quail for hunters

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Cyngbaeld, Nov 2, 2005.

  1. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    My neighbor mentioned that some hunters he knew would buy all the quail (and ringnecked pheasants) that I could raise. He wasn't sure which variety of quail they preferred. I was thinking maybe the bob white quail, but wasn't sure. Any guesses?
     
  2. longshadowfarms

    longshadowfarms Well-Known Member

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    The flying kind. Really. Bobwhites are good, jumbos are good. Just make sure that once they've feathered out they get some flight time. Pheasants are a lot harder than quail IMO. They are more likely to pick at each other. Provide TONS of space, use red lights, etc. Good luck! We're hoping to do some pheasants next year too since we have a dog young enough to hunt again.
     

  3. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There is A big demand for flight ready,Conditioned Bobwhites. You need to know if they want the regular types.Or the giants ,The giants can weigh up to A pound each,And they can fly also. Thee owhites only weigh about 7-8 ounces each. Both types will breed together too. And there are At least 5 types of Giants avalible. You will also need to maintain breeders to get the numbers you need to make A profitable sales venture.. And for pheasants you need to research their care and breeding too. Just like Bowhites you will need state and Maybe Fedreal permits.So price your equiptment and brood stock to figure out if this will work for you...
     
  4. cowboy joe

    cowboy joe Hired Hand

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    A special license may be required to raise domestic game birds for sale. I live in NY and the DEC issues a license for $50 / year. Bobwhites are a good choice. Stay away from the Japenese quail (aka Cortunix) as they are migratory birds...good for one season then gone. Quail are very vocal so you'll need a secure location to raise them, like a barn, especially before they are flight conditioned or the raccoons will make short work of them. A single coon can wipe out a couple dozen birds in a single night...
     
  5. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Thanks. I did not know the cortunix were migratory. Interesting.

    I don't have a barn, it is one the 'when I get more money' list. Right now I'm looking for ways to make this little farm pay for itself and the quail/pheasant business looks like a good one. I'm studying up on 'how to'. I have the red-golden pheasants now and really enjoy them.

    The pens will be inside a perimeter fence of 2x4 welded wire with electric fence outside of that. Hopefully that will be enough to deter predators.
     
  6. Ed in S. AL

    Ed in S. AL Well-Known Member

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    Out there is a fortune wait to be had, you think I'll let it go your mad!

    I already have every ringneck I can hatch out and get started good sold for next spring. I think the wife is about ready for me to up grade to a much larger incubator. Sell the heck out of them if you get the chance. Not to mention you can sell the heck out of the hatching eggs on Ebay. You will sell every pheasant and quail egg you can list on Ebay. And they make good money. I have never had a problem with the pheasants picking on each other, but the quail where another story. I just gave up on raising quail.
     
  7. Concrete Cowboy

    Concrete Cowboy Well-Known Member

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    The important thing is that they are flight conditioned. I am trianing a bird dog now and bought quail for 3.50 each. The problem is, my dog can catch them. Not very good for his training. I won't go back there. If I knew they were strong flyers, I'd pay extra.
     
  8. Unregistered

    Unregistered Well-Known Member

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    Hi Kim,
    Most everyone who raises poultry will try the quail or pheasants sometimes. If you already have the pens you can make a small amount if you are lucky. The going price for quail has been at $3 or less for many years and will probably stay there. The birds have to be flight conditioned or they aren't any good for hunting. A flight pen has to be large enough for the birds to fly for a distance.
    The price for ringneck pheasants is around $7 each and that is for the roosters. The hens are useless for hunting. They have to be flight conditioned also but take a larger pen.
    Everybody will tell you how much they can make raising quail or pheasants but you will notice they do not raise them. All the game clubs will contract for their birds well before season. Most do not buy small numbers of birds and will want fresh birds all during the season.
    All breeder birds have to be raised on wire and all release birds should be raised on the ground. That takes up a lot of room.
    Most of the people I know who make any money on birds have the land to release for hunters. When you figure the cost of feed, pens, equipment, you can see how many birds you will have to sell to make a profit. Then if disease hits you can forget it all. Game birds are known for their likelyhood of disease.
    There will be many people who will tell you different but just ask how many they have sold the last couple of years. Any birds bringing over the normal price is just lucky and will usually equal out to the number you loose to disease or predators.
     
