Question about peas

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by DustyOpal, Jun 10, 2006.

  1. DustyOpal

    DustyOpal Well-Known Member

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    Hello,
    This year I have planted my first garden. I didn't want to go overboard with anything being it was my first time so I planted what I thought would be a fair amount of peas (after germination and such ended up with 41 plants) and found out that this is not near enough. I have read that you can plant a fall crop. I was just wondering when I could actually put them in the ground and how many I should plant for a family of four (Me, my husband, and two boys ages 3 and 6). I live in southern PA in zone 6. I have Laxton's Progress No. 9. Can I use these or should I get a different kind of seed for the fall. Thank you and have a great day.
    Dawn
     
  2. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think you can plant peas all summer. I just planted a patch of black-eyed peas yesterday. For a family of five (parents and three kids) my folks would plant at least an acre. Of course, they gave away or sold a lot of them too.
     

  3. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ravenlost, that acre was probably your Mom's back when she got done picking them.
    About 6 years ago, my wife and I were sitting under a shade tree shelling out peas. I complained about how long it took to shell enough to amount to much. I told her I didn't think they were worth our time. She don't care for them too much anyway so we haven't planted any since.
     
  4. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm with you, Uncle Will. Nothing seems to give me less return on my space and effort than peas! It's not that I don't like them, but I can certainly live without them when I considered cost efficiency.

    The occasional snow pea pods can get a little space, but I don't plant a lot of those either.

    Pony!
     
  5. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    She had three unpaid, under-appreciated helpers in me, my brother and my sister. :p We grew up eating peas and cornbread. During the summer we made stacks for dinner (lunch to some). You make a stack by crumbling your cornbread into your plate. Then you pile peas on top of that (get plenty of pea juice to soak into the cornbread). Then you add a few slices of fresh tomato and pile a big helping of fresh sweet corn on top of that. YUM YUM. Peas are good food, espcially is you have a bunch of free labor to pick and shell for you!
     
  6. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    The peas involved here are English peas rather than the cowpeas of the South. Progress No. 9 is one of my two favorites with Little Marvel being the other. The reason for that is because they are short enough to not require any support. I presently have about a 3x5 plot of Little Marvel which were to be the first picking until rabbits decided otherwise! A 4x8 block of No. 9 is just now blooming. Another 4x8 block of No. 9 has just emerged in the past week. When the first of the No. 9s are done, more will be planted back in the same place. By blocks, that is planting at about 3" spacing in rows about 8" apart. That would be about the same as normal field planting.

    However, I could never imagine ever attempting to grow enough to can or freeze even a few pints. Massive field growing and mechanical processing makes peas one thing which cannot be grown cheaper than buying them. All that I am growing will be for eating fresh and with hopes for a few extra pints for freezing. Although we dearly love them fresh, the idea of sitting down to an hour of shelling peas makes us very thankful for Birds Eye Foods and Green Giant!

    Martin
     
  7. DustyOpal

    DustyOpal Well-Known Member

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    Thank you all for you replys. I had no idea how little return actually came with planting peas. I remember eating peas straight out of the pod when I was little and they were very good. So maybe I will just plant them every year for something for me and the kids to snack on while we are working in the garden and not wory about freezing them. Thank you again for all of your help.
     
  8. swamp man

    swamp man Well-Known Member

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    Spoken like a true southerner. :) Pass the tomato gravy,please ma'am.
     
  9. northstarpermie

    northstarpermie Well-Known Member

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    DustyOpal~We grow enough peas to eat during the summer, fresh peas are the best anyway. In our eyes, it's not a waste of time because they also put nitrogen back into the soil. We have them growing up our corn, on fences, on our trellis, basically anywhere they will grow. When we're done with the plant, we feed it to our chickens, goats, & turkeys. There's never enough left for the compost pile. During the winter, I'll buy organic peas through our coop & buying club. It's not the same as out of the garden, but most people, as stated previously, don't care for the shelling part of it. I see it as picking strawberries, blueberries, or raspberries...one for the pail, one for me, one for the pail, one for me. :p
     
  10. tweety

    tweety Tweety

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    I stick with sugar snap peas, no shelling, eat the whole thing and they freeze well if I don't eat them all right up. Which I usually do. In fact, they often don't even make it to the kitchen. The vines (in northern IN) have just begun to show buds, so I have a few more weeks to wait.
     
  11. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Am I the only person who doesn't mind shelling peas? Guess it must be part of my upbringing! I love to sit in my porch rocker with a pan of peas to shell. I have a cold drink sitting next to me and I watch the dogs playing in the yard while I shell. Nice way to relax after working in the garden.
     
  12. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    We quit growing peas several years ago, also. We love'em, but it was really frustrating to pick a couple of hampers of peas, and wind up with 12 or 14 quarts of peas to go in the freezer. We just plant green beans now. At least with beans, 90% of what's in the bucket goes in the freezer.
     
  13. MoonShine

    MoonShine Fire On The Mountain

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    When I was little,I decided to raise peas,because no one else in my family raised them. I soon realized why they didn't! I had quite a few plants,but they only made a few peas in the end. Disappointing,for sure. Now,I stick with raising sugar snaps :)
    I do love peas and the difference between fresh and store bought is unbelievable.
     
  14. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    If you eat the tendrils and leaves, peas are worth it....otherwise a lot of work for little food. I love the leaves lightly sauteed with garlic.......
     
  15. Barb

    Barb Well-Known Member

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    I admit peas are a lot of work but I'm with Raven - I like sitting on the porch, in the shade, on a hot day, shelling some peas.

    I put in enough to eat fresh and some for the freezer. But huge amounts of peas do require a lot of free labor (kids). But peas are almost the first thing in the garden along with lettuce, radishes, spinach and aspargus. It's nice to have fresh vegetables. My chinese peas are in blossom now so it won't be long - easy to pick, easy to fix.
     
  16. .netDude

    .netDude Well-Known Member

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  17. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    I own one of those....and I've never grown peas since I bought it (well, I grew them, but the wildlife got 'em)