Question about dogs teeth...

Discussion in 'Working and Companion Animals' started by sisterpine, Oct 12, 2017 at 1:46 PM.

  1. sisterpine

    sisterpine Goshen Farm Supporter

    Messages:
    7,273
    Joined:
    May 9, 2004
    Location:
    Zone 8a, AZ
    Hi, It has been a decade since I had a pup around the stead and this new one seems a bit different LOL. This pup (Maltese and terrier of some type) is almost 5 months old and about 8.5 pounds. She seems to be getting her grown up teeth but it looks like the new teeth are coming in right next almost on top of the puppy teeth. So it looks like she has two extremely close together very sharp teeth. Is this normal?
     
  2. frogmammy

    frogmammy Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    5,793
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2004
    Location:
    usa
    Yes, I've had it happen with some dogs. The old tooth usually loosens and falls out. However. If couple weeks or longer pass and the tooth doesn't fall out and the new one is entirely in, the vet may want to remove it. Humans sometimes have this happen, too.

    Mon
     

  3. kalmara

    kalmara Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    189
    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2011
    Location:
    New Zealand. East Coast (sun !)
    retained milk teeth often happens in dogs, more so in the toy/terrier breeds.
    Feeding bones that they really need to chew can help in some instances to move them on out. As your pup is now 5 months old IMHO I'd be off to the vet to have the retained teeth removed, before they start causing problems. Retained teeth can interfere with the correct placement of the incoming teeth which in turn can make it difficult for the pup to eat. They can also start to decay & cause gum problems.
     
    RichNC likes this.
  4. In The Woods

    In The Woods Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    200
    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2017
    Location:
    NW Penna
    I agree with kalmara - dogs, especially puppies, need to chew! Not only for their teeth but a way to help get rid of pent up energy.

    I’ve been feeding my pup a large hard kibble (Science Diet large breed puppy). So many of the reviews for this food say that it is too hard for their dogs to chew. Well dogs are carnivores and need to chew!

    On another forum I frequent a couple people take their dogs to the vet for teeth cleaning every so many months at a cost of over $300. That is just crazy in my opinion. When asked what they feed their dogs it is either a soft kibble or canned food. They say they want a food that is easy for them to chew.

    My pups teeth are strong and healthy because he has to chew his food.
     
  5. sisterpine

    sisterpine Goshen Farm Supporter

    Messages:
    7,273
    Joined:
    May 9, 2004
    Location:
    Zone 8a, AZ
    True that about the kibble. Spoke the vet and she wants to look at the mouth at about 9 months of age and give the dog hard stuff to chew on as well. I know the small breeds do need considerably more dental care than the larger breeds for some reason. Have another Maltese (who eats only dry kibble) going into the vet at month end for teeth cleaning.
     
  6. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Formerly LisainN.Idaho Supporter

    Messages:
    15,356
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2004

    Dogs don't really chew their food anyway. Look at their teeth....no real grinders. They swallow it pretty much whole (kibble) and the digestion starts in the stomach, not the mouth as it does with humans. I was shocked to find out that our late and almost toothless Pug didn't need soft food. He was just fine on his prescription kibble.

    CET chews are a good option for teeth but don't buy them in pet stores. They wanted 38 bucks for a bag in Petco and 12 for the same bag on Amazon.