question about my apple tree

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by vulcan, May 21, 2006.

  1. vulcan

    vulcan Well-Known Member

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    I planted an apple tree 4 years ago, I saw many flowers during these years and one small apple (last year) but not really a decent apple. this year he is full of small fruits (like never before) should I expect some apples this year or you think he is still young???
     
  2. manygoatsnmore

    manygoatsnmore Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Sounds like you will have apples. Make sure you thin them so that you will get fewer apples, but of better size. You'll end up with more useable apple that way.
     

  3. vulcan

    vulcan Well-Known Member

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    I have another question now, how you reproduce an apple tree, I tried with seed but to no success.
     
  4. Kee Wan

    Kee Wan Well-Known Member

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    My brother learned about this all - when he was researching to get his apple trees....

    Apparently, apple trees that you get commercially are virtually 100% grafted. THe chances of growing an apple tree from teh seend from one of these grafted trees is nearly zilch. AN dif you do manage to get one growin - the chances that it's going to produce fruit is even slimmer.....

    If you want a tree that you can reproduce, you need to get an heirloom apple tree (one that was NOT grafted, was grown from seed and produces fruit) - and as I understand it, those are harder to come by - but not impossible. Also, you should have several of them so that you can get some genetic diversity as things polinate.....

    That's what my brother told me about it all.....
     
  5. vulcan

    vulcan Well-Known Member

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    I wonder I could I get one of those?
     
  6. Pony

    Pony STILL not Alice Supporter

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  7. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    Kee Wan, you are all wet in what you learned! EVERY named fruiting apple tree that you buy is grafted. The only way that you can propagate any apple variety is via grafting. There is no other way. Apples are one example of every single fruit being a hybrid. Apple trees need another apple tree in order to pollinate the blossoms. Grown from seed, you will generally get the same type of apple as one of the parents but never identical to either of them. Also, every single seed from any apple has an equal chance of producing fruit, grafted or otherwise. Last figures that I saw, starting from seeds, it takes about 10,000 trees before a suitable marketable new variety is produced.

    Martin
     
  8. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    i don't know squat but i disagree. you can grow apples from seed but you will get a full sized tree and not a dwarf. or maybe i am wrong???
     
  9. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    That is correct. You will get a full-sized tree but it will not be the same identical variety as the parents. Any apple variety can be made to grow to whatever size the root stock is programmed to produce. But if the parents are a Delicious and a Greening, the seeds of either are not going to produce the same Delicious or Greening. Instead, it will be somewhere in between and often not even worthy as a pie apple.

    Martin
     
  10. Mountaineer

    Mountaineer Well-Known Member

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    Yes- even "heirloom" apples are on rootstalks. It makes them hardier and better suited to life.
    Grow seeds out if you want. But if you actually want a productive fruit tree in the forseeable future (if ever...)- purchase the variety you want. Seedlings are for people with hundreds of acres- who are specifically breeding for traits. If they get just ONE, they will be thrilled. So, your Spartan cross pollinated with the neighbours Gravenstein is really just a mutt that may or may not amount. I am young, but I have NO time to wait and see what if anything will happen. I want apples now! Without rootstalk- it could be 10 years or more just to get a few apples. And they may taste like crab apples- there's a waste of space in an orchard.
     
  11. Bruce in NE

    Bruce in NE Well-Known Member

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    If you want to make it interesting, you could get into grafting on rootstock you can buy. I bought 40 Bud9 dwarf rootstocks last year and have grafted most of them. Some of the grafts are now growing into little trees. The rootstock can be bought for as little as $1.50 each -- versus $25.00 for one grafted tree you buy. The scions (branches which you remove buds to graft onto the rootstock) can be obtained usually for free or little cost from others who have apple trees.) And there's the satisfaction of creating your own trees almost from scratch. I bought my rootstock from Treco in Oregon. Raintree Nursery also sells rootstock. The Handbook of Grafting is a very good book on grafting.