Question About Stalls

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by luvbritts, Nov 14, 2006.

  1. luvbritts

    luvbritts Member

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    I have a 5 stall horse barn and only have 2 horses right now. The stalls are gravel floored. Was wonderin if I could raise a couple of pigs on this. What damage should I expect? The stalls are well packed as horses were using them before. I bed with sawdust and planned on using rubber pans for feed. Is there anything I can put on the gravel to control smell (ie - lime)? How long does it usually take to get them to butcher weight and what is the recommended weight? Thanks in advance.
     
  2. travlnusa

    travlnusa Well-Known Member

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    You will need to look at the stalls and see what there is to chew on. They will find it if it is there.

    We buy feeders around 50 lbs, keep them appx 4 months and butcher at appx 250lbs.

    You will have the hog smell in there for some time to come.

    The hogs will toss your rubber pans all over the place.
     

  3. R.

    R. Well-Known Member

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    Hogs love to root. No matter how well that gravel is compacted, they will root it up. My father (an old time farmer) told me that farmers used to turn out pigs where they wanted the ground plowed up, like a patch for garden.
     
  4. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Find another place to house the hogs! This info is from a previous large scale hog farmer.
     
  5. John Schneider

    John Schneider Well-Known Member

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    As usual, I agree with Agmantoo. Why would you raise them in a stall? Pigs, like horses, should not be in stalls...ever (IMO). There is quite a bit of info. here if you do a search on "fencing" or some similar word. Getting set up properly ahead of time will make your pork producing experience much more rewarding. Pastured pork is significantly more healthy than a grain based diet indoors...and will taste much better too. Good luck.
     
  6. RedHogs

    RedHogs Well-Known Member

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    I raise in stalls almost exclusively, if you are like me the pasture is too valuable to be destroyed this time of year and confinement is a non concern when away from the farm. use of two foot board across the bottom and you can easily step over to muck twice a week with your normal bedding, and the smell will be fine. I have gone the pasture route and was not very pleased with the results. if you are new to pigs, keep is simple.... worry about "superior" meat texture later if you are feeling more comfortable.
     
  7. John Schneider

    John Schneider Well-Known Member

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    Redhogs...you and I always seem to bump heads over this issue. One of these days we will simply have to just agree to disagree! LOL It's OK though...wouldn't be any fun if we all agreed and did everything the same as everyone else. I can't resist commenting though...Pasture isn't destroyed by pigs if it is grown for pigs. Pig pasture is typically annual legumes that when tilled, can be re-seeded. The pastures are a lot healthier after the rotations than when left "un-destroyed". Now...certain breeds also play a role. My Large Blacks do not root nearly as much as most other breeds and actually graze like a cow. Other heritage breeds do the same. Also, meat texture has nothing to do with a pasture based system...it is about proper care of livestock and healthful meat for people. I have raised pigs in a modern barn environment as my grandad did and the disadvantages of a pasture system do not come close to the disadvantages of raising pigs in a pen....ie disease, behavioural problems, intensive management.