Question about Butchering

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by Susan-DonB, Nov 8, 2004.

  1. Susan-DonB

    Susan-DonB Member

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    Stokes County, NC
    This may be a dumb question but I am new to farming and a city slicker so please allow some grace time.

    When you take a pig to a processor to be killed and butchered, how do you know you are getting YOUR pig back? And how do you know you are getting ALL your meat?

    I dont want to insult the man when I take my pigs to him next year that I am going to raise next summer.

    Thanks,
    Susan Berry
    NC
     
  2. Wanda

    Wanda Well-Known Member

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    Susan
    Ask him if you can watch him do the deed :D Seriously talk to the locals that use his services and then go talk to the owner!! Most people that have been in buisnes for any lenght of time do it by repeat buisnes. The ones that cry the loudest about switched meat ect. have no clue what they should be getting back! When you talk to your butcher ask him what average dressing% are and what the average yield of each primal cut is. In the last 40 years of dealing with lockers I have only met 1 crook and he did not stay in buisnes 2 full years. Pick a time when the butcher is not busy(kill days) and have a friendly chat and I think you will find that most of them are very nice people. When your beast is vet inspected and slaughtered the will put a tag with your name on the carcas halves when it goes to the cooler. When your beast is brought out to be cut and wrapped they will do it by itself and the pkgs. will be labeled with the name of the cut and your name. All of the pkgs. will be grouped together and be quick frozen and you will be called to come get your homegrown meat. They will ask you beforehand how you want it cut and the amount per pkg. I would say that the odds are very much in your favor that the local butcher will be an upstanding member of the comunity. If there is more than 1 cchoice go and see them all.
    Mr Wanda
    Mike
     

  3. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    It's actually not that difficult to do the butchering yourself. Watching someone the first time is a good idea, there ae also some shortcuts
     
  4. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    Susan, that's not a dumb question at all! :) Some butchers can't be trusted and it does help to shop around for a trustworthy one.

    We butcher our own, it's nice to know that we are eating the homegrown, non medicated meat that we raise instead of who knows what.
     
  5. Susan-DonB

    Susan-DonB Member

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    Stokes County, NC
    thanks for the responses everyone. I will get some references, but I couldn't possibly watch. It has taken quite a bit to get to the point of even considering eating someone I know personally! :waa:

    Susan
     
  6. Paul O

    Paul O Well-Known Member

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    Susan,
    You don't have to watch. Just drop it off and pick up the packages. Most slaughterhouses do a decent job. It may feel strange at first eating something you cared for but believe me the quality of the meat has a way of softening the heart.
    I always felt that I provided the animal a better life than ones in the super market had so I don't feel bad about it.
    As an aside, I can't help thinking about my daughter many years ago. She insisted on naming our animals, over my ojections. When it finally came to the first meal with our own raised beef she said "Is this Nikoli?(sp?). I said yes. She said "Nikoli sure tastes good." ;) ;) ;)


    Paul
     
  7. Susan-DonB

    Susan-DonB Member

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    Stokes County, NC
    This is also true, I have already chosen names for my first 4 , Bacon, Ham, Pork Chop and Split Pea! I am trying to keep things in perspective. :p
     
  8. goldspur

    goldspur Well-Known Member

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    Pierre SD
    My family has allways done their own meat, I mean nearly every scrap is used, meat one side,fat another,to be frozen or to be mixed with other less fatty meats, such as deer when season is open. I know in locker plants one can not save as much as you can if you do it yourself, have not seen a locker usually sending home the fat tallo onless some one asked for it back. Home grown and butchered by yourself are great, you'll always know where it came from, and how much it really lbs out.
     
  9. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    ontario
    It may feel strange at first eating something you cared for but believe me the quality of the meat has a way of softening the heart.
    I always felt that I provided the animal a better life than ones in the super market had so I don't feel bad about it.



    I can relate to this, but its more of 'whew after all that blood and gut', kinda makes you feel a little...green. I lost my appetite for a few days for any food. But its a week or so later, and I have no problem now! Yumm this meat is delectable!! I just hope I can stay active enough over winter so that I don't start looking like my food!!
     
  10. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    :haha: I wonder if I do enough snowshoeing activity that it will keep me from looking like a turkey. :no:

    The question about wondering what you get back from the butcher compared to what you get in the store? Sometimes I'm wondering what really some of those cuts in the large grocery store is, even though we are assured by the label.
    As for your own raised pigs and trusting the local butcher, it would probably do well for you to get familiar with them and some customers that deal with them who have taken in their pigs. Word would get around about complaints if they were trying to pull a fast one, even if you are a 'city slicker'. Know some of your country neighbors advice. It can't hurt, especially if you settle in for living to raise stock for the longer term. I haven't raised pigs, but I have purchased lamb on the hoof from a farmer that I got to know, even while living in town, so I had to trust his weighing and quality as well as the butcher he took it to. So far, I've not been disappointed. Deer I've had to the other local butcher was trustworthy about my game. It doesn't hurt to let them know that you expect fairness.