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How long would you quarantine first goats?

We only have chickens and guineas right now and they are confined to a chicken tractor. They will eventually free range. We are about ready to bring 2 goats in ("brush goats, do not plan to breed or milk). I have found a lot of different recommendations for quarantine - ranging from 1 to 6 months. I have also found many different recommendations on the "level" of quarantine - ranging from "just avoid going in too much" to "wash in bleach before and after entry, require all visitors to property to change to clean clothes, etc."

Anyway ... what would be prudent if there are no other goats to protect? We are just concerned with the contamination of the land.
 

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If the goats were tested by the previous owner you have very little to worry about. CAE is only transmitted by close goat to goat contact. The Johnnes MAP virus can be spread through feces. And CL is spread via a burst abccess (and rarely through feces of an animal with internal abcesses). If you got them through dubious sources, like an auction, you could quarantine them in a smaller area. Test and then follow up test to be sure(advice varies on duration). All goats carry a worm load and cocci. On new land your animals will have the opportunity of a completely parasite free environment. I would take advantage of that right from the start by rotational grazing/browsing. You'll never regret it! It will avoid problems with worms for years to come.
 

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Very little reason to quarantine if you don't already have goats. :) Have them tested as per the post above.
 

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While I agree with everyone else on not needing to quarantine, I would not bring them home and turn them loose in a pasture immediately. That is a really good way for them to go over/under/through the fence and keep on going! Keep them penned in a secure pen for at least 2 weeks to a month to make sure they have become comfortable in their new home and won't bolt out of fear.
 

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While I agree with everyone else on not needing to quarantine, I would not bring them home and turn them loose in a pasture immediately. That is a really good way for them to go over/under/through the fence and keep on going! Keep them penned in a secure pen for at least 2 weeks to a month to make sure they have become comfortable in their new home and won't bolt out of fear.
We have decided we will keep them in a smaller portion of the pasture with an electric net (and continue using the net for rotation after that). Do you think that will keep them in? The net will be 48 inches tall and our perimeter fence is a field fence with electric wire on the inside.
 

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I would not allow access to a pasture for the first 2 to 4 weeks - depending on how quickly they adapt to new surroundings. 48" tall is only 4'. You don't mention the breed of your new goats, but I've got standard sized goats that can - and did - jump that flat footed. My fences are now at least 5' high - and usually 6'. If they do escape, it's going to be a nightmare trying to catch them again. To me, it simply isn't worth the risk.
 

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I would not allow access to a pasture for the first 2 to 4 weeks - depending on how quickly they adapt to new surroundings. 48" tall is only 4'. You don't mention the breed of your new goats, but I've got standard sized goats that can - and did - jump that flat footed. My fences are now at least 5' high - and usually 6'. If they do escape, it's going to be a nightmare trying to catch them again. To me, it simply isn't worth the risk.
Thanks. We are not getting standard size goats and they probably will be "mutts" as we are only getting them for brush control.
 

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The fence sounds adequate for me! I'd keep them penned for a few days at least to see how they're adjusting, and then I'd turn them out. If they've been on pasture/brush before, they should be fine.
 
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