cost of an "education" in shipping via LTL freight. Looks like everybody acted "in good faith" and the big problem was in mis-estimation of the weight.

    I've been handling freight (Car load, less than car load, truck load, less than truck load) as a shipper, receiver, or carrier pretty much all of my adult life.

    Your shipper should have shipped the tractor to you via the carrier you requested unless he consulted you first. However, looks like the biggest change occurred when the carrier weighed the shipment and corrected the weight and the charges went up accordingly.

    All shippers Bills of Lading have "Subject to Correction" printed in the area on the bill where the weight is indicated. The weighing may not take place at the place of origin and may happen up the line somewhere.

    If you want an accurate quotation on shipment of freight there are two things you need to get correct before you call. (1) You need to have the correct weight and (2) You need to be sure the correct Uniform Freight Classification number is applied. This is what the carriers use to come up with the "dimension weight", which determines the rate. The way I explain "dimension weight" to people is that "It costs more to ship a pound of feathers than a pound of lead",
    in that the pound of feathers takes up more space in the truck trailer or whatever. There's obviously more information you need to have, but these are the two that most people that have done no more than ship a package via UPS
    aren't aware of.

    Freight costs are a big factor in the cost of doing business. When I'm ordering large or heavy merchandise for resale, one of my first questions to the seller is "How much do I have to order to receive prepaid freight?". The idea is to have the seller get it to my warehouse at their expense.
     
  12. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    My understanding is the classification determimination manual is a book about 4" thick in fine print. As Bob noted, it is a combination of weight and classification.

    Just for background, it would not have been that difficult to have weighed it in advance. For example, my local farmers' co-op has a public-access scale. Weigh the trailer without tractor and then trailer with tractor. Feed mills will have drive-on scales and perhaps several area businesses. Many truck stops have them also, but may or may not restrict use to trucks. If you ask around likely you can find a suitable scale in your area.

    In this case, if they had the owner's manual in it, weight might have been given. For farm tractors, there are quick reference guides on what the tractor weighed new.

    I now agree with Bob - split the shipping and make it a lesson learned for both parties.

    Ken Scharabok