  9. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    Another area you might look into is the taxidermy trade.
    When I was younger, a friend raised bobwhites for fun. I had occasion also to fool around with learning basic taxidermy. Back then I hunted a few wild quail and decided to try mounting a pair. They didn't turn out that great, but my brother was quite taken up that they looked so nice and took them as an art piece. I see quail and pheasant mounts sold through Cabela's for a fancy dollar. I also had a cock pheasant I raised that a budding taxidermist in this area mounted for me to put on the wall. There must be some demand for these which you might look into for offering to taxidermists, or maybe an art you can develop from your own birds. Also, feathers for the fishing tackle trade, fly tying. Some of the fancy pheasant varieties might have some interest also for custom fishing rod builders. If you have chickens that show feathers that are like jungle cock 'eyes', experiment with that idea to offer. The internet for info might be your friend in those arenas. I'm sure demand lies somewhere for feathers and birds you might raise.
    good luck.
     
  10. Pops2

    Pops2 Well-Known Member

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    definitely need to flight condition them
     
  11. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Guess I'll get a few quail and ringnecks and see how I do raising them before investing in too much equipment.

    If that goes ok, I will definitely flight train them.

    Thanks for all the advice.
     
  12. Iddee

    Iddee Well-Known Member

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    Looking for a return on a small piece of land, with a minimul investment, time, and trouble, I would look at beepeeping. You sell the honey, the wax, even swarms of bees, yet the time and equip. is little compared to birds and mammals.
     
  13. 3girls

    3girls Well-Known Member

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    See Sue Hubbel's book on beekeeping. You'll be hooked.
     
  14. JayinCT

    JayinCT Well-Known Member

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    I raised Ringnecks for a while a few years back. I made some money at it, but really not enough to make it worth while. If I had gone in heavy and tried to raise 10,000 per year, I could have made a few dollars, but even that is a gamble depending on what I lost to animals ect. Try what I did. I had a local nursury that got bought up by a developer. He was going to rip out all the greenhouses. Free for taking them down, I got two of them. Rather than cover them with plastic again, I covered them with netting. There is your flight pen. You still need a shelter and also a good perimeter of electric fence to keep the animals out, but it works out rather well.

    Jay
     
  15. albionjessica

    albionjessica Hiccoughs after eating

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    I tried raising the bobwhites in the UP for a school project. Hatched them from eggs in an incubator. Only half hatched (5/11). They all died wierd deaths before we were even able to let them outside. I followed all the instructions that the local quail guy told me. He attributed it to a bacterial infection, and told me that bobwhites are usually hard to raise anyway.
     
  16. JayinCT, I have a cold frame that is 15' wide, about 7' high, and 100' long. Do you think that would make a good flight pen for quail or pheasants?

    Another question to anybody who knows the answer. What kind of effect will this avian bird flu have on quails, pheasants, and turkeys?
     
  17. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Avian influenza A viruses can infect a variety of domestic and wild avian species (including chickens, turkeys, ducks, domestic geese, quail, pheasants, partridge, psittacines, gulls, shorebirds, seabirds, emu, and others). The clinical manifestation of infection in birds ranges from asymptomatic infection to rapidly fatal disease (see References: Horimoto 2001).

    http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/idsa/influenza/avianflu/biofacts/avflu.html
     
  18. Christiaan

    Christiaan Dutch Highlands Farm

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    In addition to Ringnecks and Bobwhites you might consider Chukars. I've raised all three and prefer the Bobwhites as the Ringnecks and Chukars were a bit too vicious for my taste.
    With proper husbandry the common gamebirds aren't any more difficult to raise than chickens, but their space requirements are higher.
    If the outlay is reasonable, go for it. At the very least you'll have fun and gain some experience.
    Some of the more "exotic" native gamebirds are lots of fun but have to many reproduction issues to be useful as release birds. Blue Scale are my particular favorites, but Mountain and Valley quail are great fun, too.
    I have raised Coturnix and sold them for meat locally, but the real money in them was the eggs. I sold to two or three local Asian stores and could never meet the demand. Those eggs supported my hobby for a few years.
    Got rid of all my gamebirds when we moved from town to the farm and I just haven't gotten around to building a new aviary. Someday..................