Question about prime Rib

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by pcdreams, Dec 30, 2003.

  1. pcdreams

    pcdreams Well-Known Member

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    I work at a local pizza joint and today we traded for prime rib. Now I though I'd be getting a plate with cooked rib and the trimmings. To my suprise I got a Slab. I know nothing about prime rib. This stuff is in a maranade. Is it cooked? Does it need to be cooked and if so how?

    :)
     
  2. Ozarkguy

    Ozarkguy Well-Known Member

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    .

    :) Oh boy! Does this post have bachelor written all over it or WHAT?

    Sorry friend, but I don't have the slightest idea. :( But it did remind me of days gone past, when good hearted friends gave me something with "just heat it at a zillion degrees on what the heck temperature" and it's great instructions. I usually chucked it, cause I could't figure out how to cook the darn thing!
    Long time bachelor, THAT'S why God made restaurants!!!!

    I'll be watching your post here, (maybe I'll FINALLY learn something) and good luck to you! :)

    Ozarkguy

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  3. fin29

    fin29 Well-Known Member

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    Is it vacuum packed with juices? If it is, it's probably cooked. If it's not, sprinkle with lots of salt, pepper, olive oil, and rosemary, stick it in a 450 degree oven for about 15 minutes, then lower the oven to 200 degrees and cook until the meat in the center reaches 125 degrees for medium rare. Allow the roast to sit for 15 minutes before slicing. But even if it's cooked, it needs to be heated through to the same temp before serving, so you can follow the same procedure without the hot oven at the beginning.
     
  4. fin29

    fin29 Well-Known Member

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    You can also just slice it and fry or grill the steaks. That's what rib eyes are.
     
  5. Runners

    Runners A real Quack!

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    Oh my! You've got to be kidding! DO NOT PUT IT ON A GRILL (yet)! This is simple and excellent eating.

    The secret with cooking prime rib is TIME, sear and very slow cooking.

    a. Use the seasoning as suggested, salt pepper etc., and serve it up.... or...

    b. mix seasoned salt Lawrys (sp?) with beef bullion, onion powder, brown sugar and corn or peanut oil in a blender. It should be a dark brown liquid, keep blending until it starts to jell. Slowly add water, the color will change to a lighter brown as it thins a little. When you taste test it, it should be very salty and sweet and still thick! (from a famous resturant who's speciality is prime rib and lobster)

    Cover the roast with this stuff, smear it all over and then fire up the grill, as hot as possible! HIGH heat to sear! Essential for any prime rib preparation - sear first! About 3-4 minutes each side(s) and ends - it'll get crispy or carmelized (you WANT that)

    If you don't have a rotisserie - Place it in a pan (to collect the juices) Either turn down the grill (if gas), close vents (if wood) and get the cooking temp down to 175-200f. Cook for 4-6 hrs under LOW heat, below water boiling heat. Use a stick thermometer and check for an internal temp of 165f or so. The meat will have pulled slightly off the bone, serve by cutting between the ribs.

    If you do have a rotisserie - have some cotton string handy to tie up an loose spots (just in case). Low heat (200f) and let it go as long as you can stand your stomach growling - the smell is gonna make you VERY hungry, hopefully you can hold out for 3 hours... cut between the ribs to serve.

    If you have a smoker - HICKORY!!! follow any of the above, sear and slow cook. And don't be afraid to move the prime rib from the grill to an oven if you can't regulate the heat. Better to have it perfect than wish you had!

    BTW - the oil will burn, leaving a crusty coating of brown sugar & seasoning mix behind - you WANT it to sear fast, don't let a grill flare up bother you, let it burn HOT! The addition of water helps control the burn a little.

    Now why don't I get a perk like that at work any more....?
     
  6. CraftyDiva

    CraftyDiva Is anybody here?

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