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Argghh, I had a bunch of dill plants about 6 inches high, and they were doing great, until last night when the slugs ate them down to nothing.

Will they grow back up? I know when you pinch the ends off, they keep growing but this is down to the ground now.

We are eating eggs as fast as we can around here, spreading the shells around the plants protecting them from slugs. It seems to be working for the plants that are protected, I just didn't get to the dill in time.

mljjranch-who is serving beer, eggs, and coffee to the slugs everyday! :haha:
 

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If the seedlings have been eaten right down to the ground, they may not be able to produce more leaves. Next time, before planting your seeds, plant a row of toilet roll inners (or some plastic bottles with tops and bottoms removed) first, and put the seeds inside that. They will protect the seedlings until they're large enough to fend for themselves. Alternatively, scatter some very fine wood shavings or some bran around the seedlings - snails and slugs hate that! And besides, the bran will kill the slugs.
 

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It is possible it could be butterfly caterpillars or moths eating your dill. Moths usually eat at night, and butterfly ones eat in the daytime. They eat like chainsaws and can eat a plant overnight. Snails or slugs normally eat plants at a slower rate.

If it is butterflies, I hate to suggest killing them because butterflies are getting rarer all the time. If it is caterpillars, you might want to just hand pluck them and move them to another spot, perferably a flower. :)

You can read about them here:

http://www.oznet.ksu.edu/johnson/hort/Butterfly/BlackSwallowtail.htm

If you decide to replant which you should have plenty of time to do, I would watch it closely for the little eggs that become caterpillars. If you see them, know that the caterpillars will soon be there too.
 

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When the swallowtail invade my dill, it is usually the leaves they are on, not close to the ground. It's still too cold in my area (NW IL) for swallowtail catapillers to be munching. I try to plant more dill than I will need because I know I will have the swallowtail. If they get too invasive, I'll use DE (diatamateous earth) sprinkled over the plants. Be sure to wash it off before using the dill!
 
